//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN"> 1920 Beach Advance Extracts

BIRTH, MARRIAGES, DEATHS FROM
The Beach Advance
1920



BIRTH, MARRIAGES, DEATHS FROM THE BEACH ADVANCE 1920


January 2nd, 1920

Wild Dash For A Honeymoon Nipped At Ollie
Says Meeting of American Legion Officials Was Helpful to the Soldier Boys
Got A Glimpse of High Life at Washington Saw Much of Interest

Monday night Charles Sheppard and Miss Dessa Prouty, both of Ollie, sought to be married quietly at the Prouty home and then … themselves away to Baker and eastern points on the honeymoon before any of their friends knew of the affair.
But even Cupid gets his wires crossed and from unexpected sources secrets are given to the world. So in this case, when Joe Greiner of this city, and his wife received an imperious summons to come to the Prouty home without fail Monday night they hastened down by auto expecting to find some of their relatives sick, they found instead a pair of “turtle doves” cooing and waiting for the preacher to say the words that would permit them to take autos and depart for Baker on the honeymoon before the “gang” knew what had happened.
Like the wicked cuss that he is, Joe slipped out and passed the word as to what was going on, with the result that a dance then in progress, was stopped and a bunch went over to the Prouty home, tied up the autos and soon after the Rev. Thayer had said the “fatal words,” seized the bride and groom, conveyed them to the dance and had them start in married life, first with a two-step and then a one-step, so that the rosy morn was streaking the eastern sky when the lassoed autos were released and the happy couple wended their way toward the town through which the Milwaukee road meanders toward the haleyon bliss of newly married life for the Sheppards in an eastern paradise.
The moral of this tale being that it is a dull night when you catch Joe Greiner and the Ollie bunch asleep.


January 2nd, 1920

News of Christmas Week
Russell Kirkpatrick arrived Sunday from Dunn Center, this state, where he has been teaching school, to spend the holidays with his parents


January 2nd, 1920

Births
The home of Mr. and Mrs. Mike Moran was blessed last Friday because the stork left a fine baby girl there. It was intended evidently as a Christmas gift, but the stork had too many errands of that kind and was delayed.

Last Saturday a splendid baby boy wandered into the home of Joe Ramstad from the “Land of Nowhere,” and made the Christmas season brighter for that family.

Monday was a red letter day for Mr. and Mrs. Hezzie Keller because of the arrival of a baby girl in their home.


January 2nd, 1920

G. Peall celebrated on Tuesday the double anniversary of his birthday and marriage. It is understood, however, that these two interesting events did not come in the same year, though on the same date in the month. Those few friends who knew of the event hastened to congratulate the genial couple on this 35th wedding anniversary, but no one could . . . the gallant plumber to say what anniversary he was celebrating on his own account.


January 2nd, 1920

Meredith-Cook Wedding Quiet New Year Event
Chester O. Meredith and B. Frances Cook Quietly Married at Home of Bride

A quiet home wedding occurred News Years day at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Cook when their daughter B. Frances Cook was married to Chester O. Meredith of Fairmont, N.D., only relatives of the families being present. The marriage was performed by Rev. Charles Richter of the Congregational church, the ring ceremony being used, the bride being accompanied by Miss Beatrice Sprague, her cousin, Earl Meredith, a brother of the groom acting as best man. After the ceremony the happy couple left for Fairmont, N.D., on No. 2, amid the good wishes of a host of friends. Miss Cook is well known in this county, having taught school at many points, and is one of the charming daughters of Beach. The groom was a former resident of this county and has many friends here. He has a prosperous garage business at Fairmont, where he and his bride will be at home to friends after February 1.


January 2nd, 1920

Mark P. Lovgren left Tuesday noon for Red Wing, Minn., on receipt of a telegram saying his mother was seriously ill, since which time word has been received that his mother had died before he reached her. The community will join in sincere sympathy to Mr. Lovgren in his bereavement.


January 2nd, 1920

Doings of the People of Golva

A pair of twin boys arrived at the Luenberger ranch southeast of town, one day last week.

Word has been received by John Sackmeister that his father, Martin Sackmeister, formerly of Golva, died last week in New Ulm, Minn.

Charles and Warren Kirkpatrick, who have been working at various places in the west for the past six months, are visiting at the home of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. N. Kirkpatrick.

A dancing party was given at the T. N. Kirkpatrick home of Friday evening, at which a number of the young people of Golva and the surrounding country were present. All report a very pleasant time.


January 2nd, 1920

Interesting News of the Ollie Folks

Miss Clara Hopper gave a surprise birthday party for her brother, Otho, Monday evening. About fifteen of the young people went out from town. All report a fine time.


January 2nd, 1920

Word has been received by friends here that the home of L. W. Carlisle at Bismarck, was blessed Thursday by the arrival of a fine boy, and the many Beach friends join in congratulations. The Carlisle’s went from here to Montana last fall, but not liking it there, moved to Bismarck, where Mr. C. is playing the telephone game to his and the company’s satisfaction.


January 9th, 1920

Two Died In Holthe Farm Home Fire
Jacob Knops Burned in Building Mrs. Holthe Dies of Her Injuries
Baby Born To Dying Woman
Mr. Holthe and Brother-in-Law Barely Escape With Their Lives

The farm home of Harold Holthe, four miles east of Sentinel Butte, was burned early last Friday morning, Jacob Knoph, an uncle of Mr. Holthe, being burned to death, and Mrs. Holthe dying Monday as a result of burns received. Mr. Holthe was also badly burned in saving his baby, which he rescued by throwing it from a window into a snow bank. Mr. Knoph was 74 years old and too feeble to escape from the fire, which had engulfed the house when discovered. The cause of the fire is unknown. The saddest outcome of this dreadful event is the fact that Mrs. Holthe gave birth to a baby shortly before she died, but the infant soon followed the mother. When the fire was discovered the kitchen was a mass of flames, and as the door through the kitchen was the only means of escape for the inmates of the house, Mr. Holthe jumped from a window and beat down the door with an ax, and it was through this Mrs. Holthe and a young brother were taken by Mr. Holthe, all three being badly burned in passing through the flames in the kitchen, as they only had on their night clothes. Putting the wife and baby and boy in the granary, Mr. Holthe walked half a mile through the snow, barefooted and in only his night apparel, for aid, which was promptly given and the family taken to Sentinel Butte where everything possible was done for the injured people. The survivors are recovering, though seriously burned. Mrs. Holthe and baby and Mr. Knoph were buried from the Sentinel Butte church Thursday, amid a host of sympathetic and sorrowing friends.


January 9th, 1920

Miss Edna Trester and J. Cook of Glendive, Mont., were married at the formers home, Wednesday morning, Miss J. E. Cook being the bridesmaid, while Leonard Trester was best man. Miss Trester was formerly of Sentinel Butte but has recently held a position in Glendive. She has many friends in this vicinity as she has made this her home and attended school here for several years. Mr. Cook is an electrician and is employed by the Eastern Montana Light and Power Co., at Glendive. The young couple will make their home in Glendive and all wish them many happy and prosperous years in their new home.


January 9th, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. Al. Brownlee are the proud parents of a darling baby boy, born on New Years morn. Both mother and son are doing nicely and Mr. Brownlee is buying the boys cigars.


January 9th, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. H. Lehman went to Glendive, Friday to officiate at the wedding of Charles Richter of Belfield, which took place Saturday.


January 9th, 1920

Russell Kirkpatrick returned to Dunn Center, this state, Saturday to prepare for the opening of the school Monday.


January 9th, 1920

DeWitt Walker and Florence Kirkpatrick attended the Medora dance last Saturday night.


January 9th, 1920

Death of Mrs. Ortner

Mrs. Winnie Ortner, formerly of Sentinel Butte, passed away in Alma, Neb., Saturday evening. Mrs. Ortner left here about three weeks ago for Alma, stopping enroute to visit with her mother at Galesburg, N.D., having left only a few days ago for her final destination. She had gone to Alma to accept a position with the Atlat company, expecting to work until Mr. Ortner could arrange his affairs and be with her there. Late Saturday night word was received from Dr. Jerr of Alma, that Mrs. Ortner had taken suddenly ill and died, which, no doubt, meant heart trouble developing from a lightning stroke which Mrs. Ortner received some years ago, and which also affected her eyesight. Mr. Ortner left Sunday for Alma to take care of the remains, which no doubt, will be taken to Galesburg and be laid to rest near her old home. Mrs. Ortner leaves her mother Mrs. Amy Brown, of Galesburg, a brother Leon Brown, of Washington, and her husband, William Ortner, of Sentinel Butte. Her many friends are sorrowful at her loss and extend their deepest sympathy to those who are left.


January 9th, 1920

County Treasurer Crone Is A Long Time Married
Secretly Invades Montana and Marries the Love of His School Days
Marriage Took Place December 20, at Billings, But Kept Secret Till Now

Announcements have reached the city of the marriage at Billings, Montana at 10 a.m. December 20, 1919, at the parsonage of the Christian church, of Carmen I. Crone of this city and Miss Lillian Liles, of …..on, Montana. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Ritz of the Christian church of Billings, and after the wedding the party repaired to the home of Isaac Peacock, a friend of the bride, where a wedding breakfast was enjoyed. The bride was dressed in crepe da chene, while the groom wore the conventional black. The happy pair took No. 2 that day to Terry from whence they went to the Thurston ranch, the home of the bride and on New Years night a dance was given in their honor, and the groom returned to Beach, Sunday last as innocent as a lamb as to the performances above related. The bride is well and kindly known in Beach, having graduated from the local high school three years ago, and after training at the normal school, has been teaching at …..on, which accounts for the frequent absence from Beach of the ….ial county treasurer. The date that these young people will be “at home” in Beach depends upon when another teacher can be secured in …….Crone’s place, but it will not be earlier than March first in any event, and it is needless to say that the couple will be given a hearty home coming when she returns to Beach to renew her residence.


January 9th, 1920

Howard Egan Married

A Montana newspaper has the following bit of news of interest to people hereaway: After bringing Howard Egan of Golva, N.D., and Miss Catherine Hushey of Denver, Col., to Lewiston, Dan Cupid finished his work Tuesday morning, when the couple were married at the St. Rose of Lima Catholic church there. They left Wednesday afternoon for Los Angeles, Cal. The couple had been staying at the Lewiston hotel while there. It is supposed by the hotel people that they knew each other only through letters exchanged. It is probable that after a period of this “long distance” wooing, the couple decided that they were meant for each other. Having settled this important question, they picked Lewiston as the place from which to start their married life.


January 9th, 1920

Interesting News of Ollie Folks

Shepherd - Prouty

A. Prouty’s home was the scene of a pretty wedding when their daughter, Dessa L., was untied in marriage to Charles F. Shepherd, on Monday evening, December 29th, at 8 o’clock, Rev. L. L. Thayer officiating. They were attended by Fay Shepherd, a brother of the groom, and Miss Clara ….opper. The groom is a son of Mr. and Mrs. … S. Shepherd, and has lived near Ollie for several years. He is a young man of good habits and high ideals. The bride is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Art Prouty, and has grown to womanhood in this community. She is one of Ollie’s popular young ladies and is loved and admired by all her friends. The newlyweds left on Tuesday for points in Iowa and Wisconsin. After a two week’s honeymoon the young couple will return to Ollie, where the groom will finish his term teaching in the Horse Creek school. The happy couple have the best wishes of their friends in their journey through life.


January 9th, 1920

Dr. O. R. Niece and his bride are back from their wedding trip to the Twin Cities and have taken up their residence in the Burke mansion on the north side.


January 16th, 1920

Late Sentinel Butte Happenings

L. A. Brown, brother to Mrs. W. Ortner, who died in Nebraska a few days ago, was here Wednesday from Summer, Washington, to look after several little matters his sister had left to him. He states that Mrs. Ortner’s death was caused from an operation for abscesses on the tonsils. After having her tonsils removed Mrs. Ortner was in great pain and asked to be given something to ease her. She was given a mild anesthetic but on account of her weak heart, it was too strong for her and she never wolk up.

Miss Evelyn Northrop entertained the Camp Fire girls at her home last Tuesday evening and after the ceremonial meeting was over she invited a few of her friends in to partake of the feast which she herself had prepared. The occasion of outsiders being allowed was Miss Evelyn’s 18th birthday. She received many beautiful and valuable gifts. All had a pleasant time and hope Miss Evelyn has the same affair over again on her 19th birthday.

Thursday was a sad day for Sentinel Butte as the three victims of the Holthe fire were laid to rest in the Sentinel Butte cemetery, Mrs. Harold Holthe, her infant daughter and her uncle, Mr. Knoph.

Joe Huber, Sr., returned Thursday from the east, where he attended the funeral of his mother.


January 16th, 1920

Married

Married at Wibaux, Tuesday evening, January 6, Miss Louella Simonson and Leo Bek (sic), both of Carlyle. Miss Simonson has been teaching school near Belfield, and Mr. Beck is proprietor of the Carlyle pool ….. Hosts of friends wish them joy untold.


January 16th, 1920

A party was given at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Guy Curl last Monday evening in honor of Mr. Curl’s birthday. quite a number of young people from Golva and vicinity were present.


January 16th, 1920

Florence and Russell Kirkpatrick of Sentinel Butte, were visitors at the home of Mr. and Mrs. T. N. Kirkpatrick several days this week.


January 16th, 1920

Interesting News of Ollie Folks

Miss Louello Simonson of Carlyle, and Leo Beck of Beach, were united in marriage, January 6, 1920, at Wibaux, Mont. They are making their home at Carlyle, where the groom is conducting a pool hall. The Beck family will be remembered as having lived here when Ollie first started. Friends of the newlyweds wish them much happiness through their journey of life.


January 16th, 1920

Robert Zook a prosperous young farmer living between Golva and Sentinel Butte, and Miss Margaret Fakler, daughter of Conrad Fakler, are to be married next Wednesday at the Catholic church in Beach.


January 16th, 1920

R. Lorenza, the genial manager of the Golva Farmer’s store, is liable to give his entire stock away in his exuberance over the arrival of a fine boy at his home last Monday night. Everybody is doing fine.


January 23rd, 1920

Joseph Raisler Claimed By Influenza-Pneumonia
Splendid Young Man Stricken In Prime of Youth Is Called By Death

The community was shocked last Tuesday when it learned that the dread influenza had carried away one of our county’s brightest and most promising young men, Joseph B. Raisler, son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Raisler, after a sickness of but a few days. The sympathy of the many friends of deceased and his family are the more shocked over this sudden taking away, because of the loss of another son but a few months ago in an auto accident, the family being noted for the devotion of each member to the others. The funeral was held this morning from the Thelan church, interment being in the Beach cemetery. Joseph Raisler was born in Indiana from which state his family removed to Golden Valley county some years ago and here the boy grew to manhood on the farm in Lone Tree township, being 21 years, one month and 18 days old at the time of his death. Deceased became sick last week with what was supposed to be a case of lagrippe, but which developed late in the week into a typical case of influenza of great virulence, and in spite of all that medical science could do he passed away in the midst of his stricken family Tuesday morning. He was a young man of good habits and full of ambition to become a farmer of the best type, as is his father, but death loves a shining mark and that home is left in grief over the sudden taking away. The funeral was largely attended by mourning friends from town and county, and the deepest sympathy of all who know the stricken relatives goes out to them.


January 23rd, 1920

Sentinel Butte Happenings

In the death of Mrs. Lundblad, Sentinel Butte has lost one of its best home-making women, a lady who was a lady in every respect, and a wonderful mother. There are many who mourn her loss with the relatives and extend their deepest sympathy to those who grieve for her.

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Shaffer are the proud parents of a blue-eyed baby girl, born Tuesday morning.


January 23rd, 1920

Obituary

Hattie Sophia Lundblad was born in Ottertail county, Minnesota, March 28, 1881, and fell asleep in death at Bismarck hospital, North Dakota, January 16, 1920, aged 39 years, 9 months and 18 days. She was married June 5, 1900 to Samuel Lundblad. To this union were born three children. The oldest, a daughter, Joy, and two boys, LeRoy and Fayette. Out departed sister became sick soon after Thanksgiving and continued to grow worse until the death angel relieved her suffering. Besides her three children she is survived by her husband, who is left in loneliness on account of her early departure. She is also survived by two brothers and five sisters, Mrs. Henderson of Sentinel Butte; Mrs. John A. Trana of Henning, Minn.; Mrs. Mabel Murphy of Couer d’Alene, Idaho; Mrs. Ira Morris, of Puyallup, Washington; Mrs. Ada Taunt of B..medji, Minnesota; John Chapman of Sentinel Butte; and Levi Chapman of Seattle, Wash. Her mother and grandmother of Couer d’Alene, Idaho also survive her.


January 23rd, 1920

Miss Nana (sic) Cushing’s Engagement Announced

Bismarck Tribune: An announcement and shower party was given last night in honor of Miss Nan (sic) Cushing, whose marriage to Basil Magee of Dawson to be an event of March, was announced. More than twenty women friends of Miss Cushing attended the party and showered the bride-to-be with practical gifts. The party was given by Mr. and Mrs. Charles Staley at their home 701 Sixth street. Miss Cushing holds an important position with the Bismarck hospital and is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Cushing, formerly of this city and well known throughout the state. Mr. Cushing is at present publisher of the Beach Advance at Beach, and Mrs. Cushing, besides her many musical activities in the state, is conducting the Post, a weekly, at Fargo. Miss Cushing is a graduate of the local high school and is one of the most popular women in the city. Mr. Magee is a prominent young man of Dawson. The guests last night enjoyed themselves in a social manner. Mrs. Staley served a luncheon during the evening. The home was appropriately decorated with hearts and Cupid’s darts, significant of the approaching nuptials.


January 23rd, 1920

A little son arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Fasching on Thursday, January 15th.


January 23rd, 1920

A fine big boy arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Lorenz on Monday, January 12th.


January 23rd, 1920

Born to Mrs. M. K. Bowen, a son, Monday, January 15th.


January 23rd, 1920

M. P. Lovgren has returned after an extended absence necessitated by the death of his mother. The jewelry shop, of course, was an attractive place during Mr. Lovgren’s absence, as it always is, but still the place looks more natural, with the boss around.


January 30th, 1920

A. O. Whitney Passes To The Great Adventure
Well Known Farmer-Business Man Succumbs After Months of Illness

After a long period of sickness Allison O. Whitney of this city died Sunday night at the age of 67 years. He leaves to mourn his loss a wife, three daughters, Effie M. Purvis of Beach; Mary J. Clark, of Hodges, Montana, and Maebelle M. Chattin of Hyde Park, Vermont; one brother and three sisters, and a host of friends. He was born at Bangor, Maine, December 16, 1852, and removed to Minnesota with his parents when a boy, and when grown to young manhood married Miss Euphemia J. Wright, three daughters being born to them. He came to this county in 1904 and settled on a homestead, where his first wife died in 1907. In 1910 he married Miss Elizabeth Smith, who survives him. Failing health caused him to sell his farm and open a rooming house in Beach, which he was operating at the time of his death. In all his life here he made many friends by his uprightness and these testified to his worth by constant and unremitting attentions during his last illness. The funeral arrangements were under the direction of the Masonic lodge, of which order Mr. Whitney was an honored member, the ceremonies being held at the temple Tuesday at 1 p.m., a large attendance of friends and members being present. The interment was in Beach cemetery.


January 30th, 1920

Brilliant Church Wedding Feature of Week
Robert Zook Married to Margaret Fakler at St. John’s Church Last Week

A very pretty wedding occurred at St. John’s Catholic Church in this city at 9 a.m. January 21, when Margaret, second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Conrad Fakler, was united to Robert Zook by Father Hake. The ceremony being witnessed by a large gathering of friends of both families. As the wedding march burst from the organ the bridal couple passed down the aisle to the altar, little Ethel Fakler, a niece of the bride, acting as flower girl, leading the way, dressed in white and carrying an armful of pink carnations. The bride was handsomely gowned in white georgette over satin, wore a veil and wreath, and carried pink roses. Her sister Anna, as bridesmaid, wore pink georgette and carried white roses. The groom and his groomsman, Frank Zook, a brother, wore conventional black with boutonnières of red carnations. After the ceremony the bridal party and guests repaired to the Fakler home, where at 2 p.m. a sumptuous wedding dinner was served, plates being laid for 60, and the balance of the afternoon was given to rejoicing over the happy event. The color scheme at the home carried out the pink and white emphasized in the toilets and flowers of the bridal party. Since the wedding the bride and groom have been visiting at the bride’s home, but expect to be at home on the Zook farm March 1. The groom is a well known and popular young farmer southeast of Beach and the bride is well known both in country and town, being one of Golden Valley county’s most charming daughters. A host of friends of the young couple are wishing them a long, happy and prosperous voyage in married life.


January 30th, 1920

Late Sentinel Butte Happenings

Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Harper J. Burns, a little angel daughter on Monday morning, January 26. Mr. and Mrs. Burns are residents of Mott, this state, but Mrs. Burns has been visiting with her mother, Mrs. Fred Gilbert.


January 30th, 1920

Word has been received that Gene Kusick, formerly of Sentinel Butte, died at a hospital in Minneapolis, January 18.


February 6th, 1920

The Grim Reaper Calls Five This Week
Five Persons Died of Pneumonia Within Four Days and Short Term of Sickness
Influenza In Deadly form
Many Cases of Sickness Are Reported From Town and Country Homes

The grim reaper has been busy the past week during which time he has claimed four grown people and one infant through the dread pneumonia brought on by influenza, a disease that started out in mild form, but which is now most deadly and rapid in its action, and brought grief to many. Last Sunday, Mrs. Mons Haukaas, living just west of Golva, died of pneumonia after only three or four days illness, and leaving a family also sick with the disease, but happily all of whom are improving. She was buried in the Lutheran cemetery at Beach, Monday. Mrs. Haukaas was a very estimable woman and leaves a host of mourning friends.
On the same day Maud May Holdar, wife of William Holdar, living near Sentinel Butte, was called by death as a result of influenza, at the age of 27. She was buried at Beach on Tuesday, interment being in the local cemetery.
Last Saturday, Lillian N., the year-and-a-half-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Brown, died of influenza-pneumonia after but a short sickness. The little one was buried Monday from the Methodist church here and now lies in the Beach cemetery.
After but a few days illness with influenza, which brought on pneumonia, Hjalmar Haugland, a farmer living west of Golva, passed away Tuesday, at the age of 28 years. The funeral was held on Wednesday, interment being in the Lutheran cemetery at Beach.
Herald Clarin, a well known farmer living northwest of this city, died Tuesday of the dread pneumonia following an attack of influenza, after a short illness. Mr. Clarin was but 34 years old and was put down in the prime of vigorous manhood. He was buried here Wednesday afternoon from the parlors of Overstad & Hoverson.
From all part of the country reports of whole families being sick with the influenza are coming in, fortunately many of the cases being of light form, but in one or two instances pitiable conditions exist because of the sickness of the entire family and the scarcity of help. In this city many of the earlier reported cases have recovered and where there were many absent from school most of these have returned to duty, still new cases are constantly arising and there seems need of the utmost precaution at the first sign of the disease.


February 6th, 1920

Birthday Party

Miss Cathrine Stine, daughter of …v. and Mrs. G. Stine, celebrated her birthday Tuesday with a charming party to her young friends, some of them partaking of her hospitality and happiness, and bringing many items of esteem and friendship befitting the occasion. There were …. and game and all afternoon from the closing of school until past the vesper hour the Stine home was a scene of revelry. Delicate refreshments were served and the youngsters went home declaring they had had the bestest time ever.


February 6th, 1920

Interesting New of Ollie Folks

Mrs. L. L. Thayer received the sad news that her mother had passed away at her home at LaFarge, Wis.


February 6th, 1920

One of those things that come to men only, once a year, a birthday, happened to Guy Lovell last Saturday, and although he thought it was a state secret, a number of his friends got wind of the momentous period of time and that evening stormed the Lovell home and took possession. Once in control of the situation gifts were passed to the blushing celebrant, after which the guests made themselves at home with cards and dancing, the evening concluding with a fine lunch and the exchange of mutual felicitations over the surprising and happy event.


February 6th, 1920

We were called down over the phone the other day by the Stork for balling up his call in the Golva neighborhood the other week, when we had the winged god leaving a fine kidlet at the home of Richard Lorenze, when the precious burden was deposited safely in the arms of Mrs. Rupert Lorenze. While it is a kid in the family, yet there is quite a difference, and the Stork is mighty particular about his deliveries judging by the commotion caused by the tangling up of the two families. But everybody down Golva way is happy over the increase in population and well, we meant well, any way.


February 13th, 1920

Charles Kirkpatrick returned from Wisconsin and eastern points where he has been for some time, Wednesday.


February 13th, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. William Fry were happily surprised by a number of relatives and friends on Saturday evening of the past week. It was on the occasion of their tenth anniversary of their marriage. The evening was spend in a social manner and the event was enjoyed by all. At midnight refreshments were served.


February 13th, 1920

An Appreciation

To those kind friends who so generously helped us in so many ways during the sickness of our boy and did so much in the last sad hours of his stay with us; to those who sent flowers and gave us other testimonies of their sympathy, we extend our heartfelt appreciation and thanks, as these kindly things have lessened all possible the grief we suffer. Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Black


February 13th, 1920

Card of Thanks

We wish to take this opportunity to thank the many friends for the kindness and assistance shown during our recent bereavement. Thanks are also extended for the many floral offerings.
Mrs. Rose Clarin and Daughter,
Mrs. Elsie Clarin,
Mr. Oscar M. Clarin,
Mr. Anton Kelner


February 13th, 1920

Interesting News of the Ollie Folks

Miss Unis Shervn celebrated her sixth birthday by entertaining the following little girls on Monday afternoon: Eleanor Slater, Emily Stark, Phyllis Kees and Anna and Ethel Howard.

Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Rost are the proud parents over the arrival of a baby girl, born February 3rd.

The community was more than shocked to learn of the death of little Johnnie Black, which occurred at the Bismarck hospital Friday morning. He was taken to Bismarck on Wednesday and died Friday morning with a complication of diseases. The entire community extend its profound sympathy to Mr. and Mrs. Black in their deep sorrow and great loss.


February 13th, 1920

Doings of the People of Golva

Sebastian Stromeyer went to Sioux Falls, S.D., the first of the week to attend the funeral of a brother who recently died of the flu.


February 13th, 1920

Mrs. S. L. Bean of Edgar, Montana, came down Saturday to be with her sister, Mrs. Ray Black, at the funeral of her little son. She will remain a few days longer.


February 13th, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Black, father and mother of Ray Black, arrived Sunday from Fremont, Nebraska, to attend the funeral of little John Black, their grandson. They will remain until the end of the week.


February 13th, 1920

The home of Dr. and Mrs. R. W. Stough was brightened last Monday by the coming of a fine baby girl, and all are doing nicely, especially the doctor.


February 20th, 1920

Late Sentinel Butte Happenings

Tom Koshney of Alpha left Friday morning for Wisconsin where he will attend the funeral of his father. He can boast of the age of his father being over 100 years and died of old age and he had been immune from sickness the greater part of his life.

Mr. and Mrs. George B. Lamere are the proud parents of a baby boy, born on February 6th.


February 20th, 1920

Doings of the People of Golva

A little daughter arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Callahan on Monday February 9th.


February 20th, 1920

Word was received by Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder last Saturday of the death of the wife of their son Raymond of influenza at St. Paul, and Mrs. Schroeder left for that place Sunday to attend the funeral. Raymond Schroeder is well known here, where he has many friends. He is now a practicing attorney at St. Paul and rapidly forging to the front.


February 20th, 1920

Harry Smith, who with his wife, has spent the winter at Missoula, Mont., has returned to prepare for that big crop he will gather from his farm. While away the Smiths were blessed by the arrival of a fine baby girl, and are very happy over that event. Mrs. Smith will remain at Missoula until the weather becomes more settled.


February 20th, 1920

The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Englund were pained to hear of the death of one of their children, the details of which beyond the fact that the little one passed away early in the week and was buried Wednesday, could not be obtained at the time of going to press. The sympathy of all the friends of the bereaved parents goes out to them.


February 20th, 1920

Mrs. W. H. Dodrowski, living 128 miles southwest of the city, passed away Tuesday, having succumbed to the influenza, followed by pneumonia and other complications. She was born in Germany 37 years ago and has been a resident of this section for several years. She leaves a husband and nine children. Interment will be in the cemetery at St. Phillips.


February 27th, 1920

Mrs. Math Dietz returned home from Wisconsin where she was called about a month ago on account of the death of her mother. She was summoned back to Sentinel Butte by the illness of her family, who are suffering from the flu.


February 27th, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Oby and daughter, Anna, of Aberdeen, Wash., were guests at the P. O. Esmay home Thursday night. They left Friday morning for their homestead, 100 south of Miles City. The Oby’s made the trip back here for the purpose of burying their 23 year old son, Harry, who was killed in a logging camp in Washington. He was buried in the Carlyle cemetery on Saturday, February 7th. The Oby family will be remembered as having lived in the Horse Creek territory several years ago. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of their many friends in this community.


February 27th, 1920

The home of Howard Sprague was blessed with a fine baby girl last Sunday, and Howard will now go the church regularly in celebration of the event.


February 27th, 1920

Vernon Knapp of Bristol, S.D., was in the city Thursday on his way home after attending the funeral of his sister, Mrs. J. D. LaMere of Alpha, who died last Friday of influenza and buried Sunday at Alpha. Mrs. William Dyer of Marmarth, a sister of Mrs. LaMere, also attended the funeral, returned home Thursday. Mrs. LaMere was a woman of high character and many friends who sincerely regret her loss and tenderly sympathize with the relatives.


March 5th, 1920

Sentinel Butte Happenings

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Young blood of Allard, attended the funeral of Mrs. J. LaMere, Mrs. Youngblood’s sister-in-law, at Sentinel Butte last Thursday.

Mrs. J. LaMere of Sentinel Butte vicinity, died of pneumonia Monday February 16th. She was laid to rest in the Sentinel Butte cemetery Thursday, February 18th. She leaves to mourn her, three small children and her husband, also several minor relatives. Sincerest sympathy is extended to those bereaved by this sudden grief.


March 5th, 1920

Interesting News of Ollie Folks

Death of Mrs. Lee Hooper

The news of the sudden death of Mrs. Lee Hopper came as a shock to the whole community. Mrs. Hopper passed away at her old home at Oblong, Ill., Monday morning, February …, after a brief illness of a few days, the cause of death being influenza. …ulalia May Ikemire was born July …, 1887 at Oblong, Ill. She was married to Lee Hopper, December …, 1906 at Effingham, Ill. They came west in the fall of 1908, and moved onto a farm four miles west of Ollie, where the family resided until November 1919, when they left for Oblong, Ill., to spend the winter. Mrs. Hopper was well and most favorably known, having lived in this vicinity for so many years. As a wife and mother she was devoted to her family. Those familiar with her …. readily testify to her easy …dliness and optimistic disposition. She was a most valuable and ..ted member of the United Breth. Church and a great worker in the Ladies’ Aid society, and her departing leaves a distinct gap in the ranks. Rejoice, however, in the thought that our loss is to her promotion. Mrs. Hopper is survived by her husband, Mr. Lee Hopper, two children, George L. and Ruby I. of Ollie, her mother, three sisters and two brothers, Chinook, Mont., and a sister. Mrs. Vernie Hopper, of this city. The funeral was held at Oblong, Ill. A deep and sincere sympathy of the community goes out to the bereaved family in the hour of their sorrow.


March 5th, 1920

Ollie News Items

Marion and Vernie Hopper received the sad news of their mother’s death this week, which occurred at Oblong, Ill., of influenza. Mrs. E. J. Hopper will be remembered as having visited the Hopper families here last fall. The community extends its sympathy to the bereaved ones.


March 5th, 1920

Arvid

Mrs. Clark and James Crook, received word Thursday of the sudden death of their mother, Mrs. Martha Crook. Mrs. Crook is well known here, as she made her home with her son James until the last three years, when she moved to Foley, Minn. Death was caused by the flu. They have the sympathy of their many friends in this vicinity.


March 12th, 1920

The Last Roll Call
Veteran of Civil War and Former Golden Valley Comrade, Died March 4

At Jamestown last Thursday passed away Captain Charles A. Near, at the age of 76 years. Captain Near was the father of Fred E. and Ray Near of this county, and was highly respected by all who knew him, he having been a resident of this section for about ten years. He was born at Wampsville, N.Y., June 23, 1844, and was married to S. Augusta Perry, May 9, 1866, and eight children were born to this union. He served four years in the civil war, having enlisted when but 17 years old, emerging from the conflict with credit and merited promotion. Two years ago his health failed and it was necessary for him to receive the care of the sanitarium, where he had been until his death. Captain Near was a staunch American all the way through and loved the flag as only those who fought for it can. He was buried at Hurley, S.D., March 7.


March 12th, 1920

Late Sentinel Butte Happenings

Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Boisen are the proud parents of a darling baby girl, born in Dickinson, Sunday evening. All concerned are doing nicely.

The sad news has been recently received that Mrs. Harley Stevens of Scofield, Utah, formerly Miss Hazel Miller of this town, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Miller, had the misfortune to lose by sudden death, her infant daughter, Lorraine. Mrs. Miller will leave this week to care for the bereaved family.


March 12th, 1920

Miss Nana S. Cushing, after spending a week with her father and sister went to Fargo to visit her sister, from whose house she will be married March 17, to Mr. Basil Magee, a young Kidder county stock rancher. Mrs. Cushing, who had been at a Bismarck hospital for a few days, joined her at Bismarck and the two went on to Fargo together. Mrs. Cushing expects to return to Beach early in April.


March 19th, 1920

Death of Adolph Attletweed Shock To Friends
Sick But Eight Days With Influenza, Followed by the Dread Pneumonia
Died Early Monday Morning
Leaves Many Devoted Friends to Mourn

The community was shocked last Monday morning to learn that the grim reaper had claimed Adolph K. Attletweed during the night. Eight days before Mr. Attletweed left the bank complaining of an attack of the influenza, but through the week, while he was reported as being a very sick man, no one believed the end to be so near, and his many friends hoped for his speedy recovery. But grim pneumonia had seized him for its own, and all that skilled medical attendance could do prevailed not against the attack, and the sufferer passed quietly away at about 2:10 Monday morning. Mr. Attletweed was born at Decorah, Iowa, April 23, 1889, and passed his boyhood and early manhood there. He came to Beach six years ago and entered the employ of the First National Bank as assistant cashier, and became cashier in February, 1919. In this position he made a friend of every patron of the bank, and his familiar face, genial smile and courteous manner will be missed by these as they go to the cashier’s window in the course of business. Last July Mr. Attletweed was married at Decorah to Miss Grace Lomen, one of the charming young women of that place, and who as a resident of this city, has also gained many warm friends, whose sincere sympathy goes out to her in this dark hour. In addition to the wife, deceased leaves his mother, who resides here, two brothers and two sisters: O. C. and George Attletweed, and Mrs. Oscar Heller of this city, and Mrs. H. E. Bualson of Silvana, Washington. The funeral is being held today from the home of the deceased, interment being in the Lutheran cemetery of this city. Adolph Attletweed was a most likeable man. Of high moral character and of splendid intellectual powers, he was of the kind that make good, substantial citizens. He had a strong community interest in local affairs and was numbered among those who stood for the best and for the development of the city and country along business lines that stand for progress and substantial growth. In his home life he was a devoted son and husband and brother, and domestic interests appealed to him strongly. His untimely taking off is a matter of general regret for it is not believed he had an enemy, while his friends were counted by all who knew him.


March 19th, 1920

Late Sentinel Butte Happenings

Mrs. J. A. Jensen of Scollsmade, N.D., spent a few days at the Henry Lehman home enroute home from Washington state, where she attended the funeral of her brother, Ed. Evans. Mr. Evans was formerly a rancher near Medora and his many friends will grieve to hear of his sudden death.


March 19th, 1920

Six Persons Frozen To Death In Monday Storm
Three Tragedies Present Stories of Sacrifice to Save Lives of Others
Boy and Girl and Indian Mother Died For Their Loved Ones

Five children and one woman are reported so far as victims of Monday’s storm in this state. Near Ryder the four boys of Gus Wohlka left school Monday afternoon in a wagon for home, but became lost in the storm. After wrapping the younger boys in what robes they had, the oldest boy went for help, but soon got lost and, with the other boys, was found frozen the next day. Near Center, Oliver county, Hazel Miner, an 18-year-old heroine, perished in the storm while seeking aid for her two brothers aged 11 and 8 years. These children, too, had been at school and started home in a wagon, but soon became lost in the storm, and it was then that the brave girl covered up her brothers, even sacrificing her own coat, and went in search of aid, only to be found the next day frozen to death not far from her home. The father of these children had gone to the school on horseback to make sure they got home safely, and had put them in the wagon and then went back to the shed for his horse. When he returned to the front of the school the rig was gone, and supposing the children had started for home, followed after them, but could not trace them anywhere. He aroused the neighbors and forty men scoured the neighborhood of the school all Monday night, but it was not until Tuesday afternoon the rig was found overturned with the two children still alive, but with faces and hands frozen. Later the daring sister was found as she had fallen exhausted in her struggle against the storm, dead. The sixth death was that of an Indian woman near Devils Lake, who had started home in a wagon with her three-year-old son. The team became exhausted. The child was found alive, wrapped in the mother’s clothing, while the mother perished. Means of communication all over the state are wrecked and it may be that other tales of tragedies like these will come in as communication is reestablished.


March 26th, 1920

Late Sentinel Butte Happenings

Beloved Carrington Girl Called to Eternal Rest

Grace Horney died Tuesday afternoon after an illness of more than three years. Funeral Thursday. Grace Mae Horney died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Horney at 8:40 p.m. Tuesday afternoon of nephritis. The end, which was not unexpected, came quietly. For more than three long years this patient girl had waged an unequal battle with the grim disease and through it all bore her suffering with a fortitude that was remarkable. Last October she was forced to her bed and from that time until death claimed her she constantly grew weaker. Possessed of a true Christian character that reflected her cheerfulness and strong determination at all times she bore up bravely while all that medical skill and human power could do was being done to save the young life and it was only this strong determination that kept her up through it all. Even at times when the pain was greatest she bore it uncomplainingly. Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 p.m., from the Methodist church, Rev. Frank S. Hollett officiating, and the body will be laid at rest in the Carrington cemetery. Grace Mae Horney was born in New Richmond, Indiana, on Jan. 19, 1896. In 1897 her parents moved to Carrington and here she has resided ever since with the exception of about five years when the family lived at Sentinel Butte. She united with the Methodist Church in 1907 and no church has had a more faithful member than she. She received her education in the Carrington schools, taking business education, and for a time before her health failed she worked as stenographer in several offices. A father, mother and brother Ralph are left to mourn her. Ralph is a sailor and was not able to attend the funeral on account of having to leave on a ship the day the sad news was received. An aunt, Mrs. William Care of Minneapolis, was able to attend and came at first summons.


March 26th, 1920

An Appreciation

In the trials and grief the ministration of friends comes home to us with increased force and we cannot refrain from expressing our appreciation to those who were so kind and whose attention during the sickness and death of our son, husband and brother did so much to lighten the darkened hour. No friends could have done more; none could have been more sympathetic and helpful in every way and our hearts go out in thankfulness that we live in such a community of devoted people.
Mrs. O. C. Attletweed, Sr.,
Mrs. A. K. Attletweed,
Mr. and Mrs. O. C. Attletweed,
Mr. and Mrs. O. A. Heller,
Rev. and Mrs. H. E. Baulson,
George O. Attletweed


March 26th, 1920

The home of J. J. Bartley in this city was made happy over the arrival Wednesday night of a bouncing baby girl to bless the lives of Mr. and Mrs. James Powers, who are guests at the Bartley home, Mrs. Powers being a daughter of the family. James is as proud of the event as any father ever was and the many friends of the two families are congratulating everybody over the wonderful happening.


March 26th, 1920

Doings of the People of Golva

Charles and Warren Kirkpatrick arrived on Wednesday for a brief visit with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. N. Kirkpatrick, of Golva. They expect to leave for Canada in a few days.


March 26th, 1920

A baby girl arrived at the Dryden home last Sunday and everybody is happy and doing well.


March 26th, 1920

Marshall Miller was not quite right in the store last Monday all because an eight and one-half-pound baby girl came to his home Sunday as a recognition of his strong religious proclivities.


April 2nd, 1920

Late Sentinel Butte Happenings

Mrs. W. A. Hart and Mrs. Jackson of Alpha, received the sad news that their sister-in-law, Mrs. R. J. Ash died suddenly from an acute illness and were summoned to her funeral. They left Wednesday for Butler, S. Dak., and were uncertain as to when they would return. Mrs. Ash leaves two small children.


April 2nd, 1920

Charles and Warren Kirkpatrick, who were visiting their parents at their farm near Golva, left the first of the week for Canada, where they expect to work during the summer.


April 9th, 1920

Word has been received by A. E. Swan that his wife’s mother died at her home in Minnesota, Tuesday night. Mrs. Swan went to her mother’s bedside last week, and her many friends will grieve with her over her great loss.


April 9th, 1920

Interesting News of Ollie Folks

Mrs. Laura Orton Dies

Mrs. Laura Orton, known as ……Orton, died of heart failure Friday afternoon at the home of … E. E. Orton, six miles west of Ollie. Full account of her death will appear in next week’s issue.

Mrs. Ikemire, of Chinook, Mont., ….ed Friday for a visit with her sister, Mrs. Vernie Hooper, and family. She is on her way home from Oblong, Ill, where she was called on account of the death of her daughter, Mrs. Lee Hopper.


April 9th, 1920

Thelen News

A baby boy arrived at the home of Mrs. and Mrs. Herman Geyer last Tuesday.


April 16th, 1920

Birthdays Celebrated By North Side bunch
Two Young Ladies Cause Joint Observation of Event and a Double Feast.
Their Friends In the Fullness of Things, Rejoice and Congratulate

The Nutter house on the north side was a scene of great festivity Monday evening, the occasion being the celebration of the birthdays of the Misses Grace DeLong and Vera Banker, of the high school faculty. Three big cakes “all lit up” with candles graced the table in front of the young lady celebrants, two being the gift of the Misses Nutter and one from the mother of Miss DeLong. But while the cakes were the “cynosure of all eyes,” the flow of congratulations, and other things, made the occasion marked for its “intelligencia,” sparkling wit, and things like that. None of the guests were so impolite as to count the candles, but suffice it to say they made a brilliant illumination in which the honored guests looked most charming. Tom Scott won the piece of cake containing the “diamond ring,” and therefore is doomed to join the ranks of the Benedicts at an early date, while, strange fate, Miss Banker nearly swallowed the button in her piece of cake, which betokened a continuous maidenhood, in spite of all signs to the contrary. In behalf of the assembled “regulars” “Dad” Dawson blessed the happy day - and cake - and in choice American Legion diction thanked the thoughtfulness of Mrs. DeLong for her contribution, while R. M. Lewis as he helped himself to another piece of cake, wished the young ladies many returns of the day. Several important announcements of approaching birthdays on the part of members of the company were well received by all, but the landladies, and George McClellan was so filled with the goodness of the occasion that he advanced by several months the date of his arrival on the earth only to be shown up as a grafter by Judge Halliday. Some of the bachelors present, having in view the high cost of living, deprecated the use of candles on the cake when it came their turn to celebrate, but “Pa” Clagget averred that was not a good reason, and vouchsafed the information that he would not blush for the necessary candles, if he only got the cake.


April 16th, 1920

Late Sentinel Butte Happenings

Mrs. W. A. Hart and her sister, Mrs. Jackson, of Alpha, returned Friday from Butler, S.D. where they were called about ten days ago on account of the death of her sister-in-law.


April 16th, 1920

Thelen News

Miss Elsie Geyer was surprised last Wednesday evening when a number of the neighbors gathered at her home in memory of her birthday.


April 16th, 1920

Interesting News of Ollie Folks

Obituary Of Mrs. Orton

…..ra Ellen Bigelow was born at ….Mary’s, Ohio, October 8, 1850, and died at the home of her son, …Orton, of Ollie, Montana, on …2nd, 1920, and at time of death was 69 years, 5 months and 25 days. ….was united in marriage to …..m Orton, of Greenbush, Minn., …. 6th, 1870. To this union was born six children, four sons and two daughters, all of whom mourn her loss. They are William, Eliza A., Elmer E., of Ollie, Luther E., of Billings, Mont., ….e M. of Robinsdale, Minn., and … J., of Steward, Minn. She is survived by one brother, Elmer Bieglow, of Princeton, Minn. Her …nd died eleven years ago. The deceased became a member of the Methodist Episcopal church at …..bush, Minn., in 1874, of which …mination she remained a true and faithful member until two years ago when she united, by letter with … B. church at Ollie. She was a …. member of the Rebecca lodge ….inceton. Her remains were shipped to her home at Princeton, Minn., for …., accompanied by her sons, El… and William Orton. The community extends it heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved relatives.

Mrs. and Mrs. Norman Rost are the proud parents of a ten pound baby girl, born Wednesday, April 7.

T. M. Solum and family were dinner guests at the C. O. Brady home Friday, the occasion being Mrs. Brady’s birthday.


April 16th, 1920

Married

LeRoy Seeley and Miss Florence Rood, both of this place, were married at the Damon Hotel at Baker, Wednesday afternoon, Rev. H. E. Chappell of the Methodist church officiating. The young people are very prominent in this section of the country and have many friends who unite in wishing them happiness and prosperity in the journey together through life.


April 23rd, 1920

Interesting News of Ollie Folks

Announcements were received this week announcing the birth of a son, “Arthur Henry,” on Sunday, April 11th, to Mr. and Mrs. Rupert Groh, at Richland Center, Wis.


April 30th, 1920

Letson-Paulson Wedding Social Event
Well Known Young Beach Couple Join the Great Benedictine Army

A very pretty wedding occurred at the Paulson home in this city last Tuesday evening, at 7:30 o’clock, when Miss Vera Paulson was united in marriage to Dr. Russell C. Letson, of Bismarck, by Rev. Charles Richter of the Congregational church. The house was handsomely decorated in ferns, smilax and white and yellow flowers, a corner in the living room being transformed into an impromptu altar for the ceremony. As the hour for the ceremony approached Mrs. Charles Carlson, a sister of the bride, played the Mendelsohn wedding march, and the bride, attended by Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Noyes, descended the stairs and took position at the altar, where they were joined by the groom. The ring ceremony was used and after the solemn event had been concluded the friends of the happy pair smothered them with congratulations, after which a delicious wedding supper, with plates for 16, was enjoyed. Dr. and Mrs. Letson will be at home at Bismarck after June 1. The bride and groom are both well and favorably known in Beach, having grown up in this city, the bride being the sister of Miss Cora Paulson and the groom, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Letson, and it is certain that no young couple have started out in married life with more good wishes than they.


April 30th, 1920

Late Sentinel Butte Happenings

Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Evans and two children of Chama, left Sunday for VanHook, N.D. where they were summoned at the sad news of Mr. Evan’s mothers sudden death. They will be away for some time visiting other relatives enroute home.


April 30th, 1920

Rev. J. W. Dudley Is Called Away Suddenly
Smitten By Paralysis While On Way to Visit Friends in Country

The sudden death of Rev. J. W. Dudley last Friday has cast a gloom over the Carlyle neighborhood, where he has resided for some years, and where he grew large in the estimation of the people. Rev. Dudley was on his way in an automobile from the Virts to the Charles Fulton homes when death came without notice, the cause being paralysis, he having never entirely recovered from an attack of that disease three years ago. Mr. Dudley was 64 years old at the time of his death. Rev. Dudley was born January 24, 1856, and departed this life April 23, 1920, at the age of 64 years, 3 months and 29 days. His early life was spent in farming near Stone Bluff, Ind. On January 8, 1877, he was united in marriage with Clara A. Switzer, also of Stone Bluff. To this union was born three daughters, Grace, Daisy and Pearl. He was always a christian and in 1896 was ordained to the ministry of the First Christian church. In 1908 he organized the First Christian church at Carlyle, Montana, the first wor (sic) that was ever held in that neighborhood, and kept up the work at that surrounding points until failing health compelled his retirement. He was always greatly interested and a leader in the civil and religious life of the neighborhood in which he lived. For several years he was president of the Anti- Saloon League of Linden, Indiana. Was also president of the Carlyle Commercial club from the time of its foundation until a paralytic stroke in June 1916, made further public work impossible. His wife was called to the heavenly home April 18, 1901. He is survived by the three daughters, seventeen grand children, one brother, two sisters and a host of neighbors and friends, who mourn his departure.


April 30th, 1920

Interesting News of Ollie Folks

Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Rid…er, twin boys, on Friday, April …..

The twin boys of Mrs. and Mrs. Os……..enhower died this week, and …… was made in the Ollie cem……. Monday afternoon, April 26. Sympathy of the entire community goes out to the bereaved parents.


May 7th, 1920

Doings of The People of Golva

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry Smeltzer of Carlyle, are the parents of a baby girl, born last week. Mrs. Smeltzer of Beach, who has been caring for her, returned home Tuesday.


May 7th, 1920

Interesting News of Ollie Folks

Mr. and Mrs. Templeton are the happy parents over the arrival of a girl, born Thursday, April 29th.


May 7th, 1920

Grandpa Harry Wall is feeling fine these days over the news from Westmore, Montana, to the effect that a fine baby boy arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Caldwell last Tuesday.


May 7th, 1920

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Jess Hougen celebrated May day in great shape, the occasion being the arrival of a fair Mayflower in the person of a fine baby girl, whose beauty is vouched for when it is said to be the image of her father.


May 14th, 1920

Late Sentinel Butte Happenings

The sad news was recently received that the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Lindsay of Fargo, formerly of Sentinel Butte, took suddenly ill and passed away Thursday afternoon. Mrs. Petty, Mrs. Lindsay’s sister, of Sentinel Butte vicinity, was summoned to the funeral and left Friday morning on No. 4 from Beach.


May 14th, 1920

Miss Nellie Golden Dies of Pneumonia

Miss Nellie Golden, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Golden, died at her home some forty miles northwest of Beach, near Skaar, N.D., May 7, 1920 of pneumonia, at the age of 14 years, 1 month and 10 days. She leaves a father, mother, four sisters and other relatives and many friends to mourn her death. Her uncle, Mr. Golden from Wisconsin, came just before she passed away. Nellie was loved by all who knew her and will be greatly missed by the community. The funeral was conducted at the home by Rev. C. A. Lucas, Sunday, May 9th. The service was largely attended.


May 14th, 1920

Doings of the People of Golva

Earl Kirkpatrick returned Saturday from different points in the west where he has spent the winter.


May 14th, 1920

Thelen News

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Bast are the proud parents of a baby boy, born to them April 29.


May 14th, 1920

The body of Mrs. Anton Sokoloski was brought to Beach on No. 3 Wednesday afternoon, she having succumbed to an operation at the Bismarck hospital. Funeral services will be held at the church at St. Phillips on Friday of this week.


May 21st, 1920

Death of Mrs. Alguire Sr.

Wednesday evening L. J. Alguire received the sad news that his mother had died suddenly at Los Angeles, Calif., Tuesday night and that the remains would be taken to Sioux Falls, S.D., for burial. She had been spending the winter on the coast and was in good health when her three daughters left her last week, the mother expecting to return a few days later with a lady friend, so the news of her death is all the more startling. She leaves four sons, two of whom reside here, and four daughters.


May 21st, 1920

Sentinel Butte News

Russell Kirkpatrick returned home Monday evening from Dunn Center, N.D., where he has been teaching school.


May 21st, 1920

Death of George Holven

From the Jackson County Journal, published at Black River Falls, Wis., the sad news is gleaned of the death of George Holven, at one time a popular resident of this county, at Long Beach, Cal., May 5. On account of his poor health Mr. Holven and family moved to California, but the fight was against him. He leaves a wife and two children, father, mother, a half brother, of Long Beach, Cal., and Mrs. Ella Thompson and Edward Holven, sister and brother, of this county, the entire family having at one time been residents of Golden Valley county. Many old friends will sympathize with the stricken wife and other relatives in the loss of one who was highly esteemed by all who knew him.


May 21st, 1920

Interesting News of Ollie Folks

Word was received in the city of the birth of a son, William John, on May 7th, to Mr. and Mrs. Ray Gammon, of Big Horn, Mont. The Gammon’s were former residents of Ollie.


May 21st, 1920

Carl Olson, a former resident of this county, died at Medicine Hat last Sunday, a brief telegram to relatives here, bringing the news. He was well known in the county and had many friends to regret his untimely death.


May 28th, 1920

Howard Loebe Instantly Killed by Lightning Bolt
George Loebe Knocked Senseless
Revives to Find Brother Dead Near By

The community was shocked Tuesday afternoon to learn that Howard Loebe, a young brother of George Loebe, had been killed by lightning while working in the field during the thunder storm of that day. Young Loebe was between 16 and 17 years old, and came out from Delaware only a few weeks ago to work on the farm with his brother, and during that short time had made friends of all who knew him. It appears that George Loebe and his brother were using a large drag to which two teams were attached when the storm came up, but wishing to finish the field, kept on in spite of the storm, each driving one of the teams. There was a blinding flash, and the next thing George Loebe knew he was lying on the ground and the teams had disappeared, except one horse, from which harness had been ripped by the lightning, but which otherwise was uninjured. Mr. Loebe found that he was badly stunned, being unable to use one arm, and his whole side being numb. Seeing his brother lying on the ground near by, he called to him, but getting no response, crawled to his side, only to find he was dead, the bolt of lightning having struck him on the side of his head and passing through his body, and ripping his shoes to pieces, entered the ground. Although badly crippled George Loebe managed to shoulder the dead brother and started for the house, but fainted on the way. Regaining consciousness, he managed to get the body to the house and summon aid by phone, and he and the body of his brother were brought to town, where “Slim” spent a day in bed, although the use of his arm has been practically restored and he is not suffering any serious effects of the tremendous shock he received. One of the peculiarities of the attack of the lightning was that although it killed the boy and took the harness from one of the horses, and the others ran off, none of the animals appear to be injured in any way. The remains of Howard Leobe were taken to Delaware, Thursday by his brother George and will be placed in the old home cemetery.


May 28th, 1920

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Chris Bares, who live near Golva, has been brightened by the arrival of a fine boy this week.


May 28th, 1920

Robert Alguire left the latter part of last week for Sioux Falls, S.D., to attend the funeral of his mother, who died suddenly in California and was sent to the old home at Sioux Falls for burial.


June 4th, 1920

Late Sentinel Butte Happenings

Miss Florence Kirkpatrick left Sunday night for Beach, where she has accepted a position as office girl with Dr. Foster. She is relieving Miss Hazel Larson, who will soon leave for the west.


June 4th, 1920

Joe Kukowski is feeling pretty frisky these days all because a strapping baby boy arrived at his house Wednesday morning, all his other children being girls. Mother and boy are doing fine and Joe is hitting only the “high place” on the road.


June 4th, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Dilley are rejoicing over the birth of their first born, a fine baby girl.


June 11th, 1920

Brilliant Wedding is Feature of Thursday
Ernest Geyer and Miss Grace Selsvold United in Pretty Church Ceremony

A very pretty wedding was solemnized yesterday afternoon at the Norwegian Lutheran church when Miss Grace Selsvold, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Selsvold, well known old settlers living southeast of Beach, was united to Ernest Geyer, a prosperous young man of that vicinity, by Rev. H. J. Trinklein. The bridal party entered the church led by two flower girls, followed by the groom and his best man, after whom came the bride on the arm of her father, followed by two bridesmaids, Mrs. Thor G. Plomason playing the wedding march. The ring ceremony was performed under a floral arch at the church altar, the ensemble forming a very pretty picture. The bride wore white geogette with veil, and carried American beauty roses, the maids being similarly attired. After the ceremony the bridal party and a number of friends repaired to the Selsvold home where a sumptuous dinner was served and in the evening a reception to a large number of friends and neighbors marked the end of a very happy day for all concerned.


June 11th, 1920

Interesting News Of Ollie Folks
Mrs. Josephine Rose

Josephine Peterson was born in …den, August 17, 1842. She was …ried to Mr. Carl G. Rose, an …gelistic singer in 1862. They came to the United States in 1870, ….ing at Lake View, Iowa, until …. came to Montana as a pioneer ….907. To this union were born fourteen children, seven of whom are living. The greatest sorrow came when her …and was called to that blessed … nineteen years ago, and she …… been waiting for the Master to …non her all these years. She was converted at the age of …. and lived a true christian life … the time of her death. She was a member of the Swedish Baptist church. She was never too tired to … the sick and to help those in …. No one was ever turned away from her door hungry. She was a …. lover of children, flowers and …. and all the finer things in nature and her books were all of a high …. Her work in this world is fin…. and it was well done. She has … to meet Jesus, to whom she al…… talked and loved so well. She leaves seven children to mourn the loss of a dear, loving ….er, Mrs. A. W. Nash, Story…., Iowa; Mrs. G. E. Gustafson, … View, Iowa; Mrs. We. E. John…., San Pedro, Cal.; Jr. R. Rose, …mton, N.D.; D. H. Rose, Lau….., Iowa; C. G. Rose, Ollie, Mont., Mrs. I. A. Morris, Ollie, Mont., one sister and brother. Grandma Rose as she was known…., died at the home of her son, C. …..of Ollie, on May 31st, 1920, … 77 years, 9 months and 14 days. Funeral services were held at the … church on Wednesday after… and Thursday morning her re….s were shipped back to the old …. at Lake View, Iowa, for in….ent. The community extends its deepest …..pathy to the bereaved ones in … great sorrow.

Rev. Bovey of Carlyle, conducted the funeral services of the late Mrs. Josephine Rose, Wednesday afternoon.


June 11th, 1920

George Loebe returned Sunday from the east, where he took the body of his brother for burial.


June 11th, 1920

The home of Joe Peplinski was brightened last Friday by the arrival of a bouncing baby boy, and Joe wears a grin a yard wide, especially as all concerned are doing well.


June 11th, 1920

Banker Welch of Carlyle, came near giving the bank away last Thursday when the stork left at his house a fine baby boy. However, he is said to be settling down to routine affairs again in good shape.


June 11th, 1920

Just as this issue goes to press it is learned that word has been received by Mr. S. R. Morris that his father had died at his home in Los Angeles Saturday, at the ripe old age of 80 years. The friends of Mr. Morris will sympathize in his loss.


June 11th, 1920

Monson-Eide Announcement
Fargo Forum

Announcement of the approaching marriage of Miss Irene Eide of Beach, N.D., and Fern Monson, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Monson, of Fargo, was made at a party given by Miss Doris Tillotson, Tenth avenue south, Friday afternoon. The guests included the members of La Chom sorority of Fargo college, of which Miss Eide is a member, and Mrs. Leigh Monson, who was an invited guest. The announcement was made by Little Miss Constance Hallman, was presented each guest with a red rose, around which was wrapped a paper bearing the announcement, written in the form of a proclamation. The wedding date has been set for June 30, at the bride’s home at Beach. The hours were passed informally and the hostess served luncheon. A color note of red and white was carried our in the decorations. Miss Eide is a member of the Junior class of Fargo college. Mr. Monson is an alumnus of the college and is a member of the U. of A. fraternity.


June 18th, 1920

Among the interesting marital events this week was the marriage yesterday morning of James M. Shea and Miss Marie L. Cassady, both of the Wibaux country, the ceremony being performed by Father Hake, the priest at Wibaux being away at this time. A feature of the event was the fine music rendered by the Wibaux church choir, of which Miss Cassady is a member. After the ceremony the bridal party repaired to the bride’s home and properly celebrated the event.


June 18th, 1920

Doings of the People of Golva

Mr. and Mrs. T. Kirkpatrick entertained the young people of the neighborhood at a dancing party on Wednesday evening. At midnight a very dainty lunch was served and all went home voting Mr. and Mrs. Kirkpatrick royal entertainers.


June 18th, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. T. Kirkpatrick left Thursday for a short visit at the home of their daughter, Mrs. Clark Reed, who lives over the line in Canada.


June 18th, 1920

Card of Thanks

We wish to express our sincere thanks and appreciation to the friends and neighbors for their many kind acts and expressions during the period of illness and death of our mother. Mrs. I. A. Morris and Carl Rose.


June 18th, 1920

The sad news was received here this week of the death of Mr. and Mrs. Elsworth Foltz’s little daughter, at their home at Rochester, Minn. The child fell into a tub of hot water and was scalded to death. Their many friends in this community extend sympathy to the grief stricken parents.


June 18th, 1920

Mrs. Harry Smith and baby are back from Missoula where she has been spending the winter and where the little one was born.


June 18th, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Geyer, who were married last week, after a few days spent at the home of the bride went to Fargo, Saturday to live. Mr. Geyer being employed there. The Advance follows to keep them posted on the old home doings.


June 25th, 1920

Witzig-Stewart
Popular Young Lady of Beach Joins the Happy Throng of Newlyweds

Announcements have just been received of the marriage of Miss Margaret Agnes Witzig, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Witzig, to Ralph Stewart. The marriage ceremony was performed at Glasgow, Mont., and the happy couple will be at home at Mandak, Mont., after July 15. Miss Witzig is one of the most progressive and successful young business women of Beach. While industrious she has not allowed the pursuit of wealth to deprive her of the time necessary for social affairs and has a host of friends in this vicinity. Congratulations.


June 25th, 1920

Bonnie View Notes

Albert Meyer received the sad news of the death of his mother at Norwalk, Wisconsin where he went to attend the funeral. Mrs. Meyer had many friends here, formerly from Norwalk, who were sadly disheartened by hearing the news, and all extend sympathy to Albert and other members of the family.


June 25th, 1920

Doings of the People of Golva

A bright little 8 pound son arrived at the John Timms home in Golva, June 19. Mother and baby are doing fine.


June 25th, 1920

Interesting News of Ollie Folks

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Stark are the happy parents over the arrival of a baby girl, born Tuesday, June 15th.


June 25th, 1920

Mrs. F. O. Gift, Mrs. L. H. West, and P. O. Esmay received the sad news of their mother’s death, which …..rred at her home at Valley, …, Tuesday morning. Mrs. Gift and Mr. Esmay left Wednesday ….ning for that place.


July 2nd, 1920

Popular Young Lady of Beach Married Wedn’sdy
Acquaintance Formed at Fargo College Results in a Most Happy Union

Wednesday at high noon the ceremony was performed which united in holy wedlock Miss Irene Eide of this city, and Mr. Fern Monson of Fargo. The vows were taken at the Methodist church and were witnessed by a small circle of friends, the clergyman in this instance being no less a person than Dr. E. Lee Howard, president of Fargo College, under whose guiding care both of the contracting parties made their way through that higher institution of learning. The services were opened by Mrs. T. Plomason singing, “Beloved, It Is Morn,” followed by Miss Cecile Cook singing, “Oh, Promise Me.” At the appointed time Mrs. A. E. Swan, who presided at the piano, accompanied the wedding party to their placed by rendering Mendolshon’s wedding march, the bride on the arm of her father, who gave her away on joining the groom in a very beautiful arbor which had been improvised at the Altar. There were no attendants. The bride was charmingly gowned, carried a corsage bouquet of roses and blossoms, and the united party under the arbor made a beautiful and impressive picture. The ring ceremony was used. Immediately after the service the bridal party, with a few special friends, went to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Eide, parents of the bride, where a delicious wedding dinner was served. The afternoon train carried the young couple to western Montana where they will join the parents of the groom and together make a tour of the Yellowstone Park. Miss Eide lived in Beach for a number of years, and her sterling worth made for her a host of friends. On graduating from the high school she went to Fargo College, where the acquaintance of Mr. Monson was made and which resulted in this union. Mr. Monson is a member of the firm of the Monson Trunk Co, of Fargo, is a progressive young businessman and deservedly popular with all classes of his home city. Both here and at Fargo the happy couple were the recipients of many tokens of esteem from their many friends, which attest their popularity in the communities where they are known. They will be at home in Fargo after August 1st. The Advance wishes to be counted among the number who unite in wishing them a life of happiness and prosperity.


July 2nd, 1920

Chester Wallace and Miss Henson Married

On Monday at the residence of the groom’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joe H. Wallace, on the White-Wallace ranch on Cabin creek, Chester Wallace, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wallace, and Miss Florence Henson, of Tacoma, Wash., were united in marriage, the Rev. H. P. Kayser of Terry officiating. The groom is a well known young man of steady habits and given to steady industry. He was a member of the 23rd Engineers, spending about 18 months overseas; two years in the service. The bride is one of Prairie county’s progressive teachers, and both of the young people are high respected and have the good will of everyone who knows them. The newlyweds will go to house-
keeping on the farm of the groom, which lies just north of the holdings of the White-Wallace ranch company. The Forum family is delighted to learn of the marriage of this worthy couple and extends to them hearty congratulations and the wish that life may be long, joyous and prosperous for them. The above clipping was sent to The Advance together with the information that Harry Wallace, a brother of the groom, and Hazel Wallace a cousin, were attendants of the happy couple during the ceremony. Chester Wallace has a host of friends in this vicinity who will join with his other friends in extending congratulations and best wishes.


July 2nd, 1920

Married

The marriage of Frank E. Seeley, of Chalk Buttes, S. Dak., and Miss Vera F. Grow, of Baker, Mont., took place Tuesday evening, June 22nd, at the home of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. L. N. Grow. The marriage ceremony was performed by justice L. C. Burns, and following the service a delicious luncheon was served the bridal couple and invited guests. Miss Mary Drey and Mr. Lon Inman, of Baker, acted as bridesmaid and best man. The young couple are well and favorably known in this community, having lived here several years before moving to Baker. The groom has recently acquired a farm near Chalk Buttes, S.D., and the happy couple left the following morning for that place where they will make their home. Many friends extend congratulations and wish them a long and happy life.


July 2nd, 1920

Palmer Eide of Fargo, came to Beach the latter part of the week to visit friends and relatives and also to be present at the marriage of his sister which took place on Wednesday of this week.


July 9th, 1920

Former City Teacher Is Married In Iowa
Miss Vera Banker and Edward Trepp Now at Home in Wimbledon

Wimbledon News: Edward Trepp and his bride, who were married at Des Moines, Ia., on June 23, arrived here Wednesday evening and though their arrival was cunningly planned to be an unobserved event, some sentinel was on the job and their friends surprised them with the customary charivari. The Des Moines Register contained the following account of the marriage: “The marriage of Miss Vera Banker and Mr. Edward Trepp of Wimbledon, N.D., took place Wednesday at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Belknap, 1169 Fourteenth Street place with the Rev. W. A. SchnMenberger officiating. “The bride was attired in a gown of white organdie and organdie tulle veil, while her shower bouquet was of white roses. Miss Winifred Bell attended as bridesmaid and Mr. F. Beuchel of Dubuque, Ia., served the groom as best man. Little Lucille Morgon acted as flower girl. “Following the ceremony the young couple left for Minnesota. The only out of town guests in attendance at the wedding were the Misses Hattie Hill of Cambridge, Ia., Flossie Scott of Murray, Ia., and Mr. F. Beuchel of Dubuque, Ia. “Miss Banker is a graduate of the Capital City Commercial college and was formerly employed in the circulation department of the Register and Tribune. She has just returned from Beach, N.D., where she has been teaching in the federal vocational high school. Mr. Trepp was formerly commanding officer of Company 45, 163 Depot Brigade, at Camp dodge. He is now with the Kotchain Mercantile company at Wimbledon, N.D., where he and his b ride will be at home after July 1.”


July 9th, 1920

Sentinel Butte News

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Murphy left for Bismarck last Sunday, where they attended the funeral of Mrs. Murphy’s brother who was instantly killed by lightning.


July 9th, 1920

Golva News

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Lorenze are the proud parents of a 9 pound little daughter, who arrived July 1st. All are doing fine. “Rich” is passing the cigars and is a very proud papa indeed.


July 9th, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Johnston entertained a few friends and relatives at their home Saturday evening, it being the 25th wedding anniversary. Delicious ice cream was served to all. Those present were, Mr. and Mrs. D. R. Hennebery and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Walter McNeal and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Anthony and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Jenstun, Howard Egan and Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Sifert, Ed. Sifert, Wayne, Josie, Irene, Lenore and Beth Sifert. All unite in wishing Mr. and Mrs. Johnson many happy returns of the day.


July 9th, 1920

Ollie News

P. O. Esmay returned home from …lley, Neb., on Thursday where … had gone to attend the funeral of … mother. Mrs. F. O. Gift and …her and I. N. Esmay are expected back some time next week.


July 9th, 1920

Thelan News

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Purvis was buried Tuesday morning at 10 o’clock.


July 9th, 1920

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Purvis was laid at rest last Tuesday and the sympathy of the community is extended to the bereaved parents.


July 16th, 1920

Golva News

Frank Schrom and family and Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Finneman, returned from Albion, Minn., where they had been for the past month with their mother, who passed away June 28, and was buried the 30th. We extend our sympathy to the bereaved family.

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Kirkpatrick returned from their visit to Canada, July 4th. They started in their car but had to abandon it at Miles City, on account of the heavy rains, which made the roads impassable. They report a good time and crops looking fine.

Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Ray Stout, a fine baby boy, Friday, July 9th. Mother and baby are doing fine.


July 16th, 1920

Mrs. S. R. Morris received a message notifying her of the sudden death of her uncle, Mr. H. G. Best, last Friday, in Los Angeles. He was a native of New York state, a veteran of the civil war and had made his home the past few years with his sister, Mrs. Morris’ mother, in Los Angeles.


July 16th, 1920

Former Teacher Married

Miss Beulah E. Dempsey, a former teacher of Golden Valley county, and niece of Mrs. A. M. Stoddard, was married July 2, at Winona, Minn., to Vern H. Ferries, a progressive young farmer of Wilton, Wis. They were married by Rev. Parish, pastor of the Winona M. E. church. Her many friends in and around Beach join in wishing them unlimited happiness and prosperity. They will reside on the groom’s farm at Wilton.


July 16th, 1920

Ollie News

…… E. Campbell and sons were …esday dinner and supper guests …. E. C. Osgood home, the occasion …ing Ozzie’s birthday.


July 16th, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. William Burns of Sentinel Butte, announce the arrival on the 12th of an eight pound baby boy, and William is feeling like a ten-time winner.


July 23rd, 1920

Golva News

A bright young barber arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Wendel Phillips, July 18, and Wendell is kept busy passing around the cigars.


July 23rd, 1920

Ollie News

Friends will be pleased to learn of the marriage of Miss Gena Sherva to Mr. Oscar Olson, which occurred at Sidney, Tuesday, July 13th. The groom is a prosperous rancher living near Nohly, Mont., where the couple will make their future home. The community extends congratulations to the newlyweds.


July 23rd, 1920

William O’Connor and family were up from Carlyle, Sunday, and while here had their baby baptized.


July 23rd, 1920

The L. J. Alguire home was graced Tuesday by the arrival of a fine baby girl, and all the folks are doing fine.


July 30th, 1920

Golva News

A bright baby boy arrived at the home of O. Douglas while Mr. Douglas was in the hospital at Miles City. Mrs. Mary Doubles is caring for the mother and baby and both are getting alone fine.


July 30th, 1920

Ollie News

June Billington received the sad news of his (sic) mother’s death at Stanhope, Iowa, the first of the week, and left immediately for that place.


August 6th, 1920

Nick Volck Ends Life With Knife
Crawls Under Lloyd Elevator and Nearly Severs Head With Huge Knife
Has Long Been Despondent and Had Threatened His Own Life Frequently

With his throat cut from ear to ear Nick Volck, assistant cook for the telegraph line crew of the Northern Pacific Railway company, was found dead at 8:30 yesterday morning under the Lloyd elevator in this city. A fourteen-inch butcher knife at his side showed plainly that it was suicide. Mrs. Volck is the cook for the telegraph crew, and her husband was her helper, both having joined the crew but three days ago. “For a long time back, ever since we were married 12 years ago, “ said Mrs. Volck to The Advance, “my husband has been extremely nervous, and this has grown upon him until he has frequently threatened suicide because we could not get along very will in a financial way and it seemed to worry him that I had to work so hard, while he was unable to do much work. “He was very nervous and uneasy last night when we went to bed, but, being very tired, I fell asleep and never awoke until the usual time to get up. My husband fussed around helping me get the breakfast on the table for the men and then went out. When he did not show up by 9 o’clock, and remembering that he had said on Wednesday that he wished he could drown himself, I became uneasy and went in search of him, finally looking under the elevator which is quite high above the ground. There I found him, asleep, as I supposed, until I tried to waken him, and then saw what he had done. I can account for the deed in no other way except that he had been gradually losing his mind and was crazy when he did it.” The body was removed to the morgue and an inquest held at which a verdict of suicide was brought in. The Volcks are from Chicago, to which place the body will be taken by Mrs. Volck, who will be helped in this by the railroad company and friends as she was left without funds. Mr. Volck was 39 years old and had no children.


August 6th, 1920

Golva News Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Fisher of Golva, are rejoicing over the arrival of a lovely little daughter, which came to gladden their home early Sunday morning.


August 6th, 1920

Ollie News June Billington returned home last Tuesday from Stanhope, Iowa, where he had been to attend the funeral of his (sic) mother.

Mr. and Mrs. Murdock Cameron are rejoicing over the arrival of a nine pound boy, born Wednesday, July 28th.


August 6th, 1920

Humps From Camel’s Hump

Last Sunday Tony Lardy had a birthday and neighbors took note of the event and went over to his place in the afternoon with autos loaded to the guards with good thing to eat, and things like that. So we gave Tony and his family a surprise and in doing it had a corking good time ourselves. The following composed the surprise party: Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Boisen and children; Will Zinsli and Otto Boisen of Sentinel Butte; Roy Zinsli of Medora; Mr. and Mrs. Mat Decker and children, Mr. and Mrs. Mike Shever and children, Mr. and Mrs. Matt Sherver and children, Mr. and Mrs. Bob Bublitz and children, and Mr. and Mrs. C. Williams and children.


August 6th, 1920

The John Honnold home was made might glad by the arrival last Saturday of a handsome baby girl and there is great joy thereat.


August 6th, 1920

Bonnie View Notes

Thursday Mr. Stedman received a telegram stating his sister had passed away at Ontario, Wisconsin, to which place he immediately started to be present at the last sad rites.


August 6th, 1920

Clyde Livermore and wife are the proud parents of a fine baby girl the stork brought to their home July 15.


August 6th, 1920

The home of Nick Bartholme at Dickinson was graced a week ago last Sunday with a lovely girl, all who know Nick must admit would be the case. The handsome gentleman alluded to is slowing coming down to earth, and putting in somewhere near regular hours at the Westby store, which he is manager. Mrs. Bartholme and the baby are doing finely.


August 13th, 1920

Ollie

Friends of Miss Bernice A. Beach will be pleased and interested to learn of her marriage on Thursday, July 22, to Edward A. Strong, at Jamestown, N.D. The happy couple will make their home at Aurora, S.D. The many friends of Miss Bernice extend a hearty welcome to Mr. and Mrs. Strong and wish for them all the happiness that can possibly be crowded into a long wedded life.


August 13th, 1920

Sentinel Butte News

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Burns are the proud parents of a cooing baby boy. He is already known as Bill Junior.


August 13th, 1920

There is a report about town that Mr. Strand, teacher of manual training in the high school, and Miss Marie Gronvold, also a teacher in that school, have been married at Leeds, but in the absence of official announcement the report is given for what it is worth, in view of the fact there were indications before the young folks left for the vacations that such an event was but a matter of time.


August 13th, 1920

Little Miss Caroline Rockwell is entertaining her friends with a birthday party this afternoon, and the young folks are have a fine time.


August 13th, 1920

“Bill” Springs Surprise

“Bill” Reynolds sprung a surprise on his many friends Thursday when a box of cigars was set out at Goodwin’s pool hall labeled “Smoke of Old Bill. Married this afternoon, and things like that.” The boys smoked. The romance attached to this little incident runs this way: Thursday afternoon William Reynolds and Mrs. Dora Burton motored over to Wibaux, the modern Gretna Green, and were quietly married by a justice of the peace after which they quietly returned to Beach and the box of cigars soon blazed “Bill” happiness to the world. Mr. Reynolds is well and popularly known in Beach and the county, and the bride has many friends who extend congratulations and good wishes to the newly weds.


August 20th, 1920

Golva News

Mrs. Ralph Jacobs entertained a bunch of girl friends of Miss Isabel McPhee, Tuesday evening, it being her fifteenth birthday. It was greatly enjoyed by those present.

Frank Schrom received a message from New Albion, Minn, Sunday, stating that his youngest sister was dying. He left for that place Monday morning. Mr. Schrom has the sympathy of his many friends here, as it has been only a few weeks since he buried his mother.


August 20th, 1920

Married At Glendive

Cupid scored another victory when Dan Cassidy and Miss Daisy Logan, daughter of E. D. Logan, stole a march on their friends and were married at Glendive, Wednesday, by Rev. Oldsfield of the Congregational church. Miss Logan had been at Dillion visiting Mrs. W. E. Stinson, her sister, and left there to meet the young man at Glendive, while Dan quietly went from here. The young couple will soon be at home in the VanIderstine house. Both are well and favorably known in the city and all their friends will wish them every joy on life’s highway.


August 20th, 1920

Sentinel Butte News

Charles Walters from south of town, was called to Colton, S.D., on account of the sudden death of his father. He returned Tuesday.


August 27th, 1920

Ollie News

A baby girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Rost August 10th.

Mrs. E. C. Osgood received an announcement of the birth of a son to Mr. and Mrs. C. W. McNulty, of Geyser, Mont., on August 11th. The McNulty family will be remembered as former residents of this city.


August 27th, 1920

Golva News

Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Anthony are the proud parents of a baby girl born last Thursday. (Transcribers Note: see article two below, there seems to be some discrepancy when the child was born)


August 27th, 1920

A new baby is rejoicing the home of Ernest Feldman.


August 27th, 1920

The home of Charles Anthony four miles east of Golva was made glad by the arrival of a fine baby daughter last Friday. (Transcribers Note: see article two above, there seems to be some discrepancy when the child was born)


August 27th, 1920

Fred and Mrs. Kannenberg, who live eight miles northeast of town, are very happy over the birth of a strapping baby boy last Saturday.


September 3rd, 1920

Married

Cards have been received announcing the marriage at Minneapolis, June 28, last, of E. W. Clark of Minneapolis, and Miss Ellen Lovgren of Beach. The marriage is quite a surprise to the friends of the bride here, but all will wish her happiness, even though they were kept out of the secret for a couple of months. The groom is a popular traveling man, who expect to be on the road for another year and then go into the home office, when the young couple will take up life at Minneapolis. During that year Mrs. Clark will engage in teaching.


September 10th, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Cook are the proud parents over the arrival of a baby girl, born Saturday, August 28th.


September 10th, 1920

Ollie News

Mr. and Mrs. Claud Baker are the happy parents over the arrival of a baby girl, born Wednesday, August 25.

Friends will be pleased and interested to learn of the arrival of a baby girl at the home of Mr. and Mrs. John Adams of New Castle, Wyo., last week. The Adams family were former residents of this city.


September 10th, 1920

Sentinel Butte News

A five pound baby boy called at the home of Mrs. J. C. Westergaard Wednesday evening and demanded a place to stay. He was a very welcome caller and Mr. Westergaard is wearing the broad smile.

Mr. and Mrs. F. Cannonberg, who live north of Sentinel Butte, are the proud parents of a baby boy, born on Wednesday of last week. Mr. Cannonberg is passing the cigars, it is rumored.


September 17th, 1920

Dr. R. W. Stough Dies Suddenly At Bismarck
Beloved Doctor and Citizen Succumbs to Paralysis and Blood Poisoning

The community was shocked last Sunday morning when news came from Bismarck that Dr. R. W. Stough of this city had passed away at a hospital there that morning, for while many knew that he had gone to get expert treatment, few realized the seriousness of his complaint and none expected a fatality. The cause of death was paralysis. This was brought about through a bruise to Dr. Stough’s nose received when he struck something in diving while bathing at Yellowstone Park, in a stream there some three of four weeks ago. This bruise would not respond to local treatment and blood poisoning set in, communicating with the base of the brain and causing paralysis of almost the entire body. The news of his death had followed word that he was improving and could move parts of his body, so the hopeful friends were all the more shocked when the dread telegram telling of his death arrived. His family went at once to Bismarck and took the body to the doctor’s old home in Ohio, where he was buried amidst the scenes of his boyhood. Dr. Stough graduated at the University of Illinois in 1905 and came to Beach soon after, where he built up a lucrative practice and a host of friends who deeply mourn his untimely taking off. He was a man of great geniality, of signal ability in his professions, and before this ailment appeared to be a man of perfect physical manhood. He leaves a wife and three children to whom the sympathy of the entire county is extended, for few were better or more favorably known than he.


September 17th, 1920

Ollie News

Friends will be pleased to learn of the marriage of Glenn Slater to Miss Gertrude Hansen, of St. Paul, on September 4th. The newlyweds arrived here this week for a couple of weeks’ visit with relatives in Ollie and vicinity before making their home in Minneapolis where Glenn is employed as foreman at one of the garages. The community extends congratulations and best wishes to the bride and groom.


September 17th, 1920

Ed. Hoverson, the popular hardware man, returned from Minnesota, Thursday, where he went to be with his sister, but who, unfortunately passed away just as he got there. He returned Saturday. The many friends of Mr. Hoverson sympathize with him in his loss.


September 17th, 1920

Floyd Bast, the baby boy of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Bast, was buried yesterday morning from the home of his uncle, Oscar Bast, having died Wednesday at a Bismarck hospital after an ailment of some duration. The sympathy of the many friends of the family go out to the stricken parents and relatives.


September 24th, 1920

Sheriff Pierzina Stole A March On His Friends

Cards were received yesterday morning by the many friends of the happy pair announcing the marriage at Dickinson, Wednesday, of Sheriff John Pierzina and Miss Mary Alice Halstead, both of this city. The groom is the popular farmer living north of town, and the bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen P. Halstead, also of Beach, all the parties being well and favorably known and having hosts of friends. While the “boys” suspected the sheriff of some such proceeding, that official kept them in the dark as to the time and place of the marriage, but they will forgive him and wish him and his bride a happy married life and all the joys of prosperity.


September 24th, 1920

County Auditor McCarthy celebrated in a quiet way a birthday Tuesday, but with characteristic modesty declined to give the number, which is probably owing to the fact that a dramatic club has been formed here and there may be a few juvenile parts to play opposite the bevy of handsome young ladies who have joined the club.


September 24th, 1920

An Appreciation

The undersigned wish by this means to express their heartfelt appreciation of the many kindly acts of friends in the death of our boy Floyd, for only those in grief can understand the full value of the solace of kindly administrations at such a time. To those who sent flowers we also express our thanks. Mr. and Mrs. Ben Bast


September 24th, 1920

Mrs. R. W. Stough and family returned from the burial of her husband and father in Ohio, Saturday afternoon.


October 1st, 1920

Margaret Tucker Dies At Bismarck Hospital
Popular Young Woman Passes In Prime Of Life After Brief Illness

Wednesday morning the people of the community were shocked to learn that Margaret Tucker, one of the well known young ladies of the county had passed away during the night at a Bismarck hospital. It had been known that she was critically ill with typhoid fever, but hope had been entertained that she would be spared. The body was taken to Black River Falls and buried by the side of her father, the remains being accompanied by her mother, her step-father, Edward Sommers, brother Floyd Tucker, and Urban Theisen. The funeral will be tomorrow. Margaret Tucker was born at Melrose, Wis., September 10, 1902, and was consequently but 18 years old, and in the prime of young womanhood. She came here 13 years ago with her father and mother, the father dying soon after, and later her mother married Mr. Sommers. She was a member of the graduating class of the local high school last spring and her mental talents and genial disposition gave promise of a life of much usefulness. Of a happy disposition, she made and held many friends, all of whom are grieving over her loss and paying tribute to her many worthy qualities. After her graduation she became employed at Jamestown and was progressing finely when sickness overtook her in a malignant form. Her mother and stepfather hastened to her side and at once had her removed to the hospital at Bismarck, where the best of medical care proved unavailing against the insidious disease, and she passed away at 11:30 p.m. Tuesday, sorrowing relatives being with her to the last. She is survived by her mother, step-
father, one brother, Loyd (sic) Tucker, three half brothers and a half sister.


October 1st, 1920

Golva News

Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Davis were called to Minneapolis, Friday by a wire conveying the sad news of the death of Mr. Davis’ aged mother who has passed away that morning. We extend sympathy to Mr. Davis in his great sorrow.


October 1st, 1920

Sentinel Butte News

Mrs. C. E. Kirkpatrick and son Russell Kirkpatrick, returned Sunday from a summer’s visit with relatives in several Iowa towns and other eastern points.

Mr. and Mrs. Ira Tisor have welcomed baby Leo Tisor into their home born on the 8th of September and weighing eight and one-half pounds. Mother and child are doing nicely.


October 1st, 1920

Ollie News

……..odore Roope left Sunday for ….., to attend the funeral of ……Martin Jacobson, of Carlyle. …….of appendicitis at the Miles …….al. The community extends ….. to the bereaved family.

… O. Brady family are rejoicing …. arrival of another son, born …. September 25th. They have …. little fellow “Frank.” Moth ….. doing nicely.


October 1st, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. Nick Weinacht are very happy over the arrived at their home of a fine baby girl, Monday, the 29th.


October 1st, 1920

A fine boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Reed last Thursday and there is great rejoicing the event in the household.


October 8th, 1920

Golva News

A little daughter arrived to gladden the home of Mr. and Mrs. Mat Zimmer last Friday. Mother and babe are both getting along nicely.


October 8th, 1920

Ollie News

Mrs. Theodore Roppe returned home Tuesday from Hitterdahl, Minn., where she attended the funeral of her brother, Jacob Martinson who died at the Miles City hospital of appendicitis.


October 8th, 1920

Sentinel Butte News

Holmes Boy Meets Death While Riding Faithful Horse

Roland Holmes met his death while riding after the cattle Friday night, September 24th, about 7 p.m. He was thrown from his horse and was unconscious from the time of the accident until his death, two days later. He was alone, only the dog as a companion, and when he did not return home as usual, search was made and the searchers first found his dog, who was guarding over the unconscious boy, who had been lying there three hours. He was immediately taken home and Dr. Jameson summoned, who pronounced concussion of the brain as the ailment and stated there was little or no hope. The boy never regained consciousness and passed away at 12:24 noon, Sunday, September 26th. Roland Holmes was born at Suring, Wisconsin, November 17, 1906, and came to this county with his folks, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Holmes, when he was still an infant. He died at 12:24 p.m. Sunday, September 26th, at his home north of Sentinel Butte, and was buried Tuesday September 23, 1920. The Norwegian Lutheran minister of Beach officiated with a short ceremony at the church and at the Congregational cemetery, where the body was laid to rest. He leaves his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Holmes, two sisters, Mildred and Myrtle, who are in Hoquiam, Wash., three brothers, Chester and Richard in Washington, and Robert of Sentinel Butte. Also grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Gruley of Sentinel Butte. Although the lad was but 13 years of age he had many friends, both old and young, who grieve his death and extend sympathy to those bereaved.


October 8th, 1920

Miss Helen Maxson entertained Misses Jessie Josewski, Grace Stoddard and Ruby Miller and Messrs. Lyle Josewski, Floyd Henderson (sic) and Robert Maxson at a 6 o’clock dinner Wednesday evening, in honor of her eighteen birthday. After the dinner the evening was spent in music and a general good time. Miss Maxson received many novel, but useful gifts and at nine the party broke, all having had a splendid time and pronouncing Miss Maxson the queen of hostesses.


October 8th, 1920

Mrs. A. H. Coburn of Big River, Sask., Canada, is the proud mother of Baby May Elizabeth, born October 2nd. Mrs. Coburn is here visiting her sister for the past three weeks, Miss Florence Cravath. The news was immediately wired to Mr. Coburn, who is still in Canada, and no doubt the boys are receiving the treats up there and it don’t necessarily have to be cigars in Canada.


October 8th, 1920

A restraining order had to be got out last Monday to prevent Mike Bartley from giving the whole store away, the cause of the commotion being the arrival of a handsome baby girl at his home that morning. All are now doing well - even Mike.


October 8th, 1920

Word comes from Portland that Henry Boardman, a son of Mrs. May Rollins, both former residents of Beach, had died last week of tubercular meningitis. The many friends of the family regret to learn this sad news and sympathize with the mother and wife in their loss.


October 8th, 1920

Pearl Cranley Married

The following clipping from a Washington paper will probably prove of interest to old timers who knew Miss Cranley when she taught school here. “Announcement has been made by Mrs. M. Cranley, 619 North Fifth street, of the marriage of her daughter, Pearl Cathran (sic), to Peter Schmidt of Wenatchee, Washington. The marriage took place in the Cathedral of Our Lady of Lourdes, Wednesday morning, September 15, and Rev. Father Verhagen performed the ceremony. “Mr. and Mrs. Schmidt have many friends throughout the state who will be interested in hearing of their marriage. Mrs. Schmidt is a graduate of the music and art department of the University of North Dakota and taught in the Grand Forks schools for one year. Mr. Schmidt is also a university graduate and a member of the Delta Sigma fraternity. “Mr. and Mrs. Schmidt will be at home to friends in Wenatchee, after October 1. “Mrs. Schmidt is a sister of Mrs. Pat Lee of this city.


October 15th, 1920

Master Clayton Francis Campbell celebrated his sixth birthday Tuesday afternoon by inviting the following children in to spend the afternoon: Phyllia Kees, Amy and Eunice Sherva, Elmer Rost, Vernon West, Richard Esmay, Stanley Brady and Donald Solum. The guests departed after a dainty two-
course luncheon was served, wishing Clayton many more happy birthdays.


October 15th, 1920

The Leo McLaughlin home was blessed by a baby girl early Sunday morning and “Mac” is telling the whole country side about the wonderful event.


October 15th, 1920

Clifford Bartholomew was in town yesterday telling the telephone poles about the fine baby girl that came to his home yesterday morning. Wait Clifford, until you have had fifteen or twenty of those blessings, and then you will be urging the doctor to keep it quiet. But this being the first baby of the family it is no use to talk caution. All are doing nicely.


October 22nd, 1920

Golva News

Mrs. Clark Reed of Nobleford, Alberta, Canada, is a guest of her parents Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Kirkpatrick.


October 22nd, 1920

Ollie News

Mrs. Ed. Wee received the sad news Sunday of the death of her father at Fargo. Mr. and Mrs. Wee and daughter, Lyle, left Monday morning for that place.


October 29th, 1920

Austin Slocum Is Dead

Austin Slocum, Sr., an old resident of the county died at a hospital at Dickinson, Thursday of last week after an operation for inflammation of the bowels. He was born at Peewaukee, Wis., April 20, 1858, and later removed with his parents to Neilsville, Wis., where he grew to manhood. On July 26, 1884 he married Frederica Lichte and lived at Neilsville until eight years ago, when he came to Beach. His wife died eleven years ago. He has 12 children: Asa, of Monango, N.D.; Ernie, of Julesburg, Colo.; Elgie, of Glenrock, Wyo.; Lettie, Caddie, Orlin, Herlin and Mrs. George West of Neilsville; Lydia, Charles, Austin, Jr., and George of Beach, and he has one brother, Otis Slocomb, of Neilsville, Wis. The body was taken to Neilsville, Friday by his son Elgie, to be buried by the side of his wife. The funeral was held Sunday. He was highly respected by all who knew him here and his untimely taking off has caused much genuine sorrow in this community.


October 29th, 1920

Death Claims Two Fallon County Citizens

Word has been received of the death of Mrs. R. E. Sutton, wife of Commissioner Sutton, at the home of her parents at Anoka, Minn. Mrs. Sutton had been in ill health all summer and spent some of the time in an institution. Later her condition was considered improving and it comes as a shock to hear of her demise. She leaves two little children with her husband and a host of friends to mourn her loss. The particulars will be given next week. The community was shocked to learn of the death of F. A. Edmondson on Wednesday of this week at the Baker hospital, death being due to pneumonia. An account of his death will appear in next week’s issue.


November 5th, 1920

Golva News

Alfred Kirkpatrick of Jamestown, is visiting at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Kirkpatrick, near Golva.

Mrs. T. Kirkpatrick is enjoying a visit from her aged mother, Mrs. Norgolden (sic), of Detroit, Minn. Alva, a brother’s wife from the same place came to spend a few weeks at the Kirkpatrick home.


November 5th, 1920

Obituary

Our community was hit pretty hard Saturday when we lost two of our most esteemed citizens, in the persons of Henry Stager and George Shoen. Mr. Stager died from heart failure and Mr. Shoen was accidently killed in the Rocky Butte Coal Mine. George Shoen came here from South Dakota about a year ago and he and Mrs. Shoen made their home in Golva. Mr. Shoen went to his son’s Ed’s farm to help him for a few days and went to the Rocky Butte coal mine after a load of coal for his son. Mr. Shoen, Peterson, Frank Randarh (sic) and the Hess boys were loading wagons when Mr. Hess happened to hear a noise. He looked up and saw the hill starting to slide and called to the men to run. Mr. Shoen being lame, could not go very fast and was caught and buried under about fifty tons of earth. Mr. Randush (sic) was also caught in the slide but was not hurt very badly. When Mr. Shoen was dug out he was dead, the back of his head having been crushed by a falling rock. He was 51 years old at the time of his death and was killed on his thirty-third wedding anniversary. He leaves an aged wife and three sons to mourn the loss of a kind father and loving husband. His sons are Edward and Regenold of Golva, and Earl of Aberdeen, S.D. His remains were shipped to Aberdeen for interment Monday. Although among us but a short time he had gained the love and esteem of a host of neighbors and friends who will miss his kindly smile and we all join in extending our deepest sympathy to the bereaved family. Henry Stager was a bachelor, about sixty years old and came to the Golden Valley about sixteen years ago, taking a homestead near Five Points, where he made his home until the time of his death. Friday evening he motored to Beach to hear Mr. Langer speak and on his way home his car broke down and he had to leave it. Saturday morning he hitched up a team and started after his car, taking Ralph Hannifen with him. When they were about half a mile from home Mr. Stager dropped the lines, he having been driving, and fell over against Ralph. As soon as Ralph could quiet the horses which had started to run, he raised Mr. Stager’s head and found he was dead. Mr. Stager is survived by two brothers and two sisters. He brothers are, William, of Golva, and Martin, who used to live here but now is living in South Dakota. Both of his sisters are residents of Iowa. One of his sisters and her husband came to attend his funeral. He was laid to rest Tuesday in St. Mary’s cemetery at Burkey.


November 5th, 1920

Henry Stager Dies Suddenly On Farm
Stricken With Heart Failure While Driving Team in Lone Tree Township

While working on his farm at Five Points, in Lone Tree Township, Friday morning, Henry Stager, 55 years old, died of heart failure and the funeral was held at the farm Tuesday, a large concourse of friends attending. It appears from what can be learned of the sad event, that Mr. Stager was driving from one part of the farm to another with his man, when he suddenly fell over and had to be supported by the man to keep him from falling out of the wagon, while the vehicle was driven to the farm house, where it was found he was dead. Mr. Stager was born in Iowa and moved to this county some years ago. He was a bachelor, and leaves a brother, William, a near neighbor, and a sister who lives at Driscoll, N.D. (sic), who came up to the funeral. He was well and favorably known in his neighborhood.


November 5th, 1920

George M. Shoen Is Killen In Coal Mine
Other Men Have Narrow Escape
Shoen Caught In Big Cave-In

The Ike Corilan coal mine in the south central part of the county was the scene of a fatality Friday afternoon when George M. Shoen met his death from a cave-in. It appears a number of farmers were getting out coal when the cave-in occurred, but all escaped save Mr. Shoen, who was caught by a large slide of coal and earth, and died before he could be rescued by the other men who worked with desperation to dig him out in time to save his life. Mr. Shoen was 58 years old and resided in the neighborhood where he has farmed for a number of years. He leaves a wife and four grown children to mourn his untimely taking off. He was highly esteemed by all who knew him. He was born in New York state and came to this county some years ago and engaged in farming. He was a member of the Old Fellows, Workmen and Woodmen, and the funeral will be held under the auspices of the Odd Fellows at Dell Rapids, S.D., to which place the body was taken Monday.


November 5th, 1920

Ollie News

R. E. Sutton returned this week from Anoka, Minn., where he was called by the illness and death of Mrs. Sutton.

Mr. and Mrs. Parker Greiner are the proud and happy parents over the arrival of a 9 ½ pound baby girl, who arrived at their home of Friday, October 29th. Mother and daughter doing nicely.


November 5th, 1920

Fred Drew Shoots Himself Through Heart With Gun

The community was shocked Tuesday morning when it was learned that Fred Drews, 40 years old, and a prosperous farmer living eight and a half miles southwest of Beach, had committed suicide by shooting himself through the heart early that day, with a sawed off shotgun. According to Mrs. Drews, her husband got up complaining that he had not slept well because of stomach pains with which he had been troubled for some time past, and would not eat any breakfast. He then went out to the cow barn and shortly afterwards Mrs. Drews heard the explosion of a gun and went to the barn to see about it only to find her husband dead upon a pile of straw in the cow barn with the gun beside him. Dr. Maercklain was summoned, but it was plain death must have been instantaneous, as there was a gaping hole through his side just over the heart. One of the singular things about the suicide is that Mr. Drews must have contemplated this means of death for a least a week, for about that time ago he brought home some hack saws, and these, together with a saw blade holder, were found, with the sawed off barrels of the gun in a wagon near the barn. The shotgun had no stock, so what was left of it made it easy to handle for the purpose evidently intended. Mr. Drews has resided on his farm for a number of years and was counted as a very prosperous farmer in every way, out of debt and very happy in his domestic relations, therefore no one can conceive what prompted his insane deed. Mrs. Drews has not been well for some time and only last week returned to her home from the hospital, and this blow has prostrated her, but fortunately there were others at the farm to aid her in the dire tragedy at the time it occurred. The deceased was well known in Beach and was a man who made and held many friends. Of a genial disposition and devoted to his wife, it would have seemed, was not a life as would have prompted such a sad ending, and a number of friends are convinced, from some peculiar actions of his recently, that his mind must have been affected. Mr. Drews leaves a wife and one sister, Mrs. Buidhaupt, to whom the sympathy of a wide circle of friends is extended.


November 12th, 1920

Golva News

Charles Kirkpatrick of Moblesford (sic), Canada, is spending a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Kirkpatrick, near Golva.

Mrs. George Shoen and son Rex returned from Albert Lee, Minn., where they went to attend the funeral of Mr. Shoen.


November 12th, 1920

Ollie News

Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Wee and daughter, Lyla, returned home from Fargo last week Friday, where they had been to attend the funeral of Mrs. Wee’s father.


November 12th, 1920

Madge Honnold Formerly of Carlyle Married

One of the weddings of recent date and one that will prove of local interest, was that of Miss Madge Honnold, who became the bride of Mr. Harry Raymond Hinkley of Portland, Ore., on Monday, October 11th. Mrs. Honnold will be remembered as a former resident of Carlyle, Mont. The groom is a resident of Portland, Ore., and is auditor for a prominent firm of accountants of that city. During the war Mr. Hinkley was with the Canadian forces in France until 1918, when he returned to the states. He recently returned from a cruise to San Salvador on the Destroyer Talbot of the U.S. Navy, in which he is now held in reserve. The bride was gowned in ivory taffeta, and carried a large bouquet of bride’s roses. Her veil was held in place by orange blossoms and her one ornament was pearls, wedding gift of the groom. She was attended by Mrs. Guy Bloomquist as matron of honor and Miss Esther Hersch acted as bridesmaid. Mr. Guy Bloomquist attended the groom as best man. Bridesmaid and matron of honor were gowned in pastel shades of Georgette crepe and both carried pale pink carnations. The ceremony took place at the home of the bride’s mother, Mrs. Laura Honnold, who was assisted by her sister, Mrs. J. L. Johnson, of Grant’s Pass, Oregon. The former was attired in rose colored taffeta and the latter in gray satin. Both wore corsage bouquets of rose barvardia. The ring ceremony was used, Rev. Ira Hawley, formerly of Beach, N.D. officiating. About thirty chosen friends of the bride and her mother witnessed the ceremony. Mr. and Mrs. Hinkley will continue their residence in Portland, Ore.


November 12th, 1920

The world looks brighter to Mr. and Mrs. Julius Zabreski since Wednesday morning when a fine baby girl arrived at their home over near St. Phillips.


November 19th, 1920

Mrs. G. V. Purvis Died Aged 70 Years

Mrs. G. S. Purvis died November 7th, at the home of her daughter-in-law, Mrs. C. W. Purvis, and was buried in the Beach cemetery Tuesday, November 9, a large concourse of friends attending the funeral. Mrs. Purvis was born March 30, 1850, in Morgan county, Near Martinsville, Ind. There she grew to womanhood and was united in marriage to Gideon S. Purvis, March 11, 1871. To this union was born eight children. Four are deceased: Casey William, aged 8 and one-half months; Edward Allen, 21 years; Grace Ethel, two years and four months; and Charles Walter, 44 years. They lived in several states before coming to Montana, where they settled on a homestead and lived there until their health failed, when they came to Beach with their son Casles (sic) and wife at Beach, three years ago last June. From that time she has been in very poor health and finally was confined to bed with the last and severe sickness August 30th. As she was a true christian character, her memory will be dear to the hearts of her many friends and loved ones. The funeral services were held at the Purvis home at 1 o’clock and at the M. E. Church at 2:30 p.m., Rev. VanHorn officiating the services. Those left to mourn are: Araminta Vanderhoof of Glendive, Mont., Dolly M. Eddy of Sentinel Butte, James P. of Everett, Wash., Harry E. of Glendive, the husband, one sister, 14 grandchildren and 15 great grandchildren and a host of friends


November 19th, 1920

Ollie News

Mrs. George West received the sad news of the death of her father Saturday afternoon and left immediately for Haker, where she took the train to Aberdeen, S.D., where interment was made.


November 19th, 1920

Golva News

A bright baby girl arrived at the Thomas Kirkpatrick home Sunday, born to Mrs. Clark Reed of Nobelsford, Canada, who is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. T. Kirkpatrick.


November 19th, 1920

William Whitacre

William Whitace (sic), son of Levi and Margarette Stump Whitacre, was born near the Stump’s school house in Montgomery, Indiana, April the first 1949 (sic). Here he grew to manhood and was united in marriage to Florence Carlock, and to this union three children were born. His first wife passed away more than 42 years ago, and wo (sic) after his death he was united in marriage to Elizt Hutts. After his second marriage he lived for a number of years in the vicinity of Wallace, Hillsboro and Wawnetown (sic), and 4 (sic) years ago moved to Beach, North Dakota, where he was residing at the time of his death. Two weeks ago he was taken ill at his home, and was removed from there to a hospital in Dickinson, where he grew gradually worse until the early morning hours of Sunday, October 17, he passed quietly and peacefully away, at the age of 72 years, six months and sixteen days. He was buried at the old home in Indiana. He left to mourn, his wife, three daughters: Mrs. Charles Williams of Hillsboro; Mrs. Ada Philpott, of the state of Washington; Mrs. Dora Garmo, of Beach; seven sons: William, of Crawfordsville; Robert, who resides in Canada; Bert, of North Dakota; Howard, of Yountsville; Jesse, of North Dakota; Freeman of the state of Washington; Guy, of North Dakota; two step daughters: Mrs. Governor Brewer, of Kent City, Mich.; Mrs. Chancy Delp, of Hoopeston, Ill.; two brothers: Robert, of Yountsville, and Henry of Veederburg; one sister, Mrs. Al. Krout, of Alamo; thirty-one grandchildren and three great grandchildren, a number of other relatives and a host of friends. He was a member of the Christian Union church of near Waynetown, Ind., but during his residence in Beach he affiliated with the Congregational church. He was truly a christian man, was a devoted husband, a kind father a good neighbor and an upright citizen. In the different communities in which he had lived he always identified himself with the best things in life and wielded a splendid influence upon all with whom he came in contact. His life has not been in vain.


November 19th, 1920

Word has been received in the city by friends that Mrs. N. P. Noben’s brother, William Scow, had been killed in an auto accident at Regent, this state. Mrs. Scow, who is a sister of Mr. Noben, was seriously injured in the same accident. Mr. and Mrs. Noben are now living in Minneapolis.


November 26th, 1920

Golva News

Mr. and Mrs. George Hammond are the proud parents of a baby girl, born Saturday. Mother and baby are doing fine.

Earl Kirkpatrick of Jamestown, is visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thom. Kirkpatrick, and expect to remain until after Thanksgiving.


December 3rd, 1920

Sentinel Butte News

Mrs. J. B. Stoddard entertained at a turkey dinner Wednesday evening in honor of Miss Grace Stoddard’s 16th birthday. The dinner was most delicious and served in an abundance. Miss Stoddard received many useful remembrances which will be keepsakes to remind her of the event. The guests were: Misses Helen Maxon, Jessie Josewski (sic) and Ruby Miller, and Messrs. Lyle JoseswskI, Robert Maxon, Leslie Tull, Arthur Underwood and Lloyd Henderson. After dinner the Victrola was started, also the group gathered around the piano and played and sang. All had a delightful evening.


December 3rd, 1920

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Jack Fuller was made happy on Thanksgiving day by the arrival of a fine baby girl. Mother and baby doing well.


December 3rd, 1920

Fitzpatrick-Miller Wedding

It is hoped that next week George Dilley will be able to take up the work of being the Sentinel Butte correspondent of The Advance. This change is made necessary by the marriage of Miss Ruby Miller to S. F. Fitzpatrick, formerly of Spokane, last Friday, this interesting event taking place at the Catholic parsonage of Father Webber at Glendive. Mr. Fitzpatrick has a clerical position with the Northern Pacific and the happy young couple will probably be located for the winter at Terry, Montana. Miss Miller is one of the popular girls of the Butte, whose friends number all who know her. Mr. Fitzpatrick went west early in the week and his wife expects to follow him presently.


December 3rd, 1920

Charles Bettin has returned from Wisconsin, where he was called by the death of his father.


December 10th, 1920

Golva News

Mrs. Clark Reed and little daughter, who have been visiting at the T. Kirkpatrick home, returned to their home in Noblesford, Monday.


December 10th, 1920

Dan Stockwell is all fussed up by the arrival at his home Tuesday of a fine baby girl. The other members of the family are as pleased as Dan.


December 10th, 1920

Rev. M. W. Smeltzer was the guest of honor last evening when a lot of his friends arrived at his home and gave him a surprise, the occasion being his birthday. Of course there was a fine birthday cake with pins and buttons and things in it for the amusement of those finding them and other things to make the occasion happy in the extreme.


December 17th, 1920

E. E. Mikkelson Highly Esteemed Pioneer Dies
One of the Best Citizens of this County Passes After Well Spent Life
A Man of Sterling Worth, of Many Generous Deeds and Dependence is Mourned

The community was shocked Monday to learn of the death of E. E. Mikkelson at a hospital that morning, from cancer of the stomach, an insidious disease from which he had been suffering for more than two years, but unaware until he went to the hospital, of its deadly nature. Mrs. Mikkelson was at his bedside when the dread messenger came, having been summoned to the hospital about two weeks ago. The remains were taken to Mr. Mikkelson’s old home at Louisburg, Minn., Tuesday and the funeral was probably held yesterday. Mr. Mikkelson was born in LacPuiParle county, Minn., 59 years ago and grew to manhood there. He taught school for a time, then married and came to Dakota territory, 39 years ago, where for some years he drove the stage between Bismarck and the Black Hills, a task that required skill and bravery, for the route was infested with Indians and stage hands had many brushes with the reds during those strenuous years. After the railroad reached the Hills and the stage was withdrawn, Mr. Mikkelson came west and settled as a rancher where Mikkelson post office now is, and during those early years met and became a friend of Theodore Roosevelt, the Marquis deMores and all the old times of these parts. He came to Beach in 1906 and bought the farm home on the edge of the city, where he was since lived. He was a prime mover in the organization of the Golden Valley bank, and in 1909 transferred his interests as an organizer of the First National bank, of which he was a director until the time of his death. For the past two years he has been chief deputy sheriff under Sheriff Pierzina, where he performed his duties with that faithfulness that characterized all his work in life. He also served as a member of the city council, his constituency retaining him in this position for several terms and was still serving them at time of death. Mr. Mikkelson was typical of the old style frontiersman: Not given to much talk, keen in judgment, quick to act, and act with decision as occasion arose, of a kindly heart that strove to hide its generosity and in every way a real man who will be keenly missed and mourned by those who had come to know him in his real self. In every way a good citizen, although one of the most quiet and unobtrusive, his death is a distinct loss to the community, as no citizen was more respected, and now that he is gone his praises are in every mouth. Mr. Mikkelson had no children and few relatives, we understand, he leaving but his widow and one brother who lives, we are informed, in Minnesota. Between the hours of 2 and 3 p.m. today all business was suspended in the city out of respect to the memory of Mr. Mikkelson, that hour being the hour of the funeral in Minnesota. The business men of the city are represented at the funeral by a large floral offering as a mute token of the high esteem in which the departed friend and neighbor was held by his home people.


December 17th, 1920

Popular Young Couple Married At Wibaux

Miss Florence Kirkpatrick and Arlie Hayden were united in Holy Matrimony at Wibaux, Mont., Wednesday of last week. The wedding of this young couple came as a pleasant surprise to their numerous friends. Miss Kirkpatrick is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Kirkpatrick of Sentinel Butte, and is well known in Beach and community, having been previously employed by the Golden Valley Telephone at Golva, Sentinel Butte and Beach. She is a young lady of refined and charming manners. Mr. Hayden is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hayden of Ollie, Mont., and is also well known in Beach. The young couple will make their home at Jamestown, where Mr. Hayden is employed at the state hospital. We take pleasure in extending congratulations and best wishes for a happy matrimonial voyage.


December 17th, 1920

Word was received here of the arrival of an eight pound daughter “Sharlotte Sarabelle,” to Mr. and Mrs. Charley Shepherd, on December 1st, at Nashua, Iowa. The Shepherd family will return to Ollie within several weeks.


December 17th, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Osgood received an announcement of the marriage of Mr. Arthur J. Hogan to Miss Naomi L. Holm, at Sioux Falls, S.D., on November 25th. Mr. Hogan is a brother of Mrs. George LaVoy and Mrs. Clifford Cousin, and during his several visits out here, made many friends who will be pleased to learn of his marriage.


December 17th, 1920

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Rost are rejoicing over the arrival of twin boys, born Tuesday, December 7th, one weighing eight and one-half pounds, and the other seven and three-quarters, but the delighted father took on more than double that weight upon hearing the glad news. Mother and sons are doing nicely.


December 17th, 1920

Arlie Hayden and Florence Kirkpatrick stole a march on their many friends here and slipped over to Wibaux, Thursday and were quietly married. Their friends got wind of it and gave them a regular old fashioned charivari Friday evening at the home of the groom’s sister, Mrs. Mat Egan. Arlie came across with the treats in fine shape and the crowd went away happy and wishing the young couple all the good things in life and that their greatest troubles might be only little ones.


December 17th, 1920

An eight pound baby girl arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Anton Strack, Monday morning.


December 17th, 1920

A Black River Falls, Wis., paper announces the death on December 2, of James Thomas, who is well known to the local Black River Falls colony as a farmer, lumberman and Mississippi river steamboat pilot. He was nearly 87 years old at the time of his death.


December 24th, 1920

Ollie News

Carl Rost and daughter, Christ Charlson and the following families, J. K. Tatley, Ed. Want, Alvin, Oliver and Norman Rost, were dinner guests at the Christ Rost home Sunday, the occasion being Mr. Rost’s 58th birthday.

Hayden-Kirkpatrick Arlie Hayden and Miss Florence Kirkpatrick were quietly married at Wibaux on Wednesday, December 15. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Kirkpatrick of Sentinel Butte, and the groom is the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. M. (sic) M. Hayden. The young couple will make their home at Jamestown, N.D., where Mr. Hayden is employed at the state hospital. The community extends congratulations and wishes them a long and happy life.


December 24th, 1920

Three Members Of High Faculty Are Married
Miss Gronvold and Messers Strand and Stanley Celebrate the Holiday Period

When they left here last Friday to spend the holidays elsewhere, it was understood among their intimates that Selmar Strand, manual training teacher, and Miss Marie Gronvold, first grade teacher in the Lincoln school, were to be married Wednesday of this week at Leeds, the home of the bride to be. It was further understood that on Tuesday of this week D. V. Stanley, the agricultural teacher of the High school, was to lead to the altar a Minneapolis girl, but as yet no confirmatory word of these happy events has reached the city. In view of these things, it is plain the Beach schools must have a matrimonial department as well as other up-to-date features. It is understood the two pair of newlyweds will occupy the Harry Wall house on the north side where the two Benedicts have been practicing at light housekeeping for some time, and were doubtless driven to matrimony by their sad experience.


December 31st, 1920

Golva News

Charles and Earl Kirkpatrick are home visiting their parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. Kirkpatrick. They have just returned from different parts of the west Warren Kirkpatrick came home from Noblesford, Canada to spend the holidays with his parents.


December 31st, 1920

Newlyweds Get Decidedly Cool Reception
D. V. Stanley and Bride Arrive to Find Everything in Their Home Frozen Up

Mr. and Mrs. D. V. Stanley arrived in Beach from their honeymoon Sunday night and got a cold reception, as they found the water pipes and the house frozen up, but with commendable fortitude they made the best of the situation and started in housekeeping with the nonchalance of an old married couple. The wedding of this happy couple took place in St. Paul, Monday, December 20, at the Dayton Presbyterian church, after which they took a short trip that ended at Beach as stated. Mrs. Stanley was Miss Salome Alice Peffley, daughter of W. H. Peffley, prominent in business affairs at Indianapolis, and was one of the popular girls of her home town. Mr. Stanley is the agriculturist at the High School and very popular with the student body of the school, he being the coach and sport master of the various athletic teams. Mr. and Mrs. Stanley will be at home January 1.


December 31st, 1920

Ollie News

Morris-Vincelette

The marriage of Miss Blanche Vincelette, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Vincelette, and Mr. Fred L. Morris, was solemnized Thursday, December 23rd, at Miles City, Mont., Father O’Carrol officiating. The bride is one of the popular and accomplished young women of this community, where she has grown to womanhood, and is admired by all who know her. The groom is engaged as assistant cashier of the Ollie State bank, and has made many friends during his two years here. He is a young man of good habits and highly esteemed by all. Ollie heartily welcomes Mr. and Mrs. Morris to this vicinity and wish them a long a prosperous life.



Copyright 2006 Larry Fitzgerald