BIRTH, MARRIAGES, DEATHS FROM
The Beach Advance
1919



January 3rd, 1919

Former Beach Boys Become Benedicts

Burton - Pierce Nuptials

The many friends of C. E. Pierce will be surprised to learn of his marriage to a popular Minneapolis young lady by the name of Miss Beulah ….belle Burton, Monday, December …, at Billings, Mont. She is said to be a very accomplished young lady, having graduated from the Minnesota university and afterwards teaching in one of the high schools in Minneapolis. Mr. Pierce is well and favorably known among the Beach people, having been in the drug business here for four years as the junior member of the firm of Rice & Pierce. The young people will be at home for their friends after February 1st, at Joliet, Ill., where Mr. Pierce is owner of a drug store.

Bean - Reeve Nuptials

Miss Grace Bean of Glendive and I. J. Reeve were married in Miles City, December 21st. Mr. Reeve has ……….some ……. ady. Reeve came to this part of N. Dakota in 1910 and took up ranching and farming north of Beach. He is well known among the people of Golden Valley county and he and his bride will be most heartily welcomed when they arrive here the first part of the week from a wedding trip to the Twin Cities. It is thought that they will be at home to their many friends in Glendive, after January 6th.


January 3rd, 1919

Tony Brown

The sad death of Tony Brown occurred at his home, 55 miles north of Beach, near the mouth of the little Beaver, Friday, December 27, at 2:30 in the afternoon. The young man was ill for a few days with the Spanish influenza when his wife and little girl were stricken. As they were a mile and a half from the nearest neighbor, and no one knew they were sick, it was up to Mr. Brown to get up and take care of his family. Getting up in such a critical condition caused a relapse, followed by pneumonia, making it a matter of only a couple of days before he died. His remains were buried in the Beach cemetery Saturday afternoon at 4 o’clock, Rev. Thatcher officiating. Tony brown was born in ……, Michigan, in the year of 1891, and lived there, with the exception of two years in Minnesota, until 1903, when he moved west and located at Beach. Here Tony went to the High school for two years and was well liked among those with whom he came into contact. In 1912 he married Miss Bertha Arp. To this union one little girl, now aged three years, came to bless the home. After his marriage he farmed and was very successful for the conditions under which he labored. He leaves besides his wife and little girl, his mother, Mrs. Ida Brown, two brothers, Ben and John, and three sisters, Susie, Delia and Messila. The sympathy of the community is extended to the sorrowing relatives.


January 3rd, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Brastrup are rejoicing over the arrival of a fine eight and a half pound baby boy, born to them Sunday morning, December 29th. Mother and child are doing nicely, but we are afraid that it will take “Dad” Brastrup some time to fully recover.


January 3rd, 1919

Born to Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Starmer, a baby girl last Sunday, December 29th. All are doing nicely.


January 3rd, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Jonas are rejoicing over a little daughter born to them December 30th, at their home three miles north of Beach.


January 3rd, 1919

Golva News - John Shafer left Christmas day for Arcadia, Wisconsin, where he was called by the death of his father.


January 3rd, 1919

Garner and Vicinity - Nervell Corliss and wife are the proud parents of a son, born to them on December 20th.


January 10th, 1919

W. H. Franklyn Died Monday

Carlyle Editor Answers Call of “30.” Stricken With Paralysis He Lived But a Short Time

H. W. Franklyn, of Carlyle, Mont., died of paralysis last Monday, January 6, at 1:00 o’clock. He was born in Lexington, Kentucky, January 12, 1875, and was therefore nearly 44 years of age at time of death. Harry was the only surviving member of his father’s and mother’s family, the others having all preceded him in death. Mr. Franklyn had not been feeling well, but yet was able to do the work in the office, having gotten out last week’s paper on time. He had all but finished the last line on a piece of job work on Saturday and was up and around Sunday. The end came suddenly. The community in which he lived will be the loser as he was making a success of the Herald that had not been experienced before his advent into the newspaper game at Carlyle. Mr. Franklyn was well liked by all who knew him. A good business man, a thorough mechanic and a man that understood the newspaper game. He received his early training on the Chicago Inter-Ocean, of which paper his uncle was manager for a number of years. He was linotype operator for the Golden Valley Progress nearly all summer and in the fall went to Carlyle to take charge of that paper, having bought the larger interest in the plant. We owe much to Mr. Franklyn in this office, as he has given us instruction and help that was of great benefit to us in operating the linotype. He leaves to mourn his demise, a wife and adopted daughter and to them, with the community, we wish to express condolence in their sad hour.


January 10th, 1919

Death of Harley Edgar Wallace

Again this week we are called upon to chronicle the death of one of our popular young men of Beach. Word was received here last week, by Mr. and Mrs. Willis Wallace, of the death of their son Harvey Edgar, October 21st, from wounds received in battle. It is said he died about the same time as a neighbor boy, Harry Anderson, only that in some way the Anderson’s were officially notified a month before the Wallace’s. It seems strange that Mrs. Wallace should be the one to help Mrs. Anderson in her hour of trouble, wondering at the same time about her own boy and yet know knowing. Harvey Edgar Wallace was born in Ontario, Wis., April 27, 1900, and died at the age of 19 years, 4 months and 22 days. Ontario was Harvey’s childhood home. Later he came to Beach, where his father took land north of town and moved his family. Harvey helped his father during the summer months, and when he reached the high school grade, attended the schools in Beach during the winter. On June 12, 1917, he enlisted with Co. K. in Dickinson, and went with that organization to France, December 12, 1917. Upon arrival there he was transferred to the 16th Infantry, Co. D, and almost immediately went to the front, so that he saw a great deal of hard fighting before his death. Letters will be sent to the commanding officer and Red Cross society, to learn what they can of the particulars of his wound, death and burial. Harvey was a clean young man, of good moral and religious ideas. He was a member of the Methodist church and while at Beach attended regularly. He was also active in the Young People’s society and had lived in such a way that he was prepared for death when it came. The loss is indeed great for his parents and four brothers, but perhaps we should feel as does his mother, that he did his duty for his country and we should not mourn his loss, but be thankful we had a son to give to so noble a cause. They sympathy of the entire community is with the Wallace’s in their hour of trouble.


January 10th, 1919

Unofficial Report of Ross Zollinger’s Death In France

It is with deep regret that we publish this week, the statement received in Beach of the death of Ross Zollinger in the service of his country, in the great world war. There are very grave doubts as to the truth of the report for the reason of the most perfect system maintained in the army over seas to report to headquarters every day those killed in action or who died for any reason in the hospitals. These reports then come by cable to Washington, and from there are immediately wired to the nearest living relative. There has been no official notice to the effect that Ross died of his wounds, received by his father, who lives at Ollie, up to this time. Hoping against hope that our doubts are true and that the letter is wrong, we give the news to our readers as it came to us. Portion of a letter received by A. E. Swan, from a lieutenant in France, on which is based the supposition that Ross was killed about November 8th, in the Argonne Forest: “When I saw him he was so seriously hurt that death was imminent, and the nurse said he would not last through the night. * * * * I did not know him, unfortunately, for he was a man anyone would be proud to know, and met his death gallantly because of his conception of duty. Three machine gun bullets found their way through his body, four in his legs and two in his right arm. He was also gassed and suffered concussion from a high explosive. He was in a division which was the keystone which ………the Argonne offensive and emerged scathe less in two months of constant fighting previous, in the biggest, deadliest battle of the way. I am glad to tell you that he is one of the shining lights, whose deeds have won the war. You will notice that death is based on the statement of the nurse some hours before even she thought it would take place. It is not at all impossible that in this case the unexpected happened and that Ross weathered the storm. Then the statement by the lieutenant, “I did not know him,” coupled with the fact that no official notice has been received, adds further hope, for it may have been a case of mistaken identity. Ross Zollinger was well known and had many warm friends in Beach. He was at one time editor and manager of the Beach Advance. He was a writer of more than average ability and contributed articles to some of the leading magazines, the Ladies Home Journal and other high class publications. At the time of his enlistment into the service he had charge of the publicity bureau of Grand Forks as secretary of the commercial club. Ross was popular in society, an entertaining conversationalist, a musician with artistic temperament suited to playing band music, orchestra work or difficult solos on the saxophone. He was also master of other musical instruments. Everyone in this office is acquainted with Ross and every effort possible has been made to get the facts. Further than what is stated above, is a letter to Mr. Hougen from his son Jesse, dated December 13, 1918, which contains the remark: “I saw Lieutenant Sprague and Ross Zollinger a few days ago.” To us “a few days ago” is vague; it may mean yesterday or a longer period of time. However, let us still hope there is some mistake and that Ross will return shortly with the triumphant boys from France.


January 10th, 1919

Popular Young Couple Married Wednesday

Wednesday evening, at the Methodist parsonage, at 7 o’clock, a popular young couple of Beach, Miss Emma Holler and Leo Stockwell, spoke the words which made them man and wife, under the direction of Rev. Thatcher. Only the immediate family witnessed the ceremony. The bride was beautifully gowned in Persian georgette, with gray kid shoes to match the background of the dress, and looked very pretty. The groom was dressed in his military suit, the couple making a striking appearance. Mr. Stockwell came to Beach with his parents fourteen years ago, and is well and favorably known here. He went to school at this place and graduated with the class of 1917. Because of his poetical genius and his numerous productions along this line, he was given the title of class poet. He was also class editor for a time and ably sustained the class record and honor. Almost immediately after his graduation he joined Co. M and left Beach the 1st of October, 1917, as one of its members. He was in the service about six months when he was given an honorable discharge on account of illness. Upon returning home his father determined that his family must have a representative in the service, made application and was accepted. He is now station at Camp Lewis, has won his way to the head of the non-commissioned list and expects soon to go to Russia and help with the work there. Miss E. Holler, formerly of Van Horne, Ia., came here from Drayton, N.D., in the fall of 1917, and was employed by the law firm of Keohane & Jones for several months, when the Bankers Bond & Mortgage Co. induced her to enter their employ. She is a very capable young business woman, a graduate form the Grand Forks Business College at sixteen and possessed with a varied and valuable experience after graduation. Since coming to Beach she has made many friends by her cheerful and kindly disposition. The many friends of the contracting parties extend to them best wishes for a happy and prosperous life. They will be at home to friends after February 15th, at Beach.


January 10th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Crouse of Thelen are the proud parents of a big baby boy, born Saturday, January 4th. Mother and child are doing well.


January 17th, 1919

T. N. Roble went to Carlyle, Saturday to help Mrs. Franklyn get out the Carlyle Herald, after the sudden death of her husband. She has decided to keep the paper going herself if possible.


January 17th, 1919

Bonnie View (Too late for last week) -
Tuesday, December 31st, the word was received by Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Wallace of the death of their son Harley Wallace, which occurred some time in October, from wounds received in battle. Harley was a young man of splendid character and possessing a very pleasing personality. When war was first declared Harley was among the first to answer the call to arms, and he died fighting to uphold the flag of his country. To the sorrowing family is extended the sympathy of their many friends in the neighborhood.


January 17th, 1919

Mrs. A. N. Englund received the sad news of the death of her brother D. E. Dane, of Waubon, Minn. Mr. Kane visited here several times and was a brother of Mrs. Shear and Mrs. Madland, formerly of Sentinel Butte and Jack Kane. Interment was made at Waubon, January 2nd. He leaves a wife and son, besides his sister, brother and father to mourn his loss.


January 24th, 1919

Ralph Kenneth Purvis
Death from the dreaded epidemic, Spanish influenza has taken another Golden Valley country boy, also in the service. The brave young soldier, only twenty years of age, volunteered his services in behalf of his country and outraged humanity, went to Miles City for examination, but was rejected on account of not being of sufficient weight for his height, and consequently not strong enough to withstand the hardships of war. But undaunted by this the young man with the courage born of youth, went to St. Paul, where he passed a satisfactory examination October 23rd, and joined the marines to leave for training camp November 19th. On that date he was called home on account of the serious illness of his mother and contracted the disease while on the journey home, and was not feeling at all well when he returned to St. Paul, but always conscientious in regard to this duties, he was determined to go back to headquarters to report. After returning to the city his condition rapidly grew worse. His father started for St. Paul as soon as he received the telegram, but was unable to see Ralph alive, as the message was not sent in time. The mother, brother and grandfather were all sick at the time of his death and were unable to attend the funeral. Ralph Kenneth Purvis was born June 26th 1898 at St. Cloud, Minn., and came with his parents to the Golden Valley in the spring of 1904, where he resided until called to the service. Died at St. Paul, Minn., December 1, 1918. He was educated in the rural schools and did one year of school work at the Beach High school, then deciding upon a business career he attended business college at LaCrosse, Wis. He worked for some time on The Advance and by his genial and obliging manner made many friends, as he also did in school and with whoever he became acquainted with. He leaves to mourn his loss his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Purvis, one brother, grandparents, aunt and uncle and Mr. and Mrs. Rube Clark of Hodges, Mont., aunt and uncle Mr. and Mrs. Mason Vanderhoof, Belle Prairie, Mont., sister-in-law, Mrs. Charles Purvis Jr., and cousins from Belle Prairie, Mont., Mr. and Mrs. John Harpster. The remains were brought home Tuesday on No. 3, the funeral services being held Thursday at 2 p.m. Interment was made at the Beach cemetery, the ceremony at the grave concluding with military honors. The sympathy of the entire community goes out to the bereaved parents in the loss of their soldier son, who had been away so short a time before being stricken with the epidemic.


January 24th, 1919

Charles W. Purvis

We are called upon to chronicle the death, which took place during the past week, of one of this county’s most prominent citizens, Charles W. Purvis, who passed away on December 8th, 1918, at the age of 45 years and nineteen days. Mr. Purvis was born in the county of Hendrick, State of Indiana, on November 19, 1875. During the year of 1879 his parents moved to St. Cloud, Minnesota, where he grew to manhood. In 1896 he was united in marriage to Miss Effie M. Whitney, this union being blessed with two sons, Charley A. Purvis and Ralph K. Purvis. With his family he came to Golden Valley county in 1904, and has since that time made this his home. Some few days ago he was called to St. Paul by a message stating that his son, Ralph K. Purvis, who had recently enlisted in the United States army, was dangerously ill. Mr. Purvis arrived in St. Paul a few hours after the death of his son, and the belief that he contracted the Spanish influenza, which caused his death while returning with the remains of his son, only adds to the sorrow caused by the passing of this good man. Charley Purvis was widely known throughout this territory. He established an enviable reputation of high character, was every honorable, thoroughly upright and held in highest esteem by his every acquaintance. Always of a jovial and generous disposition, he never lacked in friendships and no friend ever found his wanting. During his life he was successful in providing a pleasant and comfortable home, not only for his immediate family, but for his aged parents, who occupied their home on the same farm. Truly this community suffers a distinct loss in the untimely death of Charley Purvis, and this paper wishes to convey the deep sympathy of many friends to this sad family during their hour of grief.

Note - We republish the obituaries of Charley W. Purvis and his son Ralph because the likeness which was to appear with the write-up in The Advance at the time of death, was unavoidably delayed in coming. The sadness of the double death in the family and the sickness of Mrs. Charley W. Purvis and son Charles Jr., at that time made a marked impression of grief in the community. Mrs. Purvis and Charley Jr. are now well and in a measure have recovered from this sickness. The memory io those who have gone before will always remains.


January 24th, 1919

Charles and Warren Kirkpatrick left Beach, Monday for Seattle, Wash., to accept positions, at least for the winter months.


January 24th, 1919

News was received Sunday evening, by Dave Hawkins, who lives north of Beach, of the death of his father at Forest River, N.D. Mr. Hawkins will not be able to attend the funeral.


January 24th, 1919

Alfred Kirkpatrick returned home from Camp Grant, Thursday, after receiving an honorable discharge. He has been in the service the past five months.


January 24th, 1919

Mrs. T. N. Kirkpatrick is enjoying a visit from her mother, Mrs. Nordgulen, of Minneapolis.


January 24th, 1919

A party of young folks from Ollie, drove out to the Marion Hooper home Friday evening as a surprise party, in honor of Clara’s birthday. Games were played and a delicious lunch was served at midnight, after which everyone returned to their homes, wishing Clara many happy returns of the day. Those present were Ruth Baker, Ethyl Rogers, Howard Stark, Ruth Smith, Bernice Beach, Lillian Esmay, Gertrude Stark, Charles Turner, Bernard West, and Mr. and Mrs. Young and Oral and Gladys Gift.


January 31st, 1919

Due to the funeral of our late sister, Mrs. Wojohn, the meeting of the congregation scheduled for next Sunday must be postponed three weeks.


January 31st, 1919

Influenza Victim

Once more the dreadful plague has stepped up to claim a victim, one of the ……… …… and belo …… hers, Mrs. Herman J. Wojohn ……. es south of town ….. has been ailing with ……. numb and, seeking re …… to the Bismarck hospital to undergo an operation. She returned greatly benefited, also cheered by the prospect of regaining sound health and the normal use of her limb. However, the One above in Him all wise providence, chose to take her out of this world of suffering and pain to restore her to everlasting well being. After her return from the hospital unexpectedly the prevailing epidemic set in and continually going lower she finally gave up her ghost into the hands of her Savior, Wednesday morning at 5:30. Mrs. Herman Wojohn was born February 5, 1883, at Milfort, Brown county, Minn., her parents being Edward Erdman and Mary nee Deuber. She was christened at Sleepy Eye, receiving the name Mathilda Bertha. At Milfort she spent her childhood days, later moving to Rices, Benton county, Minn., and in 1905 to Golden Valley county, where one year later on June 28, she was united in marriage with Herman J. Wojohn. This union was blessed with two children, Elbert and Frederic, who, together with the husband and father, keenly feel the loss and sorrow inflicted by the departure of the mother. Besides these are three brothers and three sisters, who also mourn her death. By her quiet and unassuming, as well as earnest disposition, Mr. Wojohn had won the respect and admiration of all who knew her. Her many friends sorrow over her going and with keen regret extend to Mr. Wojohn and his boys, the hand of sympathy, especially since Mr. Wojohn and children are sick and confined to their home with influenza and will be unable to even attend the funeral. Funeral services will be conducted from the house two miles south of town, Sunday at 1:00 o’clock by Rev. Trinklein.


January 31st, 1919

Death of Magnus Firth

Magnus Firth died this morning at 6 o’clock, of heart failure, at St. Joseph’s hospital, where he was taken yesterday afternoon from his residence at the State Home for Feeble Minded, when he became ill of gastritis. Until yesterday he was in apparently good health, but became considerably ill and it was hoped that treatment at the hospital would restore him. Last night his condition became very serious, ending in death this morning. The deceased was born February 8, 1846, in the province of Quebec, Canada. He came to Chippewa Falls in 1869, settling in the town of Cleveland on a farm. He engaged in logging thirty years ago, …………..several years. In 1894 he was elected to the office of county clerk and moved to this city. He held the office for eight years, displaying unusual ability. He was an official of integrity and capability. He possessed a remarkable memory and was a well educated and studious man. He had a great faculty for working out details in any line in which he was engaged, being accurate and methodical. He was prominent in the Republican party for a dozen years or more. In January, 1903, he entered the abstract office of Connor & Leonard, remaining there four years. In 1910 he went to Boyd as cashier of the State Bank of Boyd for two years and in 1912 took the position of steward for the State Home of Feeble Minded, which he held continuously until his death. He was a Knight Templar in the Masonic lodge. In every way Magnus Firth was a fine man and on the square. He was a tireless worker and never considered taking vacation for rest or pleasure. His death is a distinct loss to this community and comes as a great shock with the many other regrets that have harassed the people by numerous deaths of splendid citizens. Surviving are his bereaved wife, two sons, Major E. A. Firth, with the 32nd division, A.E.F. and who has lately been in the American hospital at Bordeaux, suffering from gas, Earl Firth of Meade, Wash., and one daughter, Mrs. Adam Faris, of this city. Funeral arrangements will be announced later, pending word from the son, Earl Firth at Meade, Wash. The remains have been taken to the home of John Hodgins on E. Grand Avenue, where they will lie in state till the funeral.


January 31st, 1919

Items from last week -
Mrs. C. E. Strahon was called east on account of the serious illness of her brother, who died shortly after her arrival.


January 31st, 1919

Items from last week -
H. L. Babcock received the sad news of the death of his sister and husband from influenza and left for Sioux Falls, S.D., on Thursday.


January 31st, 1919

Death of Mrs. Mabel Knoop

Wednesday, January 29th, at her home near Edgehill, the death of Mrs. Ed Knoop took place. She had been ailing the past few days more than usual in her weakened condition, and death seem to come more as a relief to her sufferings. Mabel Taggart was born in 1888, at Taylor, Wis., and lived there for the first four years of her life, then her people moved to Marrilan. At this place she grew to womanhood, leaving there in 1907 to come west with her parents, who had taken a homestead southwest of Beach. The next spring she met and married Ed Knoop and they at once took up their residence on his farm not far from Edgehill and where he had provided a very comfortable home. Two children came to bless this union, Frances and Vera. Besides her husband and children, she leaves to mourn her loss, a mother, Mrs. J. C. Taggart, of Walla Walla, Wash., a brother Henry, also of that place, and a sister, Mrs. Ethel Johnson, of Emmerglan, Wash. The funeral arrangements have not been made yet, so that friends will have to inquire later. The community sympathizes with the family in their hour of sorrow.


January 31st, 1919

Popular Young Man Brings Home Bride

Last Tuesday as No. 3 came in, a young man who is well known to the Beach people in the business world, stepped off of the train, accompanied by a good looking young lady. Upon inquiry we found that it was Mr. and Mrs. William Odenbaugh. The former had been in the pool hall business here until last July when he enlisted in the service of Uncle Sam and went directly to the east coast. For several months past he has been at Camp Crone, Penn., employed as acting sergeant. He was mustered out of the service on the last day of the old year and went at once to Austin, Minn., where he married Miss Emily Van Alstyne on January 9th. Since that time they have been traveling around visiting with friends and relatives, before coming to Beach, their future home. The young people will be given a warm welcome by the people of this vicinity and all unite in wishing them the larger portion of the joys of life.


January 31st, 1919

Noisy Reception Given

On returning home from the movies last Tuesday evening, Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Rhodes were greeted with an unearthly racket which came from both the inside and outside of the house. Everything capable of making noise was used, and old time charivari, the occasion being Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes’ eleventh anniversary of their wedding. After a very pleasant evening, a dainty lunch was served by the guests. Mr. Rhodes and family have lived in Beach about a year, he being employed as blockman by the J. I. Case Threshing Machine Co.


January 31st, 1919

Golva News Notes -
A large crowd from Golva and vicinity attended the party at Siferts Saturday evening, the occasion being Mr. Sifert’s birthday. Whist was the game of the evening. The lucky ones in winning the prizes were, Jim Gowers, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Egan. Consolation prizes were awarded to E. Egan and Mrs. Kirkpatrick.


January 31st, 1919

Bonnie View Notes -
Last Monday evening at the Neihl home, a large crowd pleasantly surprised Mr. and Mrs. Frank Neihl, the occasion being their fiftieth (sic) anniversary. Games of all kinds furnished the entertainment and a delicious lunch was served. Everyone enjoyed an exceedingly good time and departed for home wishing Mr. and Mrs. Neihl many years of happiness and prosperity. Those present from Bonnie View were Mr. and Mrs. Henry Severson and family and Miss Vivian Nolan. (Transcribers Note: the name in this article was spelled Neihl - see following additional January 31st article)


January 31st, 1919

Golva News Notes (Too late for last week) -
Mr. and Mrs. George Sygulla are the proud parents of a baby boy, born to them last Wednesday.


January 31st, 1919

Arvid News -
A number of the friends of Mr. an Mrs. Frank Nehls gather at their home Monday evening to help them celebrate their fifteenth (sic) wedding anniversary. As the affair was in the nature of a surprise, each guest furnished a portion of the luncheon. Games were played until midnight, when lunch was served, shortly after which the guests departed for their homes, having enjoyed a very pleasant evening. Mr. and Mrs. Nehl were presented with a sum of money as a remembrance of the occasion. (Transcribers Note: the name in this article was spelled Nehls/Nehl - see previous additional January 31st article.)


February 7th, 1919

Nettie Zielsdorf Passed Beyond

Monday word was received of the death of Mrs. Franc Zielsdorf, at Long Beach, Cal. The deceased had been ailing in health for the past two years and last fall went to California in the hope that the climate would improve her condition, she having received much benefit from a sojourn there a year ago. However, this visit did not bring the desired results, probably due the undermining of her recuperative powers, and she continued to gradually fail. Her sisters, Mrs. Matt Smith and Mrs. Ernest Zielsdorf, were notified of her condition and left immediately for California, and were at her bed side at time of death. Nettie Stockwell was born in Black River Falls, Wis., in the year 1879, and lived there during her girlhood days. It was there she met and married Franc Zielsdorf, and after a few years of married life they came to Beach in the spring of 1907, establishing their home at once on their farm northwest of this city. Two children came to bless this union, Miss Lillian, who entered high school as a senior this year, and little Kathryn, who was also attending the Beach schools. Besides her husband and two children, she leaves her parents, Mr. and Mrs. ….. Stockwell, two sisters, Mrs. Matt Smith and Mrs. Ernest Zielsdorf, all of Beach, and five brothers, Emerson Stockwell of Bend, Ore., Sergeant Leonard Stockwell of Camp Lewis, Orin, Dan and Howard Stockwell of Beach. Also an aunt, Mrs. James Baker. The remains were brought to Beach and the funeral services held at the Congregational church on Saturday afternoon and were largely attended. During her residence in the Golden Valley, Mrs. Zielsdorf has won the admiration and respect of her many acquaintances and while her death was not unexpected, yet it was with the deepest sorrow that it was received. To her immediate family especially is sincere sympathy extended in the hour of their sore bereavement.


February 7th, 1919

Mrs. Roy Crone

A telegram was received by W. A. Davis, Wednesday, telling of the death of Mrs. Roy Crone of the Trotters country. She had gone to Colchester, Ill., to visit her mother and although the cause of death is not known, it is supposed she contracted the influenza. Clara Atkinson was born in Colchester, Ill., in 1882, and made her home there the greater portion of her life. She married Roy Crone at that place in 1900 and for the first few years of her married life continued living in her girlhood town. In the year of 1912 they decided to come west and located on a homestead about four miles from what is now Trotters. They have steadily improved their land and were making a success of farming when her death occurred. She leaves a husband and two daughters, one seventeen and the other a baby of three months, in her immediate family, besides a mother, three brothers and one sister. Her remains were laid at rest in Colchester, where she has a baby boy buried. The community extends its sympathy to the family .


February 7th, 1919

Miss Reeve Beach and Charles Edward Joslyn, both of this county, were united in marriage at the M. E. parsonage on Wednesday of this week, the Rev. A. L. Hurlburt officiating. The bride’s parents reside about five miles southeast of town and the groom has a home near St. Phillips. After the ceremony the young couple spent a part of the afternoon visiting with the Rundle family, with whom they are intimately acquainted. The Pioneer extends best wishes for a long and happy life. - Wibaux Pioneer.


February 7th, 1919

Mrs. Edward Erdman and son Mike returned to their home in Rices, Minnesota, Monday. They came to Beach on account of the death of Mrs. Wojohn, who is a daughter of Mrs. Erdman. While here they visited at the home of her son, Albert Erdman.


February 7th, 1919

A marriage license was issued to Rolland Harvey and Eleanore Richards the first of the week and the young man left for Dickinson on the noon train Tuesday.


February 7th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Guy Curl are the proud parents of a baby girl, born Monday.


February 7th, 1919

William Zimmer returned Thursday from Minneapolis, where he attended the funeral of his sister.


February 14th, 1919

Death of Mrs. Mabel Knopp

Wednesday, January 29th, at her home near Edgehill, the death of Mrs. Ed Knoop took place. She had been ailing the past few days more than usual and in her weakened condition death seemed to come more as a relief to her sufferings. Mabel Taggart was born in 1888, at Taylor, Wis., and lived there for the first four years of her life, then her people moved to Merrillan. At this place she grew to womanhood, leaving there in 1907 to come west with her parents, who had taken a homestead southwest of Beach. The next spring she was married to Ed Knoop and they at once took up their residence on his farm not far from Edgehill and where he had provided a very comfortable home. Two children came to bless this union, Frances and Vera, 9 and 6 years old. Besides her husband and children she leaves to mourn her loss a mother, Mrs. J. C. Taggart, of Walla Walla, Wash., a brother Henry of the same place, who came to attend the funeral, and two sisters, Mrs. Ethel Johnson of Timmenglau, Ore., and Mrs. Minnie Martin of Hixton, Wis., and a brother Homer of Medland, S.D. The funeral services were held at the morgue, February 3rd, at 10:30 A.M., Rev. Trinklein officiating. She was laid at rest in the Beach cemetery. The community sympathizes with the family in their hour of sorrow.


February 14th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Guy Curl are the proud parents of a fine baby girl, born to them last week.


February 14th, 1919

Mrs. N. Rogers of Loyal, Wis., accompanied by Miss Eva Barga, arrived in Beach, Wednesday afternoon. The former was called to Wisconsin on account of the illness and death of her mother. Her friend will make a visit of several weeks in our city.


February 21st, 1919

Death of Mrs. Theodore Johnson

The many friends and acquaintances of Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Johnson in Beach and vicinity will be sorry to learn that Mrs. Johnson succumbed to the ravages of the recent epidemic, the influenza, at her home in Emmenglau, Wash., on Tuesday, February 11th. This death, following so quickly that of her sister, Mrs. Ed Knoop, which took place on January 29th, is indeed a heavy bereavement for the surviving relatives. Mrs. Johnson had not fully recovered from an attack of the influenza at the time of her sister’s death, and shortly after suffered a relapse, death following in a few days. Miss Ethel Taggart was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Taggart and was born in Taylor, Wis., about twenty-eight years ago. She came to the Golden Valley in 1907, when her parents took up their residence on the homestead just across the line in Montana. Here she became acquainted with and afterwards married Theodore Johnson, immediately taking up their residence on Mr. Johnson’s farm in the Lame Steer district where they lived for about three years. When her parents moved to Oregon, Mr. and Mrs. Johnson went with them and have since lived in the west. Mrs. Johnson is survived by her husband and four children, her mother, two brothers and one sister, to whom sincere sympathy is extended. Interment was made at Emmenglau.


February 21st, 1919

Golva News Notes -
Mr. and Mrs. Tony Kreitinger are the proud parents of a baby girl, born to them on Sunday, February 9.


February 21st, 1919

Death of Mrs. Josie Crone

Word has been received by W. S. Davis of the death of Mrs. Josie Crone which took place last Friday morning at Colchester, Ill. Deceased went to that place last summer to join her husband and was to have spent the winter there. During the fall, sickness in Colchester was quite prevalent and she helped to nurse various relatives and friends until her worn out condition made her an easy victim for the influenza, which she contracted from her nephew. Her son Carmen, went to her bedside from New York, and together with others and everything in the power to save her life, but all to no avail. The Crones came to Beach in the fall of 1910 and in the spring of 1911 moved to a claim in the Trotters territory, where she lived until last summer when she went to Colchester for a visit. While here she made many friends who will indeed be sorry to learn of her sudden demise.


February 21st, 1919

Anderson - Bryce Nuptials

Anges Anderson and Arthur Bryce were married in the German Lutheran church in this city Wednesday morning at 11 o’clock, by Rev. Trinklein. The bride was very becomingly attired in a dress of dark green, georgelle crepe and wore a toque gray hat and shoes to match. The contracting couple were attended by Albert and Mable Anderson, brother and sister of the bride. The groom is one of the substantial young men of the Edgehill country and can be classed among the pioneers of the Golden Valley, having come to Beach in 1908. About that time he made a homestead entry for the land in the Edgehill territory which he now owns and which he has greatly improved. He is made of those sterling qualities that command admiration and respect in all places and is now classed as one of the substantial and prosperous farmers of that territory. Mrs. Bryce is one of the charming and substantial young ladies of the Edgehill vicinity, where she has lived for the past ten years with the exception of the time spend at her claim near Forsythe. Both of the happy couple have a host of friends who unite in wishing them life’s full measure of happiness and prosperity, in which The Advance wishes to join. They will be at home to friends after March 1st, at their farm.


February 21st, 1919

At 10:30 Wednesday morning, in the Catholic parsonage, Father Hake pronounced the words that made Miss Ethel Chandler and William Dilley, man and wife. The bride was beautifully gowned in a gold chiffon taffeta with Alice blue georgette crepe over drape, and wore a black tocque hat. She carried a large bouquet of yellow roses and orange blossoms, making a very petty figure. The bride was attended by Miss Mary McCarthy, who wore a light tan georgette dress with a large hat of tan and brown. Erban Theisan acted as best man. The bride has lived here almost since Beach was first started, has attended the city schools and is a graduate of the high school of this city. Her genial and helpful disposition and sterling worth have won her many friends. The groom has also been a resident of this territory for a number of years and has many warm friends among his large acquaintance. The happy couple left on No. 3 for a short honeymoon trip in the west. It is probable that upon their return they will occupy the groom’s farm north of Beach during the coming year at least. The many friends of the young couple extend to them best wishes for a life of happiness and prosperity, and in this The Advance desires to be included.


February 28th, 1919

Mrs. Joe Florek, Dead

Mrs. Joe Florek died in the asylum at Warm Springs, Mont., Saturday morning. She had been in poor health for some time and about three weeks ago she was taken to the hospital in order that she might have better care and attention, but death claimed her. Deceased was 70 years of age and resided with her husband on a farm near St. Phillips for the past twelve years. Her remains were buried in the cemetery at St. Phillips on Tuesday of this week, after a sermon by Father Ciesleiviez of Wibaux. She is survived by a husband, three daughters and three sons.


February 28th, 1919

Pleasant Surprise On Wm. Middleton

About thirty of the Rocky Butte neighbors, friends and relatives of William Middleton got together last Saturday evening and made a joint celebration of the two birthdays, namely George Washington’s and Mr. Middleton’s. Mrs. J. E. Middleton acted as hostess for the occasion, and with some assistance, served the guests to a sumptuous turkey dinner at 6:30. Everyone was in high spirits and lively music, patriotic songs and visiting more than furnished amusement for an enjoyable evening until about 11:30 when they departed for home. Best wishes for many more such happy birthdays were extended to Mr. Middleton and his hearty laugh seems to prophecy the fulfillment of their wish.


February 28th, 1919

Baby Kidder

The death of Robert Lemon Kidder, the eight months old baby of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Kidder, occurred at the home near Trotters last Wednesday morning about 6 o’clock from pneumonia. Robert had only been ill a few days with the flu, which developed into pneumonia before death occurred. Funeral services were held in this city, Thursday afternoon by Rev. Bosworth and the little one was laid at rest in the Beach cemetery. There are the parents and two brothers, Glenn, aged three and Leland, aged seven, to mourn his death. The Advance extends its sympathy to the sorrowing family.


February 28th, 1919

William Prouse

The death of William Prouse occurred at his daughter’s home in Golva, last Saturday evening, February 22nd, of complications. He was apparently in fairly good health when he and his wife came west from their home in Aberdeen, S.D., to visit with their daughter. Deceased was 67 years of age. He was born in Canada, of parents of English descent. We have been unable to get full particulars, other than that he was shipped to his old home at Aberdeen for burial. The funeral will take place Monday. He leaves a wife and daughter that we know of and to these heartfelt sympathy is extended.


February 28th, 1919

A wire was received by I. H. Claggett from N.D. Reade of Deer Lodge, Mont., telling of the death of their oldest son. The message was to be forwarded to Mrs. John Herrick of Trotters, N.D., who is attending her daughter, Mrs. Pearl Edwards to whom was recently born a baby daughter, and which will make it impossible for her to go west. It was only a short time ago that her daughter, Mrs. F. French, died of the flu and was buried here. Later both she and her youngest daughter contracted the disease and were quite sick. Taken all in all Mrs. Herrick has had a great deal of sorrow. We surely extend our sympathy, both to herself and family and to her daughter in Deer Lodge, Mont., in the last loss in the family circle.


February 28th, 1919

The children in the McCullum, Quaale and Sivesind families and Beatrice Petty, were guests of Alfred Oldis, Thursday, the occasion being his twelfth birthday.


March 7th, 1919

Mrs. Howard Stockwell

The sudden and very unlooked for death of Mrs. Howard Stockwell occurred in the Moorehead hospital last Monday morning at 3 a.m. She left Beach sometime before Christmas to make her sister in Moorehead a visit. A week ago she was taken to the hospital with the influenza, with which had been attacked, and was not ill long before pneumonia set in, making her a victim to the dread epidemic. A baby girl which was born to Mr. and Mrs. Stockwell, Sunday, died the same day. Both Mother and child will be brought to Beach for burial Saturday afternoon. All arrangements have not been made at this writing and friends who wish to know the exact hour of the funeral can call either the Mathisons or Mrs. Matt Smith, to whose home she will be taken upon arrival in Beach. The deceased was born near Dale, Minn., in the year of 1894, making her about 25 years of age at time of death. She lived at that place until two years old, when her parents moved to Moorehead, making that city her home until in the eight grade at school, when she came west and finished her school work at this place. For the next two years she made her home with her sister, Mrs. M. Mathison, while on the farm north of town. From there she went back to Moorehead and started a nursing course, which was interrupted by a serious operation and impairment of health. Later she was employed as nurse at the Libson hospital, resigning this position to marry Howard Stockwell, with whom she became acquainted while making her home with her sister. The marriage ceremony was performed on January 4, 1916, and they went immediately to the farm home of the groom north of this city. During her years of residence in Beach and surrounding country she made many friends, who will learn with sorrow of her unexpected death. With these people The Advance wishes to join in extending sympathy to the bereaved husband and relatives. Besides her husband she is survived by a father, N. T. Lunder, a step mother, Mrs. Caroline Lunder, three sisters, Mrs. Carl Tangstad of Winnipeg, Mrs. T. J. Thompson of Moorehead, and Mrs. M. Mathison of Beach, besides two half sisters, Constance and Nora Lunder of Moorehead. Also two brothers, Theodore, of Moorehead, and Nels of Baker, Mont., besides a half brother, Clarence, who lives near Dale, Minn.


March 7th, 1919

Arlie Hayden of Golva, visited Miss Florence Kirkpatrick one day this week.


March 7th , 1919

The many people who know Mrs. Glenn Taylor, will be sorry to learn of her brother’s death, Lloyd Ruff, which occurred last Friday at his home in Kansas City. Mrs. Taylor went east for the funeral and will probably remain for a few weeks with her parents.


March 7th, 1919

W. G. Olson, a farmer of the north country, received word Tuesday morning that his father had died at Detroit, Mich. The father was a very old man and it is believed his death was caused from old age. His son William left Tuesday afternoon for Detroit to attend the funeral, which will be held the latter part of this week.


March 7th , 1919

The marriage of Guy Whitaker and Miss Minnie Goodwin took place in Glendive last Tuesday, March 4th. Justice of the Peace Dunkham performed the ceremony which made them man and wife and the witnesses were F. A. Parroet and M. K. Parroet. The happy couple returned to Beach on No. 2 the same day. Miss Goodwin came to Beach last fall from St. Paul, to keep house for Mr. Whitaker and look after his children. They formed an agreeable friendship and just before she went to St. Paul on a visit last January, decided upon a marriage. On her return Mr. Whitaker joined her in Sentinel Butte and they went immediately to Glendive. Mr. Whitaker has lived in Beach and vicinity for the past twelve years and is well known to the people of this community. Although Miss Goodwin has not been here very long, she has made many friends. The Advance joins with their numerous acquaintances in wishing them a prosperous wedded life.


March 7th, 1919

H. O. Doering received the sad news the first of the week that his sister-in-law died at the Dickinson hospital on Monday morning, of complications. She leaves a husband and three boys, aged 13, 11 and 4 to mourn her loss. The remains will be buried at Belfield Thursday afternoon, H. O. Doering being present at the funeral.


March 7th, 1919

C. J. B. Turner returned Wednesday from Intermere, N.D. where he had been called because of the serious illness and death of his mother.


March 14th, 1919

Popular Young Couple Married Thursday

A very petty church wedding took place at the St. Paul’s Lutheran church Thursday, when Rev. Trinklein performed the ceremony that united Leonard Trester and Ida Bublitz in the holy bonds of matrimony. The happy young couple were attended by a brother and sister, Herbert Bublitz and Herta Trester. Also a number of relatives and friends were present. The groom is an energetic and prosperous farmer of the south country, coming here nine years ago to take up a homestead, where the young people plan to make their home. The bride is a charming young miss of Chama and has made many friends among her circle of acquaintances and will continue to win the confidence she deserves in her new home. The Advance joins with the many friends in wishing them joy, prosperity and happiness.


March 14th, 1919

Card of Thanks

We wish to express our sincere thanks to the people who extended their help and assistance during the illness and death of our beloved wife, sister and daughter, and for the expressions of sympathy which have been tendered.
Howard Stockwell and Relatives


March 14th, 1919

Oliver Olson

Oliver Olson, of Carlyle, who has been ailing for the past three years, died the 4th of March, at the home of his parents. The young man contracted tuberculosis from his brother three years ago, when sharing the same bed with him and since that time has been gradually losing his health. His remains were buried at Carlyle, March 6th. Oliver would have been 28 years of age had he live one more day. He was a clean, big-hearted fellow and will be greatly missed by his friends and relatives. He leaves his parents and two sisters, Selma and Alma, to mourn his loss. His brother died about six months ago with the same disease.


March 14th, 1919

Surprise on William Smith

Last Monday evening the neighbors and many friends got together and gave a surprise to William Smith, it being his fiftieth birthday. The guests arrived about 8 o’clock and started right in with the fun making. Games of all kinds were played, readings were given, popular and patriotic songs were sung and cards finished up the evenings entertainment, after which lunch was served. All wished Mr. Smith many happy returns of the day before leaving for their various homes.


March 21st, 1919

Mrs. L. B. Westby received a message last Friday morning of the serious illness of her mother, Mrs. A. W. Wanvig, of Milwaukee. Just after she had left for the east word came to Mr. Westby that Mrs. Wanvig had passed away.


March 21st, 1919

H. Kuhn family received an official notice from the war department that the grave of their son, G. H. Kuhn, who was killed in action a few months ago, had been marked and the family were given the exact location. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Well also received a similar notice in regard to the grave of their son Preston.


March 21st, 1919

Baby Kiedrowski

The two year old baby of Mr. and Mrs. Felix Kiedrowski, died at St. Phillips, March 18th. The child was troubled with its stomach, which was the cause of its untimely death. Funeral services were held in the church at St. Phillips, by the Wibaux priest, Thursday. Besides the parents the baby leaves several sisters and brothers to mourn its loss.


March 21st, 1919

Walter A. Walker

The death of Walter A. Walker, aged 45, occurred at his home east of Sentinel Butte, last Saturday, the 15th of March. The report says he died of complications. His remains were buried from his home at 10:30 Tuesday morning. He was a single man and has no relatives in this part of the country so far we could learn.


March 28th, 1919

Charles A. Lundin Died Tuesday

One of Golden Valley County’s Most Prosperous Farmers Passed Away after a Short Illness on His Return from a Trip Through California and Eastern Points

Seldom is a newspaper called upon to perform a more sorrowful task that is allotted to The Advance this week in chronicling the sudden death of Charles A. Lundin, which took place at the Callender Hotel in this city, Tuesday evening, March 25th, from oedema of the lungs. Widely known and greatly respected and admired throughout the entire western part of the state as a man of unimpeachable honor, progressive idea and filled with a spirit of public good, he will be mourned as a personal loss, not only in the community in which he lived, but throughout the entire county. Mr. and Mrs. Lundin returned last week Thursday from a month’s visit in California, and while enroute home stopped off at Valley City to visit their son and daughter, who are attending school there. Mr. Lundin was not feeling upon their arrival here and decided to stay at the hotel until sufficiently recovered to make the trip to his home, fifteen miles southeast of Beach. He grew worse instead of better, although as late as Monday it was not realized by the family that his condition was serious. Death claimed him Tuesday evening. Charles A. Lundin was born in Sweden, June 5th, 1861, and was therefore, 58 years of age last June. He started life a cripple and for a number of years was compelled to use crutches, on account of which handicap he got but little schooling. When a mere boy he took up the blacksmithing trade and followed that craft for more than twenty years.
Early Life A Hardship
While his early life carried a much greater burden than is usually the lot of man, yet he frequently referred with great satisfaction to the years of work and saving before he could purchase his first crude set of blacksmithing tools. He finally bought them and began business for himself. At an age when most American boys are still at school and writing home for money, this Swedish boy was hewing his own way in the world, and learning those valuable lessons in self-reliance which rendered him capable of doing big things when golden opportunity finally threw open to him her larger portals.
Sailed for America
When still a young man in Sweden, he suffered a financial reverse, and later sold his shop and took a business course in one of the cities of that country. Finally, at 26, he bade the folks at home good-by and sailed for America, eventually reaching Omaha, Neb., a strange lad in a strange land. This was back in the latter eighties. Times were none to brisk, financial depression was pending, and nothing but the most common of menial labor was to be found. Wages were not above one dollar and a quarter a day. The young man stuck to the task, however, learned the English language, and having partially overcome his lameness, saved up enough in a few years to enable him to go in search of a homestead, which he eventually located at Melville, N.D., in the central part of the state. It was in the summer of 1893 when he filed on this homestead and built his first home in American. About this time the panic - long pending - broke upon the country, and times have never been harder than they were in those days of strikes, lockouts, and Coxey’s army maneuvers. The young man had a lively time of it, earning his grubstake and making the necessary improvements, but make it he did. He resided in that community for seventeen years. It was there that he was married and his three children were born. For several years he combined farming with blacksmithing; later he added a wagon shop to his blacksmith shop, and finally he went into the hardware and machinery business. In 1910 he sold out his interests there and moved to Golden Valley county, where he purchased several sections of land and began farming of a large scale. How well he succeeded in this venture is evidenced by his splendid property. The Lundin farm property consists of about six sections of land over half of which is under cultivation, while the reminder is devoted to pasturage and grazing. The ‘home place’ comprises about 1700 acres, and the main buildings are located on an almost level section, which is fenced, cross fenced and laid out in a manner calculated to reduce to the minimum the work of farming on such a mammoth scale. Perhaps no set of farm buildings on The Slope forms a prettier picture than does those of the Lundin farm. The great white farm house to the north and the various barns, granaries, bunk houses, garages, etc., at the east, south and west. The house, barns and yard are lighted with electricity and when all the lights are on in the evening, the place presents the appearance of a small village. Sewage, bath, hot and cold water, laundry - in fact, every convenience of the best city home - can be found here, and the family is denied nothing which contributes to physical comfort. The king who “waded through glory to a throne” did but little when compared with a boy of foreign birth and a cripple in his youth, who has waded thus through all kinds of handicaps to a place of opulence and influence in the land of his adoption. Mr. Lundin was a member of the Masonic fraternity and the funeral services were conducted from the local Masonic Temple, Thursday morning at 11 o’clock. The beautiful and impressive Masonic ceremonies were followed, augmented by a prayer by the Rev. Tjornhom, of the Scandinavian Lutheran church. Interment was made in the local cemetery. As a mark of respect for the greatest man in Golden Valley county, neighbors and friends from the north, south, east and west, came to Beach to be present at the last sad rites of the departed. The floral tribute was also profuse and most beautiful. All business houses in Beach were closed from 10:30 to 12. The immediate family of Mr. Lundin consists of a wife, one son, Nicholas, and two daughters, Enola and Ruby, to whom the entire community extends sincere sympathy in their hour of sorrow and heavy affliction.


March 28th, 1919

Burgreen - Brown

The wedding of Bea Brown and Miss Emily Mae Burgreen took place at the United Brethern church Saturday afternoon at 4:00 p.m. Rev. Smeltzer pronounced the words that made the happy young couple man and wife. The bride was very prettily dressed in dark blue taffeta, and the groom wore the conventional black, while the bridesmaid Mrs. J. H. Brown wore a gray silk poplin and J. H. Brown as best man was dressed in black. All the relatives attended the wedding ceremony, and immediately afterwards escorted the happy couple to the depot, when they caught No. 3 for Glendive to spend the week end with friends at that place. Upon their return Monday they went at once to the farm of the groom’s mother at Chama where they expect to make their future home on the old homestead, and here again their many friends showed their kindness by preparing a lovely supper for them. The groom has lived in Beach and the surrounding community for years and needs no introduction to the people of this place, while the bride has many warm friends who wish them luck in taking up their new life.


March 28th, 1919

North Fork Items

Mrs. McCallum and family attended the wedding of her brother, Ben Brown, Saturday, at Beach.


March 28th, 1919

We are sorry to chronicle the death of Walter Walker, which occurred at his home, Saturday, March 15th. The remains were laid to rest in the Sentinel Butte cemetery. He leaves a son, DeWitt Walker, a mother, and a sister, Mrs. Charles Walker, to mourn his loss. They sympathy of friends and neighbors go out to them in their sorrow.


March 28th, 1919

Emma Wright and Ben Brown were married at Beach, Saturday. They went east for a short honeymoon trip before going to the groom’s home near Chama.


March 28th, 1919

Bonnie View Notes -
O. R. Krull returned last Thursday from Sioux City, Iowa, where he was called by the death of his mother.


March 28th, 1919

James Burke returned to Beach, Thursday after a few days visit at Bemidji, Minn., with his wife and little daughter, Mary Marguerite, born the 19th of March.


March 28th, 1919

Ollie News Items -
Mrs. Ed Burgess and children left Ollie about a month ago for Seattle, Washington, where she joined her husband, who left with Mr. McFarland to work with the ice crew. The flu was raging its worst at Seattle when they arrived. Mrs. Burgess contracted the disease and died early Thursday morning, March 20, 1919. Her body was shipped to Beach, Saturday and was buried Sunday in the Catholic cemetery. The children also had the flu and were unable to make this trip. Mr. Burgess will return to Seattle in a short time to bring the children back.


March 28th, 1919

Golva News Items -
Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Bares are the proud parents of an eleven pound baby boy, born Thursday, March 20.


March 28th, 1919

Golva News Items -
Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Clarin, Friday, March 21, a boy.


March 28th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Krcma are the proud parents of a baby girl, born March 22.


March 28th, 1919

Helen Louis Hollar

On the 19th of this month the death of little Helen Louis Hollar occurred at her parent’s home, five miles south of Beach. The child had been ailing for several weeks and although everything that could be was done for her, death claimed her. Helen was only six years and five months old and was just at the age when she was a great deal of comfort around the home. The Hollars came west last fall from Indiana, thinking the change in climate would help Mrs. Hollar, who had very poor hearth. The farm seemed to help her, but a new and unlooked for trouble came to the family when little Helen broke down in health and died. It is to the parents and three living children that the community wishes to extend its sympathy. The services were held from the house March 21st, Rev. Smeltzer of the United Brethen church ministering the words of comfort to the sorrowing family.


March 28th, 1919

Mrs. Sarah Burgner

The body of Mrs. Sarah Burgner was shipped back to Beach from Spokane, Wash., to be buried in the Catholic cemetery at this place. They had been farming south of Beach for a number of years until last fall, when he decided to go west for a change. He was employed in a garage at Seattle, and they found everything very agreeable until she contracted the flu, which turned into pneumonia and death claimed her on March 19th. She was 28 years, six months and four days old at time of demise. She is survived by her husband, to whom the community extends sympathy in his hour of sorrow.


March 28th, 1919

Birthday Party

A birthday party was given last Monday on Miss Dorothy Smeltzer, the eleven year old daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Smeltzer. About thirty guests, composed of a few older people arrived at 4:30 and enjoyed a good time until 6:00 when a delicious supper was served. The young people entertained themselves by games and music, and the older people with fancy work and social conversation. Little Miss Dorothy was wished many more happy returns of the day, before the guests departed.


March 28th, 1919

C. H. Clark received the sad news Wednesday that his mother, Mrs. C. E. Clark, of Winona, Minn., had died Tuesday. Mr. Clark left Thursday noon to attend the funeral.


April 4th, 1919

Sudden Death of Mrs. Pierzina At Dickinson Last Sunday Morning

A Member of the First Settlers of the Golden Valley Funeral Services Wednesday

The sad news of the death of Mrs. John I. Pierzina was received here Monday and it came as a shock to the community. Mrs. Pierzina passed away at the Dickinson hospital, Sunday morning at 6:00, following an operation for gall stones. Mrs. Pierzine (sic) had enjoyed the blessing of good health until recently, when she became troubled, and on the advice of her physician sought relief by an operation, which proved fatal. Hattie Giernza was born in Germany, September 26, 1875. She came with her folks to this country when but 12 years of age and the family settled at Arcadia, Wisconsin, where she grew to womanhood and it was here she met and married John I. Pierzina, February 18, 1895. Eleven years ago the 26th of March the family came west and made their home north of Beach. Nine children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Pierzine and all are living except Gertrude, an infant daughter, who preceded her mother in death. All the remainder of the family were staying at home except Ignatious, who entered the service of the U. S. as train dispatcher and was stationed at Leona, Wisconsin, where he has been for nearly a year. The life history of Mrs. Pierzina is well known since she came here, having lived here eleven years. She was of the sturdy pioneer stock, to which this country owes so much: modest, retiring, unassuming and with a splendid character. Always ready to aid in sickness and distress, an exemplary mother, a devoted wife. Mrs. Pierzina was comparatively young and always enjoyed God’s most blessed gift, good health. It seems to us of this earth that death is untimely, but God, in His all wise wisdom, knew best. He has taken her away to dwell in Heaven. She was a firm believer in the faith and received the Holy Sacrament of the church before her death. Mr. Pierzina and daughter Mayme were present at the time of death, being called Friday on account of her condition, as fear was held for her recovery. Funeral services were held at the home in the morning at 8:00 and in the Catholic church at 10:00 o’clock. A large concourse of sorrowing friends were present. Many beautiful floral offerings were presented. Father Hake officiated in the last sad rites. He eulogized the departed for her firm faith and character. She leaves to mourn her demise, a husband, John I. Pierzina, and eight children, two daughters, Mayme and Laura, and six sons, John, Benjamin, Ignatious, Jerome, Alfred and Ralph, who is but a year and nine months old. The Advance joins with the community in extending condolences to the bereaved family.


April 4th, 1919

Bonnie View Notes -
On Friday evening a large crowd gathered at the Anderson home in the nature of a surprise, the occasion being their thirty-fifth wedding anniversary. Games and such furnished entertainment, after which refreshments were served. All departed for the respective homes wishing Mr. and Mrs. Anderson many future years of happiness.


April 4th, 1919

Garner & Boullion -
The many friends of Guy Allstot were surprised to hear of his marriage to Miss Gladys Cooper, of Alpha, which occurred at Wibaux, Monday, March 24th, at the Methodist church. J. R. Allstot acted as groomsman and Miss Lillian Winter as bridesmaid. The bride was very becomingly dressed in white mull. The happy couple took a short trip to Glendive, after which they returned to Alpha, to the home of the bride’s parents, where Mr. Allstot will farm. The community extends best wishes for a long and happy married life.


April 4th, 1919

Garnier & Boullion -
The people of this community were shocked to hear of the death of C. A. Lundin, on Wednesday. Mr. Lundin was such a good friend of everybody’s that he leaves a large number to mourn his sudden death.


April 4th, 1919

Little Miss Dorothy Manning went to Wibaux, Wednesday evening on No. 3, to attend a birthday party given for her cousin, Margerie Faltermeyer, at that place that evening.


April 4th, 1919

Ignatius Pierzina returned from Leona, Wis., Tuesday evening, having been called by the sudden death of his mother.


April 4th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Richards are rejoicing over a big baby boy, born to them Thursday, April 3rd.


April 4th, 1919

Mrs. Glenn Taylor arrived from New York, Thursday morning. She was called east on account of the illness and death of her brother.


April 4th, 1919

On Wednesday of this week a most charming and happy young couple paid this office a pleasant visit and requested publication of the following notice: “Mr. and Mr. Carl Baer left Wednesday afternoon for Spokane, Wash., on their honeymoon trip. A beautiful little romance was enacted in Miles City, where the bride, Miss Marie Novak, has been for the past two years, her home being out of Carlyle. Mr. Baer has been in Miles City for only two weeks, during which time the couple became acquainted and in this remarkable short time he won the bride’s consent, were married and a quick visit to the home folks is now followed by the trip to the coast. They will be gone about a year. The couple send their love and best wishes to all friends and well wishers.” (Wibaux papers please copy)


April 4th, 1919

Sokoloski Baby Dies
The seven months old baby of Mr. and Mrs. Emil Soloski (sic), who live north of Sentinel Butte, died last Tuesday. We have been unable to learn the cause of death. The remains were laid at rest in the Beach cemetery on Thursday afternoon. Sympathy is extended to the family.


April 4th, 1919

Elizabeth Musil Died
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Musil died last Wednesday from a hard case of Croup. The remains will be buried from the home, Saturday, April 5th. Sympathy is extended to the sorrowing parents, sisters and brothers.


April 4th, 1919

First Marriage in New Church

First events always demand special mention. The union of Miss Sarah Gladys Cooper and Guy Edward Allstot, both of Alpha, North Dakota, graced this occasion. The groom was twenty and the bride sweet sixteen. The young people were accompanied by fathers of both, W. A. Cooper and Roy Allstot. Miss Marian Myers of the clerk’s office acted as bridesmaid and the groom’s father as best man. The ceremony was at noon, March 27th. The party autoed over from Beach returning the next day. The bride could not endure the thought of being married anywhere but in the sanctuary of a church, which by the way is a perfectly safe and proper notion. This promising young couple belong to the ranks of producers and will continue in that line. - Wibaux Pioneer.


April 11th, 1919

Martha Maria Yopp

The death of Mrs. Fred Yopp occurred at her home one and a half miles west of Beach, Saturday morning, April 5th, at 5 p.m. Martha Yopp was born at Woodbury, Minn., September 2, 1870, to Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Konig. At that place she grew to womanhood and on December 26, 1898, was united in marriage to Fred Yopp. They came to Beach sixteen years ago, in the year 1903, and settled on their farm a little way out of town. Mrs. Yopp was always sickly and four weeks ago she had scarlet fever, which brought about cerebral meningitis and her end. She suffered a great deal and four days before her death remained in a unconscious state. She was 39 years, seven months and three days old at the time of her demise. She leaves to mourn her loss a husband, two sisters, two brothers and eight children. Services were held at the home last Tuesday at 1 o’clock, and from the St. Paul’s Lutheran church at 2 o’clock. The church was well filled and showed that Mrs. Yopp was a much beloved woman in her home and community.


April 11th, 1919

Mrs. Thomas Jesok

The death of Mrs. Thomas Jesok occurred at her home in Alpha, Wednesday morning at 5:00 o’clock, of paralysis. She had been ailing for the past three years, and finally, at the age of 52 years, death claimed her as its own. The was born in Germany and came to this country at an early date, where she met and married Thomas Jesok. To this union were born seven boys, (three of whom are at home now) and six girls, all of whom are living to mourn her loss. Her husband also survives her. The funeral services will be held Sunday in Alpha, with Father Hack officiating. Her remains will be laid to rest in the cemetery at that place.


April 11th, 1919

Baby Lake

The funeral of baby Charles, son of Mr. and Mrs. George Lake, was held at their home, ten miles south west of Beach, last Tuesday, April 8th, at 1 o’clock p.m. The baby was first taken with the whooping cough and later “flu” developed by bronical pneumonia, which caused its early death. This was the youngest child in a family of four children and the only son. The father, mother and three sisters live to mourn the loss of a son and brother, and to these people we extend the community’s sympathy.


April 11th, 1919

Baby Hahn

The six week’s old baby of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hahn died last Tuesday of a severe cold, which had settled on its lungs. The family live six miles north of Beach on a farm, and it is at that place that the funeral services took place Thursday afternoon. Interment was made in the Beach cemetery. Sympathy is extended to Mr. and Mrs. Hahn and daughter Evelyn in their bereavements.


April 11th, 1919

Walter Noyes received word last week from Frank Power, a brother of John Power, that the latter died in Colorado and the body taken to Wadena, Minn., for burial last Monday. Sympathy is extended to the surviving brothers, Mike, Tom, Jim and Frank for the triple sorrow that has come to their family during the past year in the loss of a brother, mother and father.


April 11th, 1919

Edward Fillner, in company with his brother, William Fillner of Glendive, left Beach, Monday morning on No. 4 for Long Wood, Wis., where they are going to attend the funeral of their sister, Mrs. Haskell McCarthey, who died Saturday morning, of pneumonis, and buried Tuesday afternoon. A sister, Mrs. A. C. Farewell of Glendive, passed through Beach, Sunday going to Long Wood, to attend the funeral.


April 18th, 1919

Betty Brucher celebrated her fourth birthday on Saturday afternoon. Fifteen little girls were present. A delicious lunch was served in the afternoon. Many lovely presents were received and everybody present spent a very pleasant afternoon.


April 18th, 1919

A number of the friends of Mrs. B. Covert met at her home Saturday, for a whist party, it being her birthday. Many beautiful presents were given to Mrs. Covert and a delicious lunch was served by the ladies.


April 18th, 1919

Mr. Hartman, a civil war veteran died at his home Wednesday. Funeral services were held at Rhame, Friday. He leaves a family to mourn his loss.


April 18th, 1919

Ollie New Items -
Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Stark returned Monday from Austin, Minn., where Mrs. Stark attended her father’s funeral.


April 18th, 1919

Last Thursday evening the young people of Ollie were very pleasantly entertained at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. J. B. Turner, the occasion being the birthday of their son, Charles, although that was kept a secret until a little bird told. The evening was spent in music and games and at 11 o’clock a most delicious lunch was served. Charles was presented with a purse as a slight reminder of his having passed his seventeenth milestone. The young people left at a late hour, voting Mr. and Mrs. Turner fine entertainers. Those present were Misses Beach, Hopper, Rogers, Prouty, Esmay, Stark, Gift, and Messrs. West, Shepherd, Hopper, Sherva, Hoverson, Martin and Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Young.


April 18th, 1919

Frank C. Green

The death of Frank C. Green, the 13 day old baby of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Breen (sic), occurred Wednesday morning, April 4th. The child had contracted a severe cold which developed pneumonia, which proved too much for its weakened condition. The funeral services were held Thursday morning at 10 o’clock, from the house, and were conducted by Rev. Smeltzer. The parents and four children are left to mourn the baby’s loss.


April 18th, 1919

Death of Mrs. Frank Haigh

The death of Mrs. Frank Haigh occurred at her home out of Carlyle, Thursday evening, at 12 p.m. A little boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. Haigh last Sunday and immediately afterwards the mother contracted the “u,” which proved fatal for her almost at once. The four children and Mr. Haigh are just able to be around after a hard seige of the “flue,” and it is thought that she contracted the disease from them. Mrs. Haigh was born in Wisconsin in 1892. She met and married Frank Haigh and after three years of married life in Wisconsin they moved to Beach and located on the farm near Carlyle, about eleven years ago. To this union five children were born, the youngest of whom is in a very critical condition at this writing. The remains will be taken to Oshkosh, Wis., for burial, leaving here Saturday morning on No. 4. Mrs. Haigh’s sister, Mrs. Frank Fitzgerald, who came Wednesday morning, will accompany the remains east, as will also Mr. Haigh. The community extends sympathy to the sorrowing family in their hour of trouble.


April 18th, 1919

Miller - Zinsli Wedding

The wedding of Mrs. Laura Miller of Beach, and Lawrence Zinsli of Sentinel Butte, took place at the Methodist parsonage at Wibaux, the Rev. Hulbert officiating. The bride was very prettily gowned in a brown traveling dress with hat and shoes to match, while the groom wore conventional black. Directly after the ceremony the couple were given the best of well wishes by the relatives present and returned to Beach. After this week they will be at home to friends on the groom’s farm, four miles south of Sentinel Butte.


April 25th, 1919

Surprised and Celebrated

Last Sunday noon, upon returning from church, Mr. and Mrs. William Whitaker of this city were surprised to find the house full of friends, who had taken possession during their absence and had come to properly celebrate the wedding anniversary of the Whitakers, and the unexpected arrival of Mrs. J. M. Whitaker from Dunn Center added to the pleasant features of the occasion. The fifty or more guests then sat down to a sumptuous feast, and no like occasion was more enjoyed by all present than this happy recurrence of the most important event in the life of the main celebrants.


April 25th, 1919

Births

April 18, to Mr. and Mrs. F. B Peterson of Beach, a boy.
April 19, to Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Halstead of Beach, a girl.
April 19, to Mr. and Mrs. K. E. Larson, residing near Golva, a boy.


April 25th, 1919

Mike Jesok, wife and sister arrived Friday from Minnesota to attend the funeral of his mother.


April 25th, 1919

Death of Alvin Sorenson

Sunday, Alvin Jens Sorenson, the four-months-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Jens Sorenson of this city, was laid to rest in the Lutheran cemetery, his little soul having flown back to his maker Good Friday, April 18th. The funeral services were held in the German Lutheran church and were largely attended by the many friends of the family. The cause of death was bronchial pneumonia, an older brother being sick with the same trouble. The little one is survived by his parents and two older brothers, who have the sympathy of the community. In this connection Mr. and Mrs. Sorenson wish to thank their many friends for comfort and sympathy shown during the sickness and death of the loved one and for the wealth of flowers that so beautifully concealed the ipress of the grim reaper.


May 2nd, 1919

Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Knute Larson, on Saturday, April 19, a boy.


May 2nd, 1919

Michael Strohmeyer

It is with the deepest regret that we relate the death of Michael Strohmeyer, eight- year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Sebastian Strohmeyer, residing a few miles south of Golva. On returning home from church last Friday he was left to hold the horses which were rather unruly. The horses ran the buggy into a wagon causing him to fall out. He was discovered by his mother and a doctor was called immediately but he lived only a few hours after the accident. The entire community joins in offering deepest sympathy to the bereaved one. Interment was made in the Burkey cemetery Sunday at 2 o’clock.


May 2nd, 1919

Eleanor Loretta Haigh

We regret to chronicle the death of Eleanor Loretta Haigh, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Haigh, who died Saturday afternoon. The funeral took place Monday at 2 o’clock at the Catholic church at Burkey, and interment was made in the Burkey cemetery.


May 2nd, 1919

Ollie News Items -
Mrs. Frank Koste. . . . . received the sad news of her sister’s death at Omaha, Neb., last week.


May 2nd, 1919

Ollie News Items -
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Kramer are the proud parents of a baby boy, born April 24th.


May 2nd, 1919

Ollie News Items -
G. W. Hopper died in a hospital in Miles City, April 18th, following an operation. His death was a great shock to the community as he was ill only a few days. Although a man of retiring disposition he was loved and honored by all who knew him. The funeral services were held in the Odd Fellows hall, April 22, and his remains were laid at rest in the Ollie cemetery. Rev. Thayer officiated. His wife and aged parents and other relatives have the sympathy of the whole community in their loss.


May 2nd, 1919

Jacob M. Wilkens died last Saturday at Alpha, aged 56 years. He was buried at Alpha, Tuesday.


May 2nd, 1919

W. F. Brandt returned Sunday from Clayton, Mont., where he had been called by the sickness of his sister. He arrived five hours after her death, but was enabled to be present at the last sad rites. The many friends of Mr. Brandt will sympathize in his sorrow.


May 2nd, 1919

David Hubbell Dead

David E. Hubbell, aged 73 years, and a resident of Beach for the past three years, but for some years back a farmer of this Valley, died of old age at his home in this city Sunday. Funeral services were held at his late home Tuesday afternoon and the remains taken to Wibaux for burial. He is survived by a son at Wibaux, and his wife of this city, and two sons, Welcome and Wilson Hubbell, of Orange Grove, Oregon. Mr. Hubbell has been an invalid ever since he located in Beach and his death was not unexpected. He is mourned by a large circle of friends whose sympathy goes out to the bereaved helpmeet (sic) and to the sons.


May 9th, 1919

Henry Boerger Dead

Henry Boeger (sic), who resided south of Burkey, died Tuesday at the age of 56 years, the cause of death being pneumonia. Mr. Boerger was a native of Germany, but had resided in this country for a number of years and was one of the respected farmers of the Burkey neighborhood. The funeral services were held in the Catholic church at Burkey, Wednesday afternoon, interment being in the cemetery there.


May 9th, 1919

Celebrated Seventh Anniversary Of Jones Wedding

Sunday evening Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Reeve of Third avenue, gave a little impromptu celebration of the seventh anniversary of the wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Mark F. Jones, that was altogether delightful and in consonance with the record of the host and hostess for genial hospitality. At six o’clock a dainty supper was enjoyed, the piece de resistance being a wedding cake adorned with seven candles, and distributed by the honored guests amid the well wishes of the friends present. After supper a pleasant evening was spent with music and closed with congratulations to the seven-year-weds and wishes for many returns of the day. Those present, in addition to the host and hostess were: Mr. and Mrs. Jones, Dr. and Mrs. Museus and W. F. Cushing.


May 9th, 1919

Farmer Shoots Himself - Cause of Suicide Unknown

L. G. Garley, living five miles north of Sentinel Butte, committed suicide last Monday morning about 9 a.m., by shooting himself through the head with a 32 rifle, killing himself instantly. Cause for the suicide is unknown as Mr. Barley was a very regular young man of good habits, and his motive for it is a mystery. He was 36 years of age, a single man, and had been a resident of this vicinity for the past 11 years, his occupation being farming during that time. He leaves to mourn his loss, Mrs. Drennan and Mrs. Kenyon, of Sentinel Butte, and Mrs. Hilman of Minneapolis, sisters. Funeral services were held at the Sentinel Butte Congregational church Wednesday afternoon, and interment was made in the cemetery at that place.


May 16th, 1919

Adolph Haugse Buried With Military Honors
Splendid Young Man and Brave Soldier Buried At Sentinel Butte

Few funerals at Sentinel Butte have been more largely attended than that of Private Adolph Haugse which took place there Friday afternoon, for as man and soldier, he was a credit to his American citizenship and to the surviving relatives. Pvt. Haugse enlisted in the service of his country early in the war in South Dakota, saw hard front line service in France, and was among those sent home, in care of a hospital unit, suffering from rheumatism. Later he contracted scarlet fever and died at the army hospital at Leavenworth, at the age of 24 years, from which place his body was brought to Sentinel Butte, the home of his father, J. F. Haugse, who with another son and a daughter, survive him. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. A. T. Tjornhom of Beach, in the Sentinel Butte Congregational church, the pall bearers being six returned soldiers in uniform. The interment was in the Sentinel Butte cemetery.


May 16th, 1919

Lonette Page celebrated her 11th birthday Saturday by entertaining a number of friends at her home.


May 16th, 1919

The Tom Kirkpatrick family spent Sunday at the Charles Smith home, near Sentinel Butte.


May 16th, 1919

Ollie News Item -
A baby boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. Blain Bryson, Wednesday morning but the little one was destined to live on this earth only three short days. He died Saturday morning at 8 o’clock. Funeral services were held at the home Sunday at 1 o’clock and the remains were laid to rest in the Carlyle cemetery.


May 16th, 1919

Mrs. Ray Petty was called to Onawa, Iowa, last week by the serious illness of an uncle who died before she arrived.


May 16th, 1919

Mrs. Essene’s Mother Dead

Mrs. F. J. Essene and three younger children left for Montevideo, Minnesota, early Wednesday morning in response to a telegram saying her mother, Mrs. John Conrad, who had been sick for some time, was very low, and since Mrs. Essene’s departure word has come that the mother died Wednesday night. Mrs. Conrad was 66 years of age and was one of the oldest settlers of Montevideo. The many friends of Mrs. Essene will sympathize in her sorrow.


May 30th, 1919

Chas. O. Welch Succumbs To His Frightful Burns
Popular Beach Citizen Not Strong Enough To Resist Dread Tetanus
All Business In Beach Suspended During the Hour Of Funeral

The community was shocked Tuesday morning when the news spread that Charles O. Welch, who was so badly burned May 16, had succumbed from his injuries and had passed away the morning at 5:30 o’clock, the immediate cause of death being tetanus. Although suffering intensely from his frightful injuries Mr. Welch seemed on a fair way to recovery, but a turn for the worse came Sunday when the dread muscular spasms seized his depleted system, and all that medical science could do proved unavailing. Mr. Welch was one of the popular men of Beach, where he has resided for the past 12 years, engaged in the business of photography. He was born in Pennsylvania 42 years ago, remaining there until reaching young manhood, when he came west, eventually locating at Beach, where his manly character and genial disposition endeared him to a large circle of friends. Deceased leaves a wife and two children, a son and a daughter; his mother, Mrs. Anna F. Welch of Sweetbriar, N.D., and four brothers: Albert and Frank of Sweetbriar: David of Thermopolis, Wyn, and William a soldier in the American army in France, all of whom have the sincere sympathy of this community. The funeral was held Thursday morning at 10 a.m., at the United Brethern church, Rev. Smeltzer officiating, a wealth of flowers typifying the kindly remembrance in which the departed was held. All the business houses of the city were closed between the hours of 10 and 11 o’clock and the church was packed with those who desired in this way to pay their last respects to an esteemed friend and fellow citizen. Interment was in the Beach cemetery the pall bearers being, J. P. Smith, Theodore Schweitzer, Ray Andrews and A. C. Thompson.


May 30th, 1919

Mrs. F. J. Essene and children have returned from Montivideo, Minn., where they went to attend the funeral of Mrs. Essene’s mother.


May 30th, 1919

Celebrated Birthday
Robert Morris, son of S. R. Morris came home Sunday morning to celebrate his eighteenth birthday with “Dad,” after being out on the road with a bunch of Northern Pacific Railway surveyors for some weeks past. A festive occasion it was with Morris senior as chief cook and T. E. Hayward and W. F. Cushing as guests besides the recipient of the honor at a sumptuous dinner served at 3 p.m. at the Morris mansion on the hill. Robert returned to his work Monday, but was back home again Wednesday, he and others having been let out owing to the decision of the government to dispense with certain work in which their crew was engaged.


June 6th, 1919

Card Of Thanks

We wish to express our deep appreciation of the kindness, sympathy and help which was extended to us during the illness and death of our beloved husband and father, son and brother. Also for the beautiful floral offerings.
Mrs. C. O. Welch and children
Mrs. A. F. Welch and children


June 13th, 1919

The announcement is made in the Little Rock, Ark., papers that Mrs. V. G. White, 2103 Gaines street announces the engagement and approaching marriage of her daughter, Elizabeth Lee, to Harvey H. Walters of Beach, N.D., the wedding to take place June 18.


June 13th, 1919

Early Settler Of County Died At Spokane June 4

Mrs. Harriet M. Bronson, wife of Earnest B. Bronson, died at the Deaconess hospital, Spokane, Wash., June . . , 1919, at 7:15 p.m., aged 38 years, . . months and 18 days. Harriet M. Mason, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry C. Mason of Beach, N.Dak., was born in Juneau county, . . a, June 16, 1880. She moved with her family to South Dakota where on December 6, 1899, she was married to Earnest B. Bronson of Ramona. They resided in the vicinity of Ramona for several years, going from there to Beach, N.D., later to Hanna, Alberta, . . the past two years have lived in Spokane. Besides her parents and one sister, Mrs. Mary E. Faker, of Beach, she is survived by her husband and three sons, Hugh, Ward and Lyle, who mourn the loss of a kind and affectionate wife and mother, whose memory will always be cherished as their dearest possession. Mrs. Bronson, with her quiet, unassuming, lovable nature, made many friends who will sincerely sympathize with the family in their bereavement. She was laid to rest in beautiful . . . rside Park cemetery in Spokane, Wash., June 6, 1919.


June 13th, 1919

Ollie News Items -
Carter - Rost

On Saturday, May 31, 1919, Norman Rost and Miss Bertha Carter were married by the Rev. Livingston, at the Lutheran parsonage at Baker, Mont., and were attended by Grover Carter and Miss Ethel Wilson The groom is a son of Mr. and Mrs. Christ Rost, Sr., of Ollie, and has grown to manhood in this vicinity. He is one of our most worthy young men. The bride is the charming daughter of Mr. J. B. Carter, formerly of the Big Hill Country, and is one of Ollie’s popular young ladies. Mr. and Mrs. Rost expect to make their home with Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Rost, south of Ollie, for an indefinite length of time. On Friday evening the newlyweds entertained at a dance in the opera house. A large crowd danced until an early hour, when they departed, wishing Mr. and Mrs. Rost a long and happy life.


June 13th, 1919

Ollie News Items -
Hough - Surface

On Wednesday, May 28, 1919, Corporal Dwight L. Surface, of Oceola, Iowa, and Miss Clara Hough of Ottumwa, Iowa, were united in marriage by Rev. Stine, at Beach. Both of these young people were in the service for nearly a year. The bride wears the strip of gold on her sleeve, indicating six months foreign service. She was with Base Hospital No. 70, in France. The groom was located at Camp Dodge and was chorister for the Nineteenth Sanitary Train, having charge of the mounted section (800 men) of his company. Mr. Surface will be remembered as having formerly lived at Carlyle, Mont. Mr. and Mrs. Surface are at home on the Deer Creek ranch, ten miles southeast of Ollie, where Mr. Surface has gone into partnership with his brother-in-law, Victor A. Clocksin. The community wish the young married people much happiness in their life and prosperity in the new location.


June 13th, 1919

Fern Kirkpatrick is employed at the Slack restaurant at present.


June 13th, 1919

Mrs. James Donaldson left Sunday for Wheaton, Minn., to attend the funeral of her brother, on receipt of the sad news of his death.


June 20th, 1919

Mrs. John Scott and Miss Irma Orton gave a surprise party in honor of Miss Inez Orton, Friday evening, at the W. O. Orton home. The evening was pleasantly spent in playing games and dancing. Lunch was served to about forty guests. They departed at three o’clock wishing Miss Inez many happy birthdays.


June 20th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Connor are the proud parents of a baby girl, which arrived at their home June 12th. They have named it Jean Marion.


June 20th, 1919

Married

- At St. Phillips church Monday afternoon Miss Gertrude Wattbach and . . arney Pumke, both of Edgehill, Mont., were married. Miss Wattbach is a niece of Mrs. A. P. Kukowski and following the ceremony the bridal party repaired to the Kukowski home and enjoyed a fine wedding feast, after which the bride and groom departed for their Montana home.


June 20th, 1919

M. J. Bartley is at Eden Valley, Minn., where he will be married toward the end of the month to Miss Teresa Thielen of that city. The bride and groom will make the trip to Beach their wedding tour for the present and will be at home soon after July 1 in the residence already prepared for them in this city.


June 20th, 1919

F. G. Jennings Died Suddenly On Gardner Ranch

F. G. Jennings, a partner of George Gardner, died suddenly of heart disease at his home on the old Elkhorn or Gardner ranch, Tuesday evening. He had taken part that day in the wild west features that were being taken in moving pictures form at the ranch and when supper time came seemed to be in the best of health, and taking a lively part in the festivities that were going on at the ranch house. He stepped into a bedroom, and a few moments later one of the ladies found him dead on the bed. Mr. Jennings was one of the old timers of this region and one of the best known, having friends in all who knew him. He took an active part in keeping alive the enjoyments common to the cowboy days and has appeared in many of the sports of that nature that have been staged in this section.


June 20th, 1919

Mrs. S. R. Morris is expected to return from Reno, Nevada, next Saturday. Mrs. Morris and daughter Florence have been visiting the married daughter, Mrs. Hanson, who recently welcomed a baby boy in her family. Miss Florence will not return with her mother, as she will spend some time in California.


June 27th, 1919

Clare And Joe Strum Drowned In Old Coal Mine
Younger Boy Waded Into Deep Water - Brother Tried To Save Him
Younger Warner Has Narrow Escape While Trying To Save The Others

The entire community was shocked last Sunday evening by news that Clarence and Joseph Strum, aged nine and thirteen, sons of C. J. Strum, a farmer living near Thelen, had been drowned that afternoon in Penny’s open coal mine. The news of this distressing accident reached town when P. C. Erickson, an uncle of the boys, brought the bodies to town, and caused general sympathy with the bereaved family, the members of which are held in the highest esteem by all who know them. It appears the boys, together with a boy named Warner, went over to the coal mine in the afternoon for a walk and found the mine filled with water, it having a spring or two that fed it. The younger boy took off his trousers in order to do some wading and the first thing he knew he stepped off into a deep hole and went under. The older Strum boy rushed to his assistance only to also get in over his head, when Warner also jumped in to help them, but was unable to do so, he having much trouble in getting out himself. Warner gave the alarm and neighbors rushed to the mine and dived in a vain effort to locate the bodies, the water in places being 20 feet deep. Rakes were rigged up and eventually the bodies were recovered and brought to Beach. When the news of the drowning reached the Strum home a sister rushed from there to the mine and in so doing nearly died from overexertion and the heat, but is now all right. Mr. and Mrs. Strum were at church at Thelen when the tragedy occurred and were heartbroken when the news was brought them. Both the boys were bright fellows and their loss is sadly mourned in their neighborhood. Private funeral services were held at the Strum home Thursday noon and the public funeral at the Lutheran church at Beach at 2 o’clock in the afternoon, the entire countryside being present.


June 27th, 1919

Died

Anna Laura Dodd was born October 11, 1880 in Iowa. She was married to T. B. Thompson in Mason City, Iowa, January 21, 1909. Four children blessed this union, Johnathan, Sophia, Anna and Seth. Mr. Thompson and Johnathan preceded her in death. She passed this life June 17, 1919, at 5 p.m. Beside the three children, her father, mother, four brothers, four sisters live to mourn her loss. She was laid to rest June 20th in the cemetery north of Trotters. The funeral service was conducted by Rev. Thatcher, at the school house near her home.


June 27th, 1919

Warren and Chas. Kirkpatrick who have spent the winter in Washington, are now visiting their parents here.


June 27th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Bartley arrived from Eden Valley, Minn., where they were married early in the week, and are busy getting the new home here in shape.


June 27th, 1919

The stork graced the home of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Stecker Wednesday with a handsome baby girl over which there is great rejoicing especially as all are doing well.


June 27th, 1919

The home of A. E. Swan was brightened Wednesday by the arrival of a fine baby girl. Mother and child are doing well, but not half so well as the new papa.


June 27th, 1919

At Pretty Rock, this state, a three-months-old baby of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Preichel was killed by a hog. The infant was left asleep in the house while the parents were in the field, and during their absence a hog entered the place and in some way got at the child, eating its back off before its screams awoke the other children who drove the hog away. The baby died before a doctor could reach the scene.


July 4th, 1919

Samuelson - Steiner Wedding On Thursday
Popular Montana Rancher Marries One Of Beach’s Fairest Daughters

A very pretty wedding was solemnized at the home of Mrs. D. J. Steiner, Thursday morning when Miss Hazel Steiner was united in marriage to Mr. Harry Samuelson, a prosperous young farmer of Clark, ……. The bride was accompanied by Miss Esther Steiner, her sister as maid of honor, and the groomsman was H. F. Rase of Dickinson. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Charles H. Caton, of the Congregational church, the bride being given away by her mother. The bride looked charming in white crepe duchesne and carried a large bouquet of roses, the Mendelshon wedding march being played as the bridal party entered the room. The groom wore conventional black. After the ceremony a wedding dinner was served and the bridal party left for the west on the afternoon train, many friends being at the depot to say goodbye. Mr. and Mrs. Samuelson will accompany Mrs. Steiner and family as far as Miles City, where the entire party will visit relatives, after which the Steiners will proceed to their new home at Medford, Ore., and the Samuelsons will go to the groom’s farm near Clark, where they will be at home after July 10.


July 4th, 1919

Rev. Trinklein Is Married At Belfield
United To Charming Lady Surrounded By A Host Of Friends

The Belfield Times give the following interesting account of the marriage last Thursday afternoon of Rev. Trinklein of Beach and Miss Ella G. Schlewitz of Belfield, and the good wishes therein expressed will be heartily echoed by the people of Beach. A very pretty wedding was solemnized at the St. Peter’s Lutheran church Thursday afternoon, when Rev. Herbert J. Trinklein and Miss Ella G. Schlewitz were joined in the holy bonds of matrimony by Rev. H. A. Faedtke, of Wheaton, Minn., a former pastor of the bride. The little church on the hill was crowded to the brim and between two and three hundred people were unable to enter the church to witness the ceremony. Both the contracting parties are well and favorable known in Belfield and throughout this section of the country. Rev. Trinklein is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John S. Trinklein, of Saginaw, Michigan. Rev. Trinklein attended the Concordia college and military academy of Fort Wayne, Indiana, 1906-1912, graduating in 1912; 1912- 1915, Concordia seminary, St. Louis, Missouri, graduating in 1915. Immediately after becoming a pastor he came to Beach, N. Dak., here he has made his home since that time. Rev. Trinklein is pastor of churchs in Stark and Billings counties as well as Beach in North Dakota, and Wibaux, Dawson and Fallon counties in Montana. The young bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. D. F. Schlewitz, two miles east of town. Miss Schlewitz came to this country with her parents from Wheaton, Minn., in 1909. The old quotation, “to know her is to love her, none name her but to praise,” well fits Miss Schlewitz, and her friends are numerous and staunch. Capability and worth showed themselves in her every act and no one ever found her but in a sunny mood. The bride wore a beautiful gown of white gorgette crepe and carried a bouquet of pink roses. The attendants for the contracting parties were: Max and Olga Walz, Herman and Waldermar Schlewitz, Esther Gross and Louise Glade: flower girls, Evelyn Fuerstenau and Dorothy Fritz. The groom wore the conventional black. After the ceremonies the happy couple returned to the bride’s home, where they were congratulated by hundred of friends that came from all parts of Stark, Billings, Golden Valley, Dawson and Fallon counties. The day was happily spent by their many friends at the Schlewitz home. The happy young couple will make their home at Beach and may long life and prosperity bless them. On the wings of friendship and good will all Belfield joins with their many friends from else where in wishing them God speed in their journey through wedded life.


July 4th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Kostelecky are the proud parents of a baby girl, Irene Isabelle, born June 27th. Frank has a “smile that won’t come off,” these days.


July 4th, 1919

Mrs. and Mrs. CC. (sic) O. Brady are the proud parents of a baby boy, born on June 29th.


July 4th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. T. N. Kirkpatrick returned Thursday from Jordan, Mont., where they took Charles and Warren to their homesteads in that vicinity.


July 4th, 1919

Myrtle Kirkatrick spent Monday afternoon at the J. H. Sifert home.


July 4th, 1919

Mrs. Lucetta Scott Dead

Last Thursday Oscar Scott of this city received the sad news that his sister-in-law, Mrs. Lucetta E. Scott, had died that day at the home of her son, J. C. McCabe, in Fairfield, Iowa. Mrs. Scott lived in Beach about six years, only recently having been taken to Iowa by her son in the hope of restoring her health, which had been very poor for some time back. She was 69 years old. Her husband preceded her in death nine years ago at Waverly, Iowa, but she leaves three surviving children: Mrs. A. A. Wheeler of Springfield, Ills., Mrs. James Boyle of Fort Madison, Iowa, and J. C. McCabe. Mrs. Scott was well known in Beach and highly esteemed by all for her many sterling qualities, and will be especially missed in the Congregational church of which she was a member.


July 11th, 1919

Only Son of Lyman Page Meets Sad Death
Died In Strange Way While Playing With His Pet Dog

This community was again shocked last Thursday by a terrible mischance that caused the death of Webber Page, the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Lyman Page, well known people of the Golva neighborhood. It appears the little fellow was playing “circus” with his dog having a line attached to the dog and around his own neck in some way and when discovered by his agonized mother, was hanging dead from the reel of a binder near his home. Mrs. Page had seen him playing with the dog but a few moments before, trying to teach the dog some of the tricks the boy had seen at the circus a few days before, but how the line could get over the top of the reel is a mystery, unless the boy and dog had been on the binder and the dog jumping off pulled taut the rope around the boy’s neck and strangled him to death. Webber was a bright boy of 11 years and the idol of his parents, who singularly enough, lost their older son about four years ago through drowning in Bullion creek, a loss neither had recovered from when this second dreadful calamity overtook them. A world of sympathy has gone out to the stricken parents by their many friends and neighbors, the family being well known and esteemed all over the county, Mr. Page having been last year the candidate of the Independents for secretary of state. The funeral was held Friday and the brothers lie side by side in the Beach cemetery.


July 11th, 1919

Power - Bartley Wedding Is Social Event
Popular Young Couple Married Saturday and Leave For Carrington

The marriage of Miss Elizabeth C. Bartley and James E. Power was celebrate at St. John’s church Saturday morning, a large attendance of friends of the popular couple being present. The alter of the church was a mass of flowers and ferns, and as the bridal party entered the church Mendelsohn’s wedding march was played by Miss Margaret Bartley, a sister of the bride, and just before the ceremony Miss Eleanor Wall sang, “Oh, Promise Me.” Preceded by Miss Eleanor Bartley, sister of the bride as bridesmaid, and Frank Power, brother of the groom, as groomsman, the bridal couple proceeded to the altar where Father Hake performed the ceremony, and where the happy couple received the congratulations of relatives and friends. Arranged in the front pews were a large number of the groom’s companions in arms in uniform, former members of Company M, and these, with the uniforms of the groom and his groomsman gave the occasion a distinctive military character. The bride looked charming in white georgette with hat of the same material and carried a large bouquet of pink roses and baby breath fern. As stated, the groom wore the uniform of a sergeant in the United States army, in which he served in this country and France for nearly two years. After the ceremony the bridal party and more intimate friends repaired to the Bartley home where a wedding breakfast, was served, plates being laid for about 40 persons, after which the young couple took the noon train for Carrington, N.D., dozens of friends being on hand with rice and other wedding tokens of good luck and good wishes. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Bartley and has lived in Beach since the family came 11 years ago from Dickinson where she was born. She has been a popular favorite in the younger set of the city and is possessed of many womanly charms that have endeared her to all who know her. The groom is a young man who has resided in Beach for a number of years, having been engaged in the clothing business until the war broke out, when he enlisted in Company M. and as said, did gallant service overseas, being one of the popular and efficient noncommissioned officer of his company. The young couple will reside for the present in Carrington, where Mr. Power will be manager of one of the United Consumers stores.


July 11th, 1919

Word was received Thursday evening of the death of Mrs. Alfred Benson, of paralyses. Interment was made at Baker Saturday. Mrs. Benson has many friends who mourn her loss and the sympathy of the entire community goes out to Mr. Benson in his sad bereavement.


July 11th, 1919

Mrs. I. S. McConkey died Saturday morning of heart failure. Services were held at Carlyle, at the U. B. Church, Sunday afternoon. Brother Borey officiated. Interment was made in the Carlyle cemetery.


July 11th, 1919

Quietly Married at Wibaux

Slipping quietly away to the neighboring town of Wibaux Thur. Glenn Allstot and Miss Emma Wassman, who live in the Golva district, united their fortunes and futures in marriage and then drove gaily back to the home of the groom where from now on life’s journey for them will be along the same trail. The bride was charming in white viole dress and carried red roses, while the groom wore conventional black, only one or two most intimate friends being present at the ceremony. The groom is a prosperous young farmer living near Golva, where he has made many friends, and the bride is a young woman highly esteemed by her neighbors, all of whom will undoubtedly join The Advance in the greatest of good wishes to the happy couple.


July 18th, 1919

Mrs. C. I. Cook’s Mother Dies At The Age of 94

A letter from Capt. C. I. Cook dated July 14th, at Moorcroft, Wyoming states that Mrs. Cook’s mother Mrs. S. D. Wadsworth died that day, her sickness having taken a serious turn a few days before. Mrs. Wadsworth was 94 years old and the remains will be taken to Loahe Mills, Iowa, for burial. The captain says he does not know just when he will start for home. He expects to be back in Beach within a few days.


July 18th, 1919

The young people of Golva and vicinity met in a ban (sic) on Wednesday to serenade Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Bario, who were married at Wibaux that day. Their work proved successful for they were cordially invited and treated to cigars and candy. We are anxiously looking forward to the next charivari.


July 18th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Lorenz have returned from a month’s outing in Minnesota. They primarily went to attend the wedding of Mike Bartley and then visited at the old home and other points. They report a delightful time.


July 25th, 1919

Mrs. and Mrs. G. W. Leonard are the proud parents over the arrival of a boy, George Thatcher, born July 19th.


July 25th, 1919

Died At Dickinson

Mrs. Etta Noll died at the Dickinson hospital July 21, at 10:50 a.m. of cerebral embolism, aged 46. The remains were brought to her home at Burkey, the funeral being held Friday from the Catholic church at that place, interment being made at Burkey, Father Lack officiating. Mrs. Noll leaves a husband and several children, besides a host of friends to mourn her loss, she having been a resident of that district for a number of years, during which time she had come to be very highly esteemed for her many virtues and high character.


July 25th, 1919

Mrs. Mary Schmitz Dead

The many friends of Mrs. Mary Schmitz were pained to hear of her death at her home near Burkey, Tuesday last, at 7:45 p.m. Mrs. Schmitz was 73 years old and the cause of death was acute dilation of the heart. The remains were shipped to Fon du Lac, Wis., Thursday. Mrs. Schmitz was an old resident of the Burke neighborhood and all who knew her respected and highly esteemed her fine womanly character and as a good citizen and splendid neighbor.


August 1st, 1919

M. K. Bowen Killed By E. W. Taylor
Killing Came About Over Attempt of Constable Taylor to Replevin Cattle Owned by D. R. Offley
In Fit of Anger Bowen Got Rifle From Barn and Aimed at Taylor
Mrs. Bowen Opens Fire on Posse

M. K. Bowen, well known farmer living in the southern part of the county, was shot three times and killed Thursday evening, by Constable E. W. Taylor, while the latter was replaying cattle belonging to D. R. Offley, a neighbor of and taken up by Bowen. Taylor surrendered himself to Sheriff Pieraina late last night and he, Constanble J. Stark and George Jeffrey and Offley are now in the county jail awaiting the results of the corner’s inquest.

Mrs. Bowen Shoots Also
A sensational feature of the shooting was the part Mrs. Bowen took in the affair, she having fired at least eight shots at Offley and the constables as soon as the shooting at the barn began, but fortunately missed her marks.

Offley Feared Bowen
To tell a concrete story, it was said that bad blood has been brewing in the Bowen neighborhood for a number of years and fears of bloodshed have often been expressed by the people there. Several days ago Bowen took up some cattle of his neighbor Offley that had got into his pasture, and, according to the story of Offley in the county jail this morning, he feared to go to Bowen’s house to negotiate their return, word having come to him that Bowen had said he, Offley, would never leave the farm alive if he stepped on it, so Offley secured replevin papers and put them in the hands of Constables E. W. Taylor and J. Stark for service, and with George Jeffrey, accompanied them to the Bowen farm last evening.

Taylor’s Story of Shooting
The following occurred at the farm, according to the story of Constable Taylor, and verified by Offley and others: “We met Bowen near his barn,” said Taylor, “and he asked: ‘What are you --,-- doing her?’ I served the papers on him. Bowen said we could have the cattle. Offley asked if the animals had been fed, and Bowen said they had, at which Offley said they did not look like it. Bowen flew into a rage and said: ‘I ain’t going to take any more - - -- off you s----b’s’ and started for the barn.

Bowen Killed While Trying To Kill
“I told him to stay where he was but be continued on, so I caught hold of him and said he mustn’t go into the barn, fearing he had a gun there, but he broke away, rushed into the barn and came out with a repeating gun in his hands, pumping a load into it. I then shot twice as he was raising the gun to shoot, but although both shots struck him in the left side, he was in the act of taking air at me when I fired the shot that killed him, and he dropped in his tracks.

Fusillade of Shots From House
“Just at that moment firing began from another source and we discovered Mrs. Bowen at the house, about 15 rods away, firing at us with a rifle. We all ducked, but she fired at least eight shots, when Constable Stark got the drop on her with his rifle and she put down her gun, which I understand was found empty. I then telephoned the sheriff that I had shot Bowen and asked him to come down to the scene at once, when he did, taking us all into custody pending the coroner’s inquest. The shooting by me was done in self defense, as I was confident Bowen would shoot me if I did not get him first.”

Offley’s Story
D. R. Offley said: “Bowen has tried to get me on his place for a year, and although some of my property was over there, I feared to go after it, having heard he was ‘laying for me,’ but I thought I would be safe if accompanied by the officers. When Mrs. Bowen began to shoot I jumped into a little creek but the bank was so low it gave little protection, and that Mrs. Bowen saw me there was plain from the fact that two or three bullets whizzed over me. When we first drove up Bowen saw a gun sticking out of Taylor’s pocket and said, ‘Don’t come around here showing off your authority to me,’ but I did not think he would attempt to shoot anybody until he came out of the barn with the gun and aimed it at Taylor. About the same time the firing began at the barn Mrs. Bowen opened up from the house and bullets whizzed all around us, and we all sought cover.”

Sheriff and Coroner to Scene
About 10 o’clock last night Sheriff Pierzina, Coroner Rice and Dr. Maercklein drove down to the Bowen home and held an investigation, returning at an early hour this morning with the parties connected with the affair, but Mrs. Bowen, at the time of going to press, had not been taken into custody.

Mrs. Bowen Here
Mrs. Bowen came to town early this morning and talked quite freely with others of the sad affair, but when The Advance asked for an interview in order to publish all sides of the case, a man stepped up and said: “Get out of here. This is my sister, and if you don’t get out I’ll interview you in a way you won’t like,” whereupon Mrs. Bowen said the testimony would be all given at the inquest and that she would rather not be interviewed. She was heard to state elsewhere that she rushed from the house with a sawed off shotgun when the trouble began, but could not work it, so ran into the barn and picked up the rifle used by Mr. Bowen and began shooting in defense of herself and home. It is reported she claims many shots were fired by the posse, but the members thereof deny this, saying the only shots fired on their side were fired by Constable Taylor. The Advance regrets that it cannot publish a statement by Mrs. Bowen from her own lips, as it has no other interest in the case than giving the fact, and facts only, to its readers. The inquest will be held at the Bowen home at 2 p.m. this afternoon.

Was Shot Under Left Arm
According to Coroner Rice the three bullets entered the body of M. K. Bowen within a space of six inches and about the same distance below the left armpit and passed out of the right side in practically the same location. This not only disproves the statement widely circulated in some quarters, that Mr. Bowen had been shot in the back, but tends to prove the statement that Bowen had his arm raised taking air with the gun, as otherwise the bullets would have passed through his arm. M. K. Bowen was about 37 or 38 years of age and his wife is about 31. They have lived on their land a number of years, during which there has been strife and turmoil in the neighborhood, but whether or not Bowen has been responsible for it is not in evidence. He was recognized as one of the leading Socialists of the county and an ardent member of the Nonpartisan League, and in some quarters this fact is being made use of as a reason for the shooting, which does not at all seem justified by the facts.

No Politics In It
The attempt to make a political matter our of this unfortunate affair is to be deplored by all good citizens, whose only desire is to see exact Justice done regardless of their political beliefs, and few knowing the facts, see any direct connection of the shooting with politics.


August 1st, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Rose are the happy . . . over the arrival of an eight pound son, born July 25th.


August 1st, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Joy are the proud parents of a fine new boy, Freeman Robert, who arrived July 26th.


August 8th , 1919

Adolph Attletweed Springs Big Surprise On Friends

Last Monday, Adolph T. Attletweed, cashier of the First National bank, packed his little grip and slipped quietly away to Decorah, Iowa, where he was married Wednesday to Miss Carrie Lomen, one of the popular young ladies of that city and the love of his boyhood. Little is known here of the ceremony beyond the fact that it took place at the home of the bride who is the daughter of O. Lomen, a retired farmer of the Decorah section. The newly weds will visit Detroit Lake and other outing places in Minnesota on the way to Beach and will shortly be at home in the house of the groom on the north side. This quiet performance of Adolph first became known Thursday when a box of cigars appeared on the counter of the First National bank carrying the legend: “Married, July 30, 1919, Adolph.”


August 8th , 1919

W. P. Wallace Died At Daughters Home
Highly Esteemed Octogenarian Passed Away Last Saturday

William P. Wallace, aged 81, died at the home of his daughter, Mrs. E. A. Stoddard, north of town, August 2, of apoplexy. The funeral was held there Tuesday last at 9 a.m., and was largely attended, after which the remains were brought to Beach and shipped to Ontario, Wisconsin, to be laid by the side of his wife. Mr. Wallace was born in Ohio, October 7, 1837, and made his home there until 1882. In 1861 he was united in marriage to Miss Hannah J. James and from this union came five children, four boys and one girl. Mrs. Wallace died in Wisconsin in 1907, and from that time he made his home with his children in North Dakota and Montana. All the children were at the funeral, which was conducted by Rev. L. L. Thayer, of Ontario, Wis., an old friend of the family. In addition to the children: Bert Wallace of Puyallup, Wash., Vinton Wallace of Glendive, J. H. Wallace of Fallon, Mont., Willis Wallace and Meda Stoddard of Beach, the following relatives were present at the funeral: May Vorhies of Glendive, a sister; John Vorhies and wife, nephew and niece; Roy Young and M. O. Wallace, nephews, besides a host of friends from Montana and this county. During the time Mr. Wallace resided in this county he made many warm friends who admired his sterling character and many lovable qualities, and besides the relatives, he leaves many sincere mourners.


August 8th , 1919

Announcements have been received by several Ollie people announcing the marriage of Miss Freda Groh to Mr. William J. Adams, July 22, at Baoz, Wis. Mr. and Mrs. Adams will be at home after August 1st at Stettler, Alberta, Canada, where the groom has a factory. Mrs. Adams will be remembered as having formerly taught in the Ollie high school.


August 15th , 1919

Bonnie View Notes -
The many friends of Mr. Wallace were grieved to hear of his sudden death, which occurred at the home of his daughter, Mrs. E. A. Stoddard, last Saturday, at 11:30 a.m. A funeral service was held Tuesday morning at the Stoddard home, Rev. Thayer of Ollie, officiating. The service was very impressive. Rev. Thayer delivered a very touching sermon, making mention of the presence of the many eastern friends of Mr. Wallace and the reunion that had been brought about. After the service the remains were taken to Beach where a short service was held at the morgue by the Royal Neighbors, of which society Mr. Stoddard was a member. The remains were shipped on No. 2 to Ontario, Wis. for burial. Mr. Wallace leaves four sons and one daughter, besides a host of friends to mourn his loss. He was highly esteemed and respected as a good citizen and splendid neighbor.


August 15th , 1919

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Bob Barnett, Sunday.


August 22nd, 1919

Welch-Haigh Wedding A Brilliant Event Of Week
Pretty Wedding At Church Followed By Sumptuous Nuptial Breakfast

A very pretty wedding occurred at St. John’s Catholic church at 9 o’clock Wednesday morning when Franklin James Welch and Mary Sue Haigh were united in marriage by Father Hake, many friends of the contracting parties being present. The church was tastily decorated in flowers and as the bridal party entered the church Miss Eleanor Bartley played the wedding march, after which the Misses Eleanor Bartley, Eleanor Wall and Margaret Bartley sang in consonance with the joyful occasion. The bride was charmingly attired in a navy blue tricotine traveling suit and bird of paradise feather hat, with corsage bouquet of sweet pears, the groom also wearing traveling clothes as the happy pair were soon to take the train for a bridal trip. The bride and groom were attended by Miss Tessie Haigh and Mr. Roy Haigh, sister and brother of the bride. After the ceremony the party repaired to the home of Miss Lottie Nutter on the North Side, where a delicious wedding breakfast was served, there being plates for 14, after which the bride and groom took train No. 2 for Detroit, Minn., where the honeymoon will be spent. The Nutter home was beautifully decorated in asparagus ferns and flowers, these decorations also being used on the table. The menu served was as follows:
Cherry Cocktail
Fried Spring Chicken, Maryland Style,
Pomme de Terre, a la Creole
Asparagus tips on Toast
Apple Jelly Rolls
Olives
Macedoine Salad
Ice Cream, Florida Style
Bride’s Cake, Groom’s Cake
Café Noir
The bride is one of Beach’s fairest daughters and withal very popular, and has lived here for a number of years. She is the daughter of John H. Haigh, one of the old and well known business men of the valley. The groom is the cashier of the First National bank of Carlyle and recognized as a leader in business circles of that city and most popular in the younger set. There was a great concourse of friends at the depot to see the young couple safely and properly started on their journey, and there was enough rice and old shoes in evidence to feed the birds for many a day and outfit hoboes for years to come, and if all the good wishes come true, this particular young couple will have the happiest and most prosperous career that ever was.


August 22nd, 1919

There Was Revelry On The Banks Of The Beaver

Dr. and Mrs. Museus entertained a jolly house party at their Beaver Creek ranch Saturday evening and night, when fun and good cheer prevailed in large quantities, the occasion being the ninth anniversary of the marriage of the host and hostess. There was music by the Harvey orchestra, a mock marriage of the entertainers, and a number of impromptu stunts that brought the participants close to the daylight hour before beds were sought and the sounds of revelry faded into the murmur of the gentle Beaver as it wends its way through that romantic neighborhood. Those who participated in the festivities, in addition to the nine-year newly weds, were : Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Hayward, Mr. and Mrs. Near, Mr. and Mrs. Reeve and Mrs. M. F. Jones, all of whom returned to the city Sunday.


August 22nd, 1919

Arvid News -
A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Amos Gasho, and a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Hovland, Sunday.


August 29th, 1919

Wm. Raisler Killed While Trying Auto
Boys Fix Up an Old Kirtz Car and Make A Test Run on Saturday Night
Instant Death Meted to Young Man As He is Thrown From the Machine

While out riding with his brothers in an overhauled Ford car, William Raisler, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Raisler, of Thelan, met instant death Saturday night at 9:00 o’clock, on the road leading past D. D. Walde’s farm. It was a car with only a skeleton body. Joe, John and little Elmer were in front, while William and Stanley were in the rear. The road at that place was sideling and sprinkled with a few small rocks, striking one of which caused the car to swerve suddenly, throwing William overboard. Just what happened at this juncture no one will ever know. When the body was picked up it was apparent that death had been instantaneous, the skull having been fractured, the jaw broken and the head severely bruised. Telephone messages were sent the stricken parents and the father hurried to the scene of the tragic death. William Raisler was born in Chicaga (sic), Ill., October 30th, 1896 during the McKinley and Bryan campaign and was named William for McKinley. He came to Golden Valley with his parents over ten years ago and has resided with his father, a prominent Golden Valley farmer, during that time. During his attendance at the public schools he endeared himself to his teachers and schoolmates by his generous and kindly disposition. His death is mourned by his parents, four sisters and six brothers, all living here, the only one absent being Lewis, who was one of the first to enlist in Company M at Beach, and who after closing a most active service of something like a year and a half on the battle fronts of France, is now awaiting his discharge at Camp Lee, Va. With these also mourn the large circle of his acquaintances, with whom he was held in high esteem. A very large concourse of friends were present to pay their last respects to the promising young man at the last sad rites. Short funeral services were held at the house at 10 o’clock on Wednesday morning, then at the Thelan church, Rev. Richter of Sentinel Butte officiating, speaking words of comfort from the words found in Mathew 14-24. He was laid to rest in the Beach cemetery. William will be greatly missed in the community. He was a musician of unusual talent and took an active part in the music and singing at the Thelan church, giving generously of both his time and talent in the work of the church. His passing is a loss to the entire neighborhood, but our loss is his gain. The death is the first break in a family of eleven children and coming at a time when all were joyously anticipating the arrival of the absent brother and son who had manfully taken his chance on the submarine infested ocean and the rain of shot and shell at the battle front it makes the bereavement doubly heavy. The Advance joins with the entire community in extending sympathy to the bereaved family.


August 29th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. George Ortron are the proud parents over the arrival of a baby girl, Bonita Marcelle, born on August 14th.


August 29th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Russell, of Baker are the happy parents over the arrival of a son. Mr. Russell will be remembered as being employed at the bank here a couple of years ago.


August 29th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. T. N. Kirkpatrick autoed to the Charles Kirkpatrick home near Sentinel Butte, Sunday.


August 29th, 1919

Chester Gordon Dies at Bismarck

Chester Gordon, who left here not long ago to work for a transfer company at Bismarck, died in a hospital there while undergoing an operation for appendicitis. While in this vicinity he worked for some time on a farm, after coming to town and assisting his father with the livery and feed barn on the north side. For a while he also served as mail carrier on rural route No. 2. Chester was 22 years of age and was born at Stacyville, Iowa, where he spent his early boyhood days, later moving to Osage, Iowa, then coming to Beach with his parents, where he lived for a number of years. The remains were laid at rest in the Bismarck cemetery last Wednesday afternoon. He is survived by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Gordon, two brothers, Dale and Dermann, and one sister Isabelle.


August 29th, 1919

Born, Friday morning, August 29th, to Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Lovell, a fine baby girl. Both mother and child are doing nicely.


August 29th, 1919

Sentinel Butte News -
The age mother of Mrs. Bertha Mermo, a few miles north of town, died last Sunday at the age of 90 years. The remains were laid to rest in the Sentinel Butte cemetery on Monday. She had resided in this vicinity for several years and was highly respected by all who knew her. All sympathize with the bereaved relatives.


August 29th, 1919

The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Boyd Nauton will be pleased to learn that they are rejoicing over the advent of a little son into their home. Boyd is a former Rocky Butte boy, having settled upon a homestead there with his mother some years since. The Advance joins with a host of friends in extending congratulations.


August 29th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Hoveland are the proud parents of a baby girl.


August 29th, 1919

Norman Waterland Passed Away Sunday
From the Carlyle Herald -
At about noon Sunday, Norman Waterland passed to the Great Beyond at the home of his parents, just southeast of Carlyle. Death was due to leakage of the heart from which he had been in failing health for some considerable time past, but was seriously ill only a few days before death came. Norman was the fifteen-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Waterland, and of thirteen children was the first one to depart this life, leaving his father, mother and twelve brothers and sisters to mourn his loss, besides a host of other relative and friends. Funeral services were held at the home on Monday at 1:30 p.m. and at the U. B. church in Carlyle at 2:30 p.m., interment being made in the Carlyle cemetery. The entire community joins in extending heartfelt sympathy to the sorrowing family in their hour of bereavement.


August 29th, 1919

Born, to Mr. and Mrs. George Dilley, Monday, August 25, a baby girl.


August 29th, 1919

A girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. George Wright, Wednesday, August 27. All are doing nicely.


August 29th, 1919

Born, to Mr. and Mrs. R. F. Gallagher, Thursday, August 28, a fine big boy. All are doing nicely.


August 29th, 1919

All is now well at the Burt home and Harry was passing the cigars with a genial smile Thursday morning as he announced the arrival of a fine baby girl at his home. Two little brothers now have a young sister to whom they will have to pay tribute in the coming years.


August 29th, 1919

Card Of Thanks

We wish to thank the many kind friends who assisted us during this hours of sorrow, in the loss of our beloved son and brother; to those who contributed the beautiful floral offerings, and also to the choir and others assisting in the services. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Raisler and family. Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Raisler Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Wells


September 5th, 1919

Golva News Notes -
Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Sites are the proud parents of a nine pound boy, born on Thursday, August 28th.


September 5th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. T. N. Kirkpatrick and sons Alfred, Earl and Cyrus, are visiting at Jordan, Montana, this week.


September 5th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Osgood received word Monday that Miss Ethel Shelby had died at her home in Mankato, Minn., on August 17th. Ethel was the oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Shelby, who will be remembered as having lived in Ollie about three years ago, and during their short stay here Mr. Shelby was assistant postmaster.


September 5th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Tony Stark are very much pleased over the arrival at their home of a fine baby boy, which arrived Sunday.


September 5th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Mike Finneman are rejoicing over the arrival of a fine baby boy, which came to their home Tuesday.


September 5th, 1919

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Tell Redman, on Wednesday of this week, a boy. Mrs. Redman is at the home of her sister, Mrs. John Brown at present, and is doing nicely.


September 5th, 1919

A fine baby boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. Harry Sites of Golva last week. Mrs. Sites came to this city and took rooms at the Pelky hospital.


September 5th, 1919

John Browski reports the arrival of a baby boy at his home near St. Phillips on Tuesday of last week.


September 5th, 1919

Born the latter part of last week to Mr. and Mrs. A. Nunn, a fine baby girl. Mrs. Nunn came in from the ranch and is stopping at the Halterman home during her illness.


September 12th, 1919

Word has been received that Mrs. Howard Egan, formerly of Golva, died August 31st at the home of relatives in Lake City, Iowa, and was buried September 4th in Streator, Illinois.


September 12th, 1919

A little daughter arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Wells, Thursday, September 4th.


September 12th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Troy Beach are the happy parents over the arrival of a baby girl, Norma Louise, born to them August 31st.


September 12th, 1919

Born to Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Kees, a daughter on September 4th.


September 12th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bellis, of the Ash Coulee country, are the proud parents of a fine boy, born on Monday night.


September 12th, 1919

Clarence Smith and Mrs. Katie Shucho were united in marriage Saturday. The groom is a son of Ed. Smith and the bride has kept the Arvid post office for the past three years. The happy couple will make their home for the present with the groom’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Smith.


September 19th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Pat McDonald are the proud parents of a bouncing baby boy, born on Friday, September 12th. All concerned are doing nicely.


September 19th, 1919

Wyan E. Deal and Ruth Gray were married in Beach, Wednesday afternoon. The groom is a young man from Sentinel Butte who is well known and has many friends who will regret his removal in the very near future. The bride is a young lady of high standing from Boston, Mass., of whom we have received most flattering reports. All join in heartiest congratulations and wish them the best of luck in their future. They expect to leave soon for Kellogg, Idaho, where they will make their home.


September 19th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. R. Z. Leighton are the proud parents of a baby girl, born September 9th.


September 19th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. John Went are rejoicing over the arrival of a son, born to them September 7th.


September 19th, 1919

The home of William Nix was rejoiced Monday night by the arrival of the stork with a bouncing baby girl and the happy father reports the good wife and baby as doing finely - like himself.


September 26th, 1919

Married

Wyan Deal of Sentinel Butte, and Miss Ruth Gray of Boston, Mass., were married at Wibaux, Wednesday, September 17th, by Rev. A. G. Schafer. The happy couple were accompanied to Wibaux by Mrs. Deal and Miss Sylvia Deal of Sentinel Butte, and Mr. Andrew Wike of Glendive was also a witness to the pretty ceremony, and immediately after the wedding the party autoed to the home of Mrs. J. B. Prendergast at Sentinel Butte where a fine wedding dinner was served. The young couple will leave shortly for their future home at Kellogg, Idaho. The groom is well known around Sentinel Butte as a genial and promising young man. He served two years in the navy during the war with credit and the good wishes of all go with him and his charming bride, who has already found a most favorable place in the good will of the community.


October 3rd, 1919

Dan Madison Tells Of Death Of Howard Still In Action
Howard Was Returning From Perilous Mission To Endangered Detachment
Saved The Command From Annihilation But Was Killed In Front Of Dan

Dan Madison stopped off in Beach, Tuesday of last week enroute to San Antonio, Tex., from the Pacific coast, where he had been to visit his mother, to again greet old friends. He is with the U.S. engineer corps, regulars, and will not be discharged for a year or more, but was granted a leave to visit this mother, not having seen her since he enlisted at the first outbreak of the war. Dan saw some very strenuous service in France and was near Howard Still of this county, when the latter received his death wound, and helped carry him from the field to the hospital. Dan says Howard died a hero’s death, having volunteered to carry a message away to the front to order the retirement of a detachment that was in a tight hole and subject to capture through a flank movement of the enemy. Howard had performed the mission that saved the detachment, and was returning to the rear when a shrapnel shell exploded near him, almost cutting him in two, but not killing him instantly. Dan and some other soldiers were near and picked up the dying soldier and took him through a hot fire to the rear. “Tell the folks,” was all that Howard was able to say. Howard was a nephew of J. M. Still. We understand an extension of time of absence has been granted to Dan and he is still with us.


October 3rd, 1919

Interesting News of Ollie Folks -
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hayden are happy parents over the arrival of a son, born September 22nd, at Sidney, Montana.


October 3rd, 1919

Late Sentinel Butte Happenings -
Mrs. W. L. Maxson gave a dinner at her home Thursday evening in honor of her daughter Helen’s 17th birthday. The guest were all high school friends of Miss Helen. Those present were: Misses Amy Stone, Helen Crawford, Jessie Josewski, Jennie Henderson, Johanna Stone, Joy Northrup, Helen Maxson, Messrs. Lyle Josewki, Kenneth Crawford, John Stone, Lloyd Henderson, Walter Dixon, Sewell Mason, Leroy Lundblad, Lewis Maxson and Robert Maxson. The evening was spent in a new and delightful manner of entertainment and singing. Before the guests departed for their several homes Miss Maxson was presented with a beautiful lavelier and gold chain from the high school.


October 3rd, 1919

Late Sentinel Butte Happenings -
Mrs. John Gilertson was suddenly called to McLaughlin, S.D., Friday on account of the death of her father. Mr. Gilertson took her to Baker in the car and she took the Milwaukee train from there, that being the quickest possible route.


October 3rd, 1919

Former Resident Dies

Mr. Charles Rouse of McLaughlin, South Dakota, died at his home on Thursday, September 26th, of heart failure. Mr. Rouse was born at Madison, Wis., July 3rd, 1861, and was married June 3, 1886, at Oakle, Neb., to Miss Etta Mota. He resided at Sentinel Butte eighteen years, having spent his last year at White Sulphur Springs, Mont., and after having visited all his children had settled at McLaughlin for the winter, where his sudden death took place. It was a great shock to all as he has had very good health up to that time. Mr. Rouse leaves a wife and six children to mourn him, as follows: S. W. Rouse, Helena, Mont.; Mrs. Andrew Carlson, Freda, N.D.; Mrs. John Gilbertson, Sentinel Butte, N.D.; Miss Alva Rouse, Helena, Mont., and six grandchildren. Also his father, Rev. Charles Rouse, at DeWitt, Neb., and two brothers and four sisters. The body was brought to Sentinel Butte and the funeral services were held in the Congregational church by Rev. Stein of Beach. The relatives are still visiting at the Gilbertson home. Mrs. Rouse and Miss Alva expect to leave soon for Helena, Mont., where they will make their future home.


October 3rd, 1919

Card Of Thanks

We wish to thank our many friends for the beautiful offerings and the great aid they gave us in our bereavement in the loss of our husband and father. Mrs. John Gilbertson, Mrs. Rouse, Mr. S. W. Rouse, and Miss Alva Rouse


October 3rd, 1919

Married

Z. L. Smith and Marine Alguire left Beach yesterday on No. 1 and were married at Glendive before noon, taking No. 2 from there for Chicago, where they will spend the winter with the groom’s folks. The wedding, while not unexpected, was a general surprise, and details are lacking at this late hour.


October 3rd, 1919

Mrs. John Schell was called east Tuesday upon receipt of the news of the death of her mother.


October 3rd, 1919

The many friends of Mrs. Harry Brastrup gave her a surprise party Tuesday night, it being the occasion of her birthday. A delightful time was enjoyed by all.


October 3rd, 1919

Charles W. McCabe died Tuesday night at the home of his son-in-law, Fred Welch, who lives 14 miles north and west of the city, of chronic heart disease, aged 66 years. He had lived here for some time and was highly respected by all who knew him.


October 3rd, 1919

Ed. Caldwell of Westmore, Montana, has arrived in the city on a very important mission, it being no less than his marriage Saturday to Miss Eleanor Wall, a social event that is being looked forward to with great interest, especially by the younger set.


October 10th, 1919

Arthur Kammerer and Martha Johnson were united in marriage at Wibaux, last Tuesday. They will make their home for the present with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Johnson, of Trotters.


October 10th, 1919

Mrs. John Schell was called to Norwalk, Wis., by the death of her father, who died suddenly there.


October 10th, 1919

Caldwell - Wall Wedding Is Brilliant Affair Of Past Week

The most interesting social event of the past week was the marriage last Saturday at 5 o’clock, of Miss Eleanor M. Wall, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Wall, to Mr. Edward Caldwell, a young business man of Westmore, Mont. This brilliant event took place at the home of the bride and was attended by a number of the friends of the family and contracting parties, who all agree it was a beautiful wedding and that the bride looked charming. The ceremony was held in the parlors of the Wall home, being performed by Rev. Charles H. Caton of the Congregational church. The bride was accompanied by Miss Mary De Merse, her cousin, as maid, and the groom by Raymond Noyes as best man. The bride was becomingly gowned in white georgette with wide lace, and wore a white picture hat with bird of paradise, and carried white and yellow roses. The maid was also gowned in white and wore a picture hat, while the gentlemen wore the conventional black. After the ceremony and the hearty congratulations the guests repaired to the dining room where a magnificent wedding dinner was served, plates being laid for 36. The table was a mass of flowers and the menu was of several courses. The bride and groom left for Glendive, Mont., on No. 7 that evening, and there were the usual farewell scenes at the depot that happen to newly weds, even a number of their friends going with them as far as Wibaux to make sure the passengers on the train knew a bride and groom were among them. After a day or two at Glendive the couple continued on their way to Westmore, Mont., where they will be at home after November 15.


October 17th, 1919

Happy Time In Honor Of Mrs. Loebe’s Birthday

Mrs. George F. Loebe had a birthday Monday and it was such an unusual event, as her sedate husband says, that it had to be celebrated. And it was. A large number of the Loebe friends gathered that evening at the Loebe home and from there proceeded in a body to the Callendar Hotel, where a general jollification started at once, only to be interrupted for a brief spell while a splendid dinner was enjoyed, during which Dr. Foster presided with grace and dignity as toastmaster and Deputy Sheriff Loebe preserved a due sense of decorum on the part of the guests. There were a large number of “whitty and enervating” speeches made by the assembled folks and to say that they had a good time is putting it mildly. But the best was yet to come. After the feast of reason and flow of soul, the tables were removed from the dining room, the music struck up a lively air and away the dancers went on a Marathon lasting far into the night, the one-step, two-step and waltz following each other in rapid succession. It was a joyous occasion, the happy event being in perfect consonance with the joyous nature of the gracious hostess and her no loss amiable spouse, whose ever- bubbling spirits led the others on till dull care was chased away into the brilliance of the coming day.


October 17th, 1919

Doings Of The People Of Golva -
A little daughter arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ray Brier on Sunday, October 5th.


October 17th, 1919

Announcements have been received by several Ollie people announcing the birth of a son to Mr. and Mrs. John Dilley at Eaton, Colo.


October 17th, 1919

Sentinel Butte Happenings -
Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Van Eaton were in town on business Tuesday. Mr. Van Eaton just recently returned from the funeral of his father at Minneapolis. His sister, Mrs. S. Ruggles of Schamat, Mont., also attended the funeral and is now making a short stay at the C. H. Van Eaton home.


October 17th, 1919

North Fork Items -
Mrs. Sivesind and daughter Mildred, Mr. Latterell and daughter Gertrude autoed down to the Johnston home near Golva, Wednesday evening to a wedding shower given on Mr. and Mrs. Henry Johnston, Jr., who were married last Wednesday.


October 17th, 1919

Doyle - Mollard Wedding

Slipping quietly away to Wibaux, Friday, October 3, J. C. Doyle, local manager of the electric light company, and Miss Bertha Mollard of this city, sprung a surprise on their friends by getting married by Justice Berry and returning to the city just as though a great event had not happened. But the affair could not always be kept a secret, and the many friends of the couple are by ones and twos tendering their congratulations. Both the contracting parties are well and favorably known in this section, and the Wibaux event was not unexpected. The work of getting the electric light lines and plant in good shape for the winter precludes an “official” honeymoon just now, but Manager Doyle says he has a month next summer marked off on the calendar, when the event of two weeks ago will be celebrated in proper shape with a trip and a good time.


October 17th, 1919

Marriage of Wm. McLaughlin and Lea Ackley

A week ago Tuesday last, at 9 a.m. a quiet little wedding occurred at the Catholic church in this city, so quiet that it has only now become generally known. This happy event was when Father Hake united in marriage William McLaughlin of Beach, and Miss Lea Ackley, daughter of Mrs. E. C. Bailey, living north of Sentinel Butte. The bride and groom were attended by the groom’s brother, Robert McLaughlin, and Miss Louisa Zook, the immediate members of the family also being present. After the ceremony the bridal party took autos and proceeded to the former home of the bride, where a fine wedding dinner was enjoyed and the balance of the day was spent in celebrating the happy event. After a week spent at the farm the bride and groom returned to the city and have taken up their residence at the home of the groom. Mr. McLauglin is well known in this county, being a prominent young business man and his bride is a charming lady whose friends are legion.


October 17th, 1919

Bruere - Runk Wedding

There was a quiet little wedding in the office of Judge Smith, Wednesday, October 8, which has just come to light, the main parties to the event having been, until now, too busy with their honeymoon to even tell their friends about the march they stole on them. On the date mentioned Judge Smith, in his best style, united in marriage, Charles Bruere and Mrs. J. N. Runk, and the couple at once took thetrain for Miles City, where they spent a week, returning here to prepare for their departure to a ranch in the neighborhood of Gopher, Mont., where Mr. Bruere is working, and where they will make their future home. The bride has been a resident of this county for the past nine years, having lived until now about nine miles southeast of Beach, and has a large circle of friends in that neighborhood and in the city, who will wish her all the happiness in the world. As stated, the groom is a rancher and is spoken well of by those who know him. They left for the Montana ranch last Saturday.


October 17th, 1919

Mrs. H. J. Wall is spending a week with the newly wed, Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell, at their home in Westmore, Montana.


October 17th, 1919

Miss Cora Paulson went to Minneapolis, Wednesday to be present Saturday at the wedding of her sister, Miss Frances, to Arthur J. Morrell of Virginia, Minn.


October 24th, 1919

Arvid -
The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Hovland passed away Wednesday from whooping cough, at the age of nine weeks. They have the sympathy of the entire community.


October 24th, 1919

Interesting News of Ollie Folks -
Sixteen of the young ladies motored out to the home of Ed Wang, Thursday evening, and pleasantly surprised Miss Laura, the occasion being her birthday. She was presented with a box of stationery and a pretty cut glass dish. The guests departed at a late hour wishing Miss Laura many more happy birthdays.


October 24th, 1919

Wedding Bells

Earl W. Stark and Florence H. Abrams stole a march on their many friends Saturday when they slipped off to Baker and were quietly married by the justice of the peace. The groom is the youngest son of Mrs. Cynthia Stark. He is a man of good habits and is one of our thriving young farmers. The bride is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Williams Abrams, and is very popular. They will make their home with the groom’s mother on her farm south of town. The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Stark join in extending hearty congratulations and wishing them a long life of wedded bliss.


October 24th, 1919

Leo Neubeiser Dies At St Paul Hospital

Escaping injury in every form on every battlefield on which American troops had fought in France, Leo Neubeiser met death last week at St. Paul from blood poisoning. While working as a plumber at Belle Plaine, Minn., Leo struck his head against a nail, making a painful would from which blood poisoning set in, resulting in death at a St. Paul hospital, to which he was taken, as stated. Leo Neubeiser went into the war as a member of Company M of Beach, upon arriving in France was transferred to the famous First division, which participated in all the hardest battles of the war. Upon his return to America he located in Belle Plaine, the place of his birth, and entered into partnership with his father and brother in the plumbing and heating business. He was a member of the American Legion and Knights of Columbus, both of which bodies turned out en masse to his funeral. Leo’s many friends in Beach will read this news with sadness, for while a resident of this city he had won a high place for himself in the estimation of all who knew him.


October 24th, 1919

Miss Marjorie Miller celebrated her ninth birthday Saturday with a party to nine friends, when games and all kinds of good times were had, concluding with refreshments dear to the palates of folk of that ripe age.


October 31st, 1919

Julius Roeslar received the sad news Thursday that his mother had suddenly passed away at Eau Clair, Wis. On account of conditions here Mr. Roeslar was unable to attend the funeral, but Mrs. Roeslar made hasty preparations and left on No. 2 for Wisconsin.


October 31st, 1919

Wednesday, October 22nd, a surprise party was given in honor of the 17th birthday of Miss Jessie Josewski. The evening was spent in playing games, after which a delicious lunch was served, consisting of cocoa, chicken sandwiches, scalloped potatoes, apple salad, two kinds of cake, etc. Among her many gifts was a beautiful signet ring which was presented by the entire party, consisting of: Mr. and Mrs. Emery, Miss Phillips, Miss Lyken, Miss McDonald, Miss Avery, Miss Hoag, Joe Lundblad, Roy Lundblad, Lloyd Henderson, Jennie Henderson, Amy Stone, John Stone, Helen Maxson, Bob Maxson, Grace Stoddard, Mrs. Stoddard, Lyle Josewski, Mr. and Mrs. Josewski. Mrs. J. B Stoddard and Mrs. Josewski served refreshments, after which the evening was spent in mirth and laughter and all had the “time of their lives”.


October 31st, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Tobias are back from their honeymoon on their brother-in- law’s ranch north of Medora.


October 31st, 1919

Ryan Briedenfeldt and Olga Junke, accompanied by Miss Mary Sartz and Rhue Wilson, as bridesmaid and best man, went to Glendive, Wednesday afternoon and were married.


October 31st, 1919

J. R. Waters, manager of the Bank of North Dakota, has exchanged his title of “Major” for one of which he is much prouder - ‘Grandfather.’ The occasion for this new dignity is a daughter born to Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Dursema of Bismarck, at a Fargo hospital. Mrs. Dursema was Miss Angeline Waters. Mrs. Waters is in Fargo with her daughter and granddaughter.


October 31st, 1919

Interesting News of Ollie Folks -
Mrs. A. W. Lewis received the sad news of her father’s death at Harlan, Ia., Tuesday evening. Mr. and Mrs. Lewis left Wednesday for that place. Dr. E. J. Smith has made several visits to Ollie and is well known around here. His death comes as a shock to his many friends. The bereaved daughter has the sympathy of the entire community.


October 31st, 1919

Interesting News of Ollie Folks -
Edgar Blue of Golva, and Olena Helland of Baker, were united in marriage Wednesday, October 22nd, by Rev. Livingston, at Baker, Mont. Edgar is a brother of Dallas Blue of this city and is well known around here. Mr. and Mrs. Blue will visit at the W. E. Blue home for some time before making their home at Sioux Falls, S.D., where the groom is working for the Overland people. Our congratulations and best wishes go with them.


November 7th, 1919

Doings of People of Golva -
A very pretty home wedding was solemnized at the home of Mrs. May Walters in Golva, on Sunday, October 26th, at 1 p.m., when Miss June Stout, a sister of Mrs. Walter’s, became the bride of Wendeyy (sic) Phillips, the Golva baber (sic). The bride was becomingly attired in tan Georgette crepe and was attended by Miss Ella Timm, who wore a very pretty gown of apriot silk chiffon. The groom wore the conventional blue serge and was attended by Clinton Stout, a brother of the bride. Following the ceremony, which was performed by Rev. Smeltzer of Beach, Mrs. Walter served a sumptuous dinner to the bridal party and immediate relatives. A wedding dance was given by the groom on Monday, October 27th, in the town hall at Golva. A large number of people from Golva and vicinity were present. Mr. and Mrs. Phillips expect to leave in a short time for Seattle, Wash., where they will spend the winter and possibly make their future home. Both bride and groom are well known in Golva and vicinity and during the residence here have made a host of friends who join in wishing them all the happiness in the world and a long life in which to enjoy it.


November 7th, 1919

Doings of the People of Golva -
A little son arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Krueger on October 26th.


November 7th, 1919

Obituary

The news of the death of James McGrath, a well known and popular farmer of this country, came too late last week for The Advance to make more than a mention of his death. Mr. McGrath died October 22nd, from a stroke of paralysis. He would have been 57 years old December 14 next. He was born in McHenry county, Illinois, where he spent his younger days, and from there moved to Sioux Falls, S.D., leaving there to settle here in 1906, on a farm one mile east of Saddle Butte. He leaves a sister here, Miss Nellie McGrath, a sister, Miss Elizabeth McGrath of Waterloo, Iowa, and a brother, Thomas, at Solomon, Kansas. The funeral services were held at the Catholic church in this city, October 25th, all the relatives and a host of friends being present. In the years that Mr. McGrath resided here his sterling character endeared him to many friends, and there is general regret at the taking away in his prime of so good a neighbor and citizen. The family united in expressing to the many good friends appreciation of their kindness and consideration during the sickness and last rites of deceased, such services being a great amelioration of the overpowering grief of such a time.


November 7th, 1919

Married

October 25, John W. Myers and Grace B. Myers, both of Beach, were married by County Judge T. L. Smith, the witnesses being Miles Bartle and Clerk of Court F. E. Heath. This is the culmination of a romance begun a number of years ago, and running through the divorce court, the gallant service of the groom in oversea service for his country, and happy reunion upon his return.


November 7th, 1919

Word has reached the city that Clayton M. Borst, formerly Western Union manager here, died in Minnesota last week. He was a Philippine veteran and for years has suffered from a sword wound received “over there.” His many friends here are sorry to get the bad news.


November 14th, 1919

Doings of the People of Golva - Ed. Fischer returned on Wednesday from Randall, Minn., where he spent the past several weeks and no one, it seems, was greatly surprised that he did not return alone, but was accompanied by a “brand new wife.” The wedding occurred at Randall, October 28th, at the home of the bride, and we have thus far been unable to learn any particulars thereof. The bride, formerly Miss Theda Kempenick, is well known in this vicinity, having recently spent several months here at the home of her sister, Mrs. F. K. Randash, who lives east of town. The happy couple will make their home in Golva, where Mr. Fischer is at present running the garage. The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Fischer join in wishing them a happy and prosperous married life.


November 14th, 1919

Mrs. Julius Roselar returned Saturday morning from Wisconsin, where she visited relatives and attended the funeral of Mr. Roeslar’s mother.


November 14th, 1919

Interesting News of Ollie Folks -
Stanley Brady celebrated his seventh birthday Thursday by inviting the following little boys in to spend the afternoon: Donald Solum, Allen Higgins, Vernon West, Clayton Campbell, Elmer Rost, Voile and Carlyle Morris, Jack and Harry Messmer, Ingoff Sherva and Ernest Stark. The afternoon was spent in playing games, after which a delicious lunch was served by Mrs. Brady, Mrs. T. M. Solum assisting.


November 14th, 1919

Cook - Eckel

The marriage of Earl L. Cook, of Carlyle, and Cecelia Eckel, of New York city, was solemnized at the Methodist parsonage at Baker, on Friday, October 31st, Rev. Chappel officiating. Mr. and Mrs. Cook will be at home to their many friends on the Carlock homestead, three and one-half miles southwest of Carlyle. The groom is a prosperous young farmer, who with his bride have the best wishes of their host of friends for their future happiness.


November 14th, 1919

Irene Carver celebrated her 12th birthday on the 12th with a party to her young friends that was most enjoyable.


November 21st, 1919

Mayor M. Mathison received word Tuesday that his sister, Miss Hilda Mathison, had died Friday at Albert Lea, Minnesota, of appendicitis. The funeral will be held at Gardner, N.D., the old home of deceased, on Thursday and Mr. Mathison went down Wednesday to attend it. Miss Mathison was a teacher in the Albert Lea schools and many in Beach knew her, as she spent the Christmas season with her brother and Mrs. Mathison a couple of years ago. The many friends of the mayor will grieve with him in his loss.


November 21st, 1919

Doings of the People of Golva -
A little daughter arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Oliver White, on Saturday, November 8th.


November 21st, 1919

Doings of the People of Golva -
A pair of twins were born to Mr. and Mrs. John Zimmer on Tuesday, November 11th. One of the children died the following day, but the other is doing nicely.


November 21st, 1919

Chas. Kenyon Tries To Kill Luther Wells Then Suicides
Shooting Was Outcome of Long Standing Feud Between Neighbors
After Wounding Wells, and Thinking Him Dead, Kenyon Killed Himself

Last Friday morning as a result of a personal feud between two farmers of Wibaux county, Charles Kenyon shot and wounded Luther B. Wells in the hip and later committed suicide by shooting himself through the head. Wells was not dangerously wounded and was at once brought to Wibaux, and is rapidly recovering. As near as can be gleaned there had been a lack of good will between Wells and Kenyon for a long time, but they had kept away from each other. Friday, Wells was at the farm home of Wilson Grant when Kenyon came up, armed with a rifle. Grant went out and talked with him a short distance from the house, when Wells, who had borrowed Wilson’s rifle, also left the house and went toward his team rather prominently carrying the gun, and got into his rig. Kenyon then opened fire on Wells who returned it, but at the second or third shot Kenyon received a bullet in the lower part of the body. Wells, running out of ammunition, and notwithstanding his wound, ran to the granary, Kenyon keeping up a steady fire. Wells then sought shelter in the cow barn, where he fell exhausted from his wound. Archie Grant went into the barn, and coming out told Kenyon he had killed Wells and had better give himself up, and Kenyon mounted his horse and rode over to the home of Archie Quaale. In the meantime the authorities at Wibaux had been notified and the sheriff and deputies went out to the scene of the shooting and to Kenyon’s home, but in some way, in the darkness Kenyon evaded the officers, and going into his cow barn, shot himself through the head, being found there by the sheriff upon hearing the shot. Kenyon has been in ill health for some time and this, with the brooding over the trouble with Wells is thought to be the basis of the crime, for there is every evidence that the killing was to a large extent premeditated. Kenyon having recently deeded everything he owned to his wife. He was buried at Wibaux, the funeral being from the M. E. church, Monday. He came to Wibaux county several years ago from Illinois, and was always considered a peaceable man. Mrs. Kenyon was at the Quaale home when Kenyon arrived and he told her of the shooting, he then being under the impression he had killed Wells. He kissed his wife good bye before leaving Quaale’s and saying he never would be taken alive, told her to take good care of money he had left her. Mrs. Kenyon is prostrated over the sad affair.


November 28th, 1919

Romance Of Youth Ends In Glendive Wedding

The culmination of a boy and girl romance came last Monday when Raymond Noyes and Mary De Merse were united in marriage at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Max Baller, old friends, at Glendive, just as the clocks were striking one p.m. The bride and groom then took the train for Westmore to spend the honeymoon with Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Caldwell. They expect to return to the city next Monday. Mr. and Mrs. Walter Noyes and Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Greiner accompanied the prospective bride and groom to Glendive and witnessed the ceremony, but most others of the many friends of the young couple knew nothing of the event until the boys were invited to smoke a “Stub.”


November 28th, 1919

Wednesday evening after the Firemen’s dance, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Brastrup gave a supper to a few friends in honor of the fourth anniversary of their marriage, which was a delightful affair in every way.


November 28th, 1919

The home of Gerhard Fischer, who lives east of Golva, was blessed on the 20th with a fine baby boy, and there is great rejoicing the event in that domicile.


November 28th, 1919

Last Saturday the stork left a fine baby boy at the home of H. J. Johnston, south of town, and the proud papa declares he is a bird for sure.


December 5th, 1919

Claude Vertz Killed In Carlyle Coal Mine

Claude Vertz, a farmer living near Carlyle, was killed Friday afternoon by a cave- in of a coal mine located three miles north of Carlyle, and three other miners had a narrow escape from death, they being caught in the fall of earth, but managed to dig themselves out. Vertz leaves a wife and five children. From what information could be gleaned it appears the miners neglected to timber up the mine properly as they took out the coal and finally the cave-in occurred.


December 5th, 1919

Sentinel Butte News -
Saturday evening, November 22nd, a party was given at the opera house in honor of the 15th birthday of Grace Stoddard. The evening was spent in playing games and later in dancing. The dancing especially was the subject of much discussion concerning a certain party who “stepped out” in the realms of society. His entertainment as well as the others consisted of games and dancing. Well, you’ll have to ask him about the rest.


December 5th, 1919

Interesting News of Ollie Folks -
Clifford Cousin of Miles City, and Mrs. Agness Bloom were quietly married at Wibaux, Wednesday. They are making their home at the present on the bride’s farm, one-half mile north of Carlyle. Their many friends extend congratulations and wish the newlyweds happiness in their wedded life.


December 5th, 1919

Interesting News of Ollie Folks -
While Claud Virts (sic) was mining coal on his land, about three miles north of Carlyle, Friday afternoon, the mine caved in, Killing him and injuring a couple of other men. Mr. Virts (sic) leaves a wife and five children, who have the deepest sympathy of the entire community in the loss of their husband and father.


December 12th, 1919

Romance Of Prairie Ends In Marriage

A simple wedding at the parsonage of St. Paul’s Lutheran church Wednesday morning at 11 o’clock, brought a romance of the prairie to culmination and united in marriage Paul Wischow and Julia Carlson, both of the Sentinel Butte neighborhood. In addition to the principals to this wedding Miss Sophia Carlson, a sister of the bride, and Leslie Premo stood up with the happy couple, these together with the Rev. II. J. Trinklein, being the only witnesses of the pretty ring ceremony. The bride was becomingly attired in light tan crepe duchene and carried flowers, the groom being in the usual black. After the ceremony the bridal party repaired to the home of the bride, where a fine wedding dinner was served and the balance of the day given over to celebration of the happy event. The groom is a prosperous young farmer living two miles north of Sentinel Butte, and the bride is the daughter of Mrs. Betty Carlson, whose farm is four miles south of Sentinel Butte. Both the young people are popular in their neighborhoods and the good wishes of hosts of friends, in which The Advance joins, follow them to the groom’s farm, where life has been started in partnership.


December 12th, 1919

Born

To Mr. and Mrs. Sigmund Bachmeier, December 3, a fine baby girl. To Mr. and Mrs. William Odenbaugh, December 3, a big boy.


December 12th, 1919

Mrs. Chadderdon Died Suddenly Wednesday

Margaret Estella, wife of C. E. Chadderdon, of this city, died suddenly Wednesday morning at 10:15 o’clock, at her home in this city, of heart failure, a malady with which she had suffered for some months. She was in bed at the time the dread summons came and talking with the maid, when she said: “I feel so funny,” and then collapsed, and was dead when a physician reached the house. The funeral will be held Saturday morning from the Methodist church at 11 o’clock. Mrs. Chadderdon was 46 years old at the time of her death, having been born at Northwood, Minn., August 21, 1872, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Smith, well known residents of that city. In addition to her husband, she leaves three children, Loren, Geraldine and Hamilton, to mourn her death, and the entire community joins in sympathy in their loss. Mrs. Chadderdon was a great home mother, devoting herself largely to the care of her children. A woman of splendid character and many lovable traits, she won many friends here who will miss her kindly hospitality.


December 12th, 1919

Late Sentinel Butte Happenings -
Mr. and Mrs. Klein are the proud parents of a darling baby girl, born December 6th. All concerned are doing nicely.


December 12th, 1919

Late Sentinel Butte Happenings -
Miss Julia Carlson and Mr. Paul Wischow were united in the holy bonds of matrimony at Beach, by the Lutheran minister of that place, Wednesday. Miss Carlson is a prominent young lady of Sentinel Butte who has lived here several years and attends high school. She is a fortunate young lady in having many friends, both while in school and in every day life. Mr. Wischow is a prominent young farmer living about five miles north of Sentinel Butte. All join in congratulating the happy young couple and wish them the greatest success in life.


December 12th, 1919

Interesting News of Ollie Folks -
About sixteen of the young people gathered at the R. O. Wood home Tuesday evening, and pleasantly surprised Miss Gladys Gift, the occasion being her birthday. Games were played until the wee hours of the morning. Miss Gladys was presented with a large box of candy, after which refreshments were served. All report the “best time ever.”


December 12th, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Campbell are the proud and happy parents over the arrival of another son, “Earle Edward,” born December 5th. One can hardly say which is the more elated over the event, “big” or “little” Cam.


December 19th, 1919

Late Sentinel Butte Happenings -
Mrs. J. A. Peterson, whose husband was employed by the Saddlery here last summer, died on December 2nd, at Seattle, Wash., according to word recently received.


December 19th, 1919

Interesting News of Ollie Folks -
Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Glen Stark, a baby girl, December 10th.


December 19th, 1919

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Weinreis was blessed early Wednesday morning by a second visit of the stork, which brought along a fine girl No. 2, and Joseph is having a fit over the performance, but like all fathers, will recover after a while. Mother and child are doing fine and Christmas will be the merrier at that home because of this little “incident.”


December 26th, 1919

Tony Belmont is celebrating the arrival at his home last Sunday of a fine girl, the first child having been a boy. This makes a fine team, as Tony says, and everybody is doing well under the circumstances.


December 26th, 1919

Dr. Niece Was Married At Wibaux On Tuesday
Knot Tied as the Sun Peeks O’er the Horizon - Honeymooning

Dr. O. R. Niece stole a march on his many friends Tuesday morning by stealing up to Wibaux and in the early dawn taking to himself a bride in the person of Miss Mary A. Miller, the ceremony being performed at the house of Father Cieslewicz at 6 a.m., after which the happy couple fled east on belated No. 4 to spend the honeymoon. Miss Miller was for some time a teacher in the Wibaux schools but of late has been one of the efficient force of the Mercantile Company’s store. She is quite well known in Beach and will receive a hearty welcome when she takes up her residence here. She is very popular wherever known and is altogether charming, which accounts for the doctor’s numerous trips westward during the past year. No introduction is needed to Dr. Niece, he being one of the popular dentists of this city and withal a prince of good fellows, but the “boys” will never forgive the march he stole on them, and there will be something doing when he returns. r winters in Long Beach, Cal., and their summers, in Beach, N. D. His death came soon after Mrs. Moulton’s, who passed away in Long Beach Oct. 1. He was apparently in fine spirits that afternoon but after having his supper, laid down for a short nap and passed away without awaking, January 16th, 1918, at about 10:30 p.m.
Claude H. Moulton, only son, left Thursday on No. 3 arriving for the funeral, which was held Monday at 10:00 a.m. at Long Beach, in charge of the Long Beach Post, Grand Army of the Republic.



Copyright 2006 Larry Fitzgerald