BIRTH, MARRIAGES, DEATHS FROM
The Beach Advance
1918



January 9th, 1918

Cupid Active This Week
Last Monday at 4:30 pm at the home of J. W. Hubble, was solemnized the wedding of Russell A. Hubble, son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Hubble of Beach, and Miss Frieda Eva Fingel, of Occona, Wisconsin.
The marriage ceremony was performed by Rev. William R. Thatcher, of the M. E. church. Only the immediate family and close friends were in attendance. Following the wedding a sumptuous wedding banquet was partaken of at the Hubble home in their honor.

Growers - Johnstone Nuptials
James Gowers and Miss Muriel Johnstone, both old time residents of Golden Valley residing near Golva were quietly married at Wibaux, Montana, Monday evening. They will make their home on the Gowers farm near Golva.

Cupid Spears Another
John F. Holland and Victoria Proderjy, of Baker, were married Monday evening at Wibaux. Following the ceremony they returned to the home of the groom’s parents north of Beach where they will remain for a few days when they will move to the Wm Holland farm near Trotters.


January 9th, 1918

Word was received here late Thursday of the death of G. B. Moulton, which occurred Wednesday, Jan. 16. Mr. Moulton did extensive farming northwest of Beach for about six years, retiring last October. He moved to Long Beach, Cal. after leaving the farm and has lived there since leaving Beach. C. H. Moulton, son of the deceased left on No. 3 for Long Beach and will attend the funeral. Mrs. L. J. Alguire of this place is a daughter of the late Mr. Moulton. At the time of going to press we have heard nothing of the funeral arrangements.


January 9th, 1918

Local Printer Weds Popular Golva Miss

On Wednesday, Jan. 16, at 10:00 a.m. occurred the marriage of Miss Lois Curl, and Joseph L. Dilley. Both of the young people are well known in and around Beach, the lady being the daughter of Commissioner L. E. and Mrs. Curl of Golva. Mr. Dilley is a well-known printer and linotype operator, and has been employed in Beach and neighboring towns since he came to this place from Minnesota about eight years ago. At present he is employed as foreman in the Advance office. For the past two years Mrs. Dilley has held a position as clerk in the Golden Rule store at this place, and her quiet lady-like ways have won her a place of high esteem from all who know her. The ceremony occurred at the Congregational church, the Rev. A. R. Bosworth pronouncing the words that made the happy couple one. The bride was beautifully attired in gray taffeta and the groom in the conventional blue. The happy twain left on No. 2 Wednesday for a short trip at which time they will visit Mr. Dilley’s parents at Princeton, Minnesota. They will be at home to their friends in Beach after February 1st. A host of friends wish the newly married couple a world of success and happiness through the years that will come and the Advance wishes, during their absence to be included among their well-wishers. May all that is good be theirs.


January 23rd, 1918

Another Printer Becomes Benedict
Publisher of Golden Valley Progress Weds Miss Grace M. S. Zook of This City

At 9 a.m. on Thursday, January 22nd occurred the marriage of Miss Grace M. S. Zook and Editor Ray R. Richards, both of this city. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Father Wolphers at the Catholic church and the couple were attended by Napoleon Richards, brother of the groom and Miss Pauline Zook, sister of the bride. The bride is an estimable young lady, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Zook of near Beach and is well known to the people of the city. Mr. Richards is too well known to need introduction, having been connected with the Golden Valley Progress as business manager for the past four years. Mr. Richards has recently acquired full ownership of the Progress and is now both editor and publisher of that worthy publication.
The bride was arrayed in taffeta and the groom wore the conventional blue. A sumptuous wedding supper was served at the home of Mrs. V. Richards, mother of the groom.
Owing to the scarcity of help, Mr. Richards is compelled to delay his wedding trip until a later date. The couple are now at home to their many friends at the Richards home.
The Advance is desirous of being included among the well wishers of the newly weds.


January 30th, 1918

Obituary

Guerdon B. Moulton was born at Pawauke, Waukesha Co., Wisconsin on September 1st, 1844, worked on the farm of his father until the out break of the Civil war when he enlisted in Co. I, First Wisconsin Calvary and saw service under General Thomas at Nashville and Chickamauga, besides numerous raids and skirmishes under the command of Gen. Wilson. After the close of the war he returned to Wisconsin and there he married Mary E. Kipp, at Eagle, Wis., Feb. 22, 1866.
He came to Sioux Falls, S.D. in 1873 where he took up land and resided until 1908, when the family moved to Beach, N.D.
Mr. Moulton was heavily interested in land at this place but the past few years had taken no active part in the management of his farms. Mr. and Mrs. Moulton spent their winters in Long Beach, Cal., and their summers, in Beach, N. D. His death came soon after Mrs. Moulton’s, who passed away in Long Beach Oct. 1. He was apparently in fine spirits that afternoon but after having his supper, laid down for a short nap and passed away without awaking, January 16th, 1918, at about 10:30 p.m.
Claude H. Moulton, only son, left Thursday on No. 3 arriving for the funeral, which was held Monday at 10:00 a.m. at Long Beach, in charge of the Long Beach Post, Grand Army of the Republic.


February 6th, 1918

A marriage license was issued last week to Anton Kreitinger and Miss Lillian Cross, both of Golva.


February 13th, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Baker of west of Beach are the proud parents of a baby girl, born to them last Friday.


February 13th, 1918

Tony Krieitinger Takes Wife

At 9:30 a.m. on Tuesday of this week at the Catholic church at Burkey occurred the marriage of Anton Kreitinger and Miss Lillian Cross. Rev. Father Lack performing the ceremony. Only the immediate relatives and friends were in attendance.
Miss Frances Noll and Theodore Kreitinger were the witnesses. The bride is a very estimable young lady, well-known and highly respected in this community.
The groom is a popular young business man of Golva, the proprietor of the Golva Motor Inn, which he has been conducting for the past few years. Following the ceremony a sumptuous wedding breakfast was served at the home of the bride’s mother, Mrs. Cross of Burkey.
Mr. and Mrs. Kreitinger left Beach on No. 3 Tuesday for Miles City on a short honeymoon, after which they will be at home to their friends at Golva. The Advance wishes to join with their many friends in wishing the newly-weds a happy and prosperous voyage on the sea of matrimony.


February 13th, 1918

Obituary

Mrs. Guy Whitaker died at her home in the city of Beach, Friday morning, February 8, from an acute attack of Brights Disease, six hours after the demise of her infant child.
Mrs. Whitaker, nee Clark, was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Clark, of this city. She was married to Guy Whitaker in 1912 and since that time they have made their home in and around Beach, and have been residing on a farm four miles northeast of this city.
Dr. Bowen of Dickinson was called in consultation with local physicians and at that time no hopes were entertained for her recovery.
The death of the young wife and mother is an unusually sad event in the fact that besides a husband, parents, brothers and sister, she leaves to mourn her loss three small children, Doris aged 5; Gerald age 3 years and Walter 2 years. Funeral Services for the mother and child were held Sunday, February 10 at the Methodist church and Rev. W. R. Thatcher officiating, and interment made in the Beach cemetery. The bereaved husband, children and relatives have the deepest sympathy of the community in this sad hour of their bereavement.


February 22nd, 1918

Beach Boy Dies In France
Harley Salzman, member of Co. M of Beach Succumbs to Pneumonia after Lingering Illness - - - First Death in Co. M

The sad news of the death of Harley Salzman reached here yesterday, which occurred “somewhere in France” on January 25th. His parents, who are now visiting in Illinois heard of his death three weeks later. We reprint below an item from the Bloomington, (Ill.) Pantagraph giving all the particulars available: “E. E. Salzman, formerly a resident of this city and well known here, but now a resident of Beach, North Dakota, visiting with Jon W. Enlow, west of town, has received a letter from France stating that his son has died there in the service of the country. The news comes in a letter from Ernest G. Hatch, a comrade of the boy who died, who knew the father and wrote to him the news.
The letter which bore the sad news was written three weeks ago. It stated that Harley Salzman had been sick while at Camp Mills, Long Island, before starting across, that he had never regained his strength and when he had faced more exposure, was placed in a hospital where he was given every care they could provide. But his strength was not sufficient and he died on January 25. The father and mother had not received as yet any word from the government about the death. Some of the pages of the letter were torn out by the censor so that a complete story of the last days of the boy could not be learned.
Harley Salzman lived in Carlock, Ill., until the age of nine years when he went to Beach, N.D., with his parents, which place has been his home ever since. Last July he enlisted in the National Guard, Company M, of the 2nd Reg. In October he was sent to Camp Greene, Charlotte, North Carolina, where the regiment was broken up and he was put in the 164th ambulance train company, 166ar sanitary train 41st division of the Expeditionary forces. He was sent to Camp Mills on Long Island where he first contracted his illness and where he embarked. He arrived in France about the first of the year.
Mr. and Mrs. Salzman had received only one letter from the lad and that simply stated that he had arrived safely in France.


February 22nd, 1918

Ralph Kranick Dead

On February 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the Stoddard ranch near Sentinel Butte occurred the death of Ralph Kranick, after a short illness of about a week. Death being due to pneumonia.
On January 26th Ralph Kranick came to Beach to fill out his questionnaire and on his way here caught cold and also froze his face. On reaching home again he was taken sick with the grip which later developed into pneumonia, resulting in his death. Ralph Kranick was born at Pelican Rapids, Minn., Sept. 8, 1891. His mother, Viola L. Kranick died when he was yet a child 2 years old. He came to the Golden Valley with his father, Thos. Kranick in 1903 and has resided near Beach since that time until 1913 when he filed on a homestead near Edgehill, Mont., proving up on the land last December. Since July 1915 he has been a valued and trusted employee at the Stoddard ranch.
He was a true blue American, had just recently been examined and placed in Class 1 and was waiting to be called to serve. His dying words were, “Oh, if I could only get well so I could fight for Uncle Sam.”
He was at the time of his death but 27 years of age.
He leaves to mourn his sudden demise his father, Thos. Kranick, and two sisters, Mrs. William Zabel, and Mrs. S.E. Wise, all of whom were present at the obsequies. His brother Harry, having died two years previous to the day he was taken sick. The funeral services were held at the M.E. church last Monday, Rev. Ira Hawley preaching a very impressive sermon. Interment was made in the Beach cemetery. The heartfelt sympathy of the entire community is extended to the sorrowing relatives in their hour of bereavement.


March 1st, 1918

Beach Couple Marry
Well Known Golden Valley Farmer Married at Wibaux Last Sunday

The many friends of Alvin W. Bartheld and Miss Gwendolyn V. Wallace will be both surprised and glad to hear of their marriage which occurred at Wibaux last Sunday, February 24th. Miss Wallace, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. O. Wallace of near Beach is well known here as she has lived with her parents since they came to this place from Norwak, Wisconsin some eight years ago. She attended school in this city for about two years and has many friends, especially among the young people as she was a leader in the circles of the junior society, and is highly esteemed by all who know her.
Of the groom, we can but reiterate voluntary expressions and remarks we have heard in talking to his friends. Mr. Bartheld came from LaCrosse, Wisconsin about four years ago and is engaged in farming on a large scale about eight miles north of Beach. He is known as a scientific farmer who attends his work in a methodical manner and is generally known as being a royal entertainer by those who have enjoyed his hospitality.
Mr. and Mrs. Bartheld will be at home after March first, on the Bartheld ranch. The many acquaintances and friends of the newly married couple extend hearty congratulations and the Advance wishes to join in wishing them a happy and prosperous voyage through life.


March 1st, 1918

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Gordon of near Bonnie View, on February 14th, 1918, a son. It is reported that mother and babe are doing nicely.


March 8th, 1918

James Willard McNiece
The entire community was shocked and bereaved to learn the sudden death of Willard McNiece, son of Mathew McNiece living five miles southwest of Beach. The little fellow seemed to be in good health up to a few days before his death. He was taken with a sudden attack of appendicitis and was taken to the hospital at Dickinson on the early train last Saturday morning. His only chance for recovery was an immediate operation and it was found that his appendix had busted and a second operation was performed Saturday evening. Sunday morning a change for the better was noticed and he wanted to be taken home. He talked a great deal about his relatives and friends and called for them. About noon Sunday he took a sudden change for the worse and passed peacefully away at 4:10 that afternoon. He was a very ambitious little fellow with great hopes for the future and although he was prepared for death and realized that it was approaching, he remarked several times that he would like to live a while longer. It is all too sad that he could not be spared to a world which so much needs living models of the nobler virtues. At school and at home Willie was always cheerful and stood ready to help others. He was a great favorite among his school mates.
His parents and brother, John were by his death bed.
James Willard McNiece was born Feb. 20, 1906 on the homestead in Montana, where the family reside at the present time. He was, at the time of his death, twelve years and eleven days old.
He leaves to mourn his sudden demise, his parents; four sisters, Alice McNiece, teaching at Fairview, Mont.; Mrs. Mary Cassidy of National, Washington; Mrs. Kathrine ….owden of Beach; Blanche McNiece, and five brothers; Daniel, John, Frank, Paul, all of whom were present with the exception of Paul, who is in France. (Transcribers Note: only four brothers were noted in the article) Funeral services were held in the Catholic church yesterday morning at 10 o’clock. Rev. Father Wolpers officiating.
The bereaved relatives have the heartfelt sympathy of the entire community.


March 8th, 1918

Mrs. J. F. Cassidy of National, Washington, arrived here Monday to be present at the funeral of her young brother whose death occurred last Sunday.


March 15th, 1918

Card Of Thanks

We wish to thank the many kind friends and neighbors who so kindly assisted us during the illness and death of our beloved son and brother. We also wish to thank the members of the junior class and others for the beautiful floral tributes. It is at time, our hour of trail, that your love and sympathy is most appreciated.
Mr. and Mrs. Matt McNiece
Mr. and Mrs. Franak McNiece (sic)
Mr. and Mrs. John C. McNiece
Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Howden
Mr. and Mrs. Jim Cassidy
Alice, Paul, Blanche and Leo McNiece


March 15th, 1918

Golden Valley Pioneer Dead

Word has been received from Dodge Center, Minnesota of the death of an old time citizen of the Golden Valley, R. D. Knapp of Alpha. Mr. Knapp has been sick for some time past and was in Minnesota for the benefit of his health. We have been unable to get the full particulars on his life as yet.
The many friends were grieved to hear the news and extend to the family their heartfelt sympathy.


March 15th, 1918

Dr. and Mrs. Stough are the proud parents of a baby boy born Wednesday.


March 22nd, 1918

Pioneer Resident Passed Away

- Saturday, March 9 at 4 o’clock in the afternoon, at Dodge Center, Minn, R. D. Knapp of Alpha passed to the great beyond. Mr. Knapp was born in Minnesota January 1, 1860. He spent his early life in Minnesota and later went to Bristol, S. Dak., where he proved up on a homestead near that place and worked at his trade as a carpenter. Eleven years ago Mr. Knapp came to the Golden Valley and settled near Alpha.
R. D. Knapp made a great many friends while here and all were grieved to hear the sad news. The sympathy of the community is extended to the family in this their sad hour.
Seven children survive, Leslie, the eldest lives at Mound in Slope country; Vernon R. Knapp, somewhere in France; Gladys Dyer in Marmarth; Loren Knapp, on the home place near Alpha; Ruby and Louis reside with their brother, Mr. and Mrs. Dyer. Ruby and Louis were present at the funeral held in Minnesota.


March 22nd, 1918

Obituary

Anton Anderson of Beach, died last Friday, March 15, 1918, of diabetes. Anton was the second eldest son of John Anderson and was born in Norway in 1896, came to this country in 1899 and has lived here ever since.
The deceased has many friends in the community and was an industrious and hard working young man, liked by all who knew him.
The family have the sympathy of their friends in this hour of trial.


March 22nd, 1918

O. C. Kucheman Died Saturday

The sad intelligence came by wire that O. C. Kucheman of Maquoketta, Iowa, had passed away in Chicago last Saturday. The many friends of our former townsman were shocked to learn of his demise. His heart was of gold. He was one of natures noblemen and friends and friendship were sacred to him. He was the soul of honor.
He leaves a wife and daughter to mourn his loss besides a multitude of friends. The banks in this city all observed the funeral hour of former cashier Golden Valley State bank, O. C. Kucheman, which was held at the family home in Iowa, by closing Wednesday afternoon.


March 29th, 1918

To Late For Last Week -

Bryan Clark celebrated his eight birthday last Friday. After recess, the teacher and pupils surprised him and in the remaining time, children’s games were played. Light refreshments were served and all were treated with a goodly share of Bryan’s birthday cake.


March 29th, 1918

Pioneer Resident Passed Away

Franklin Benjamin Stout, died at his home 22 miles southeast, of this city, Tuesday, March 26, 1918, aged 61 years, 1 month and 18 days. He was born in 1857 in North Carolina.
He was a man of generous impulses, and never forgot the hospitable ways of the pioneer. Everyone could find food and shelter at the Stout ranch. He was a kind neighbor and a friend. He had borne adversity bravely and enjoyed prosperity quietly. He had filled the various relations of life, as soon, husband, father, brother, friend and filled them well. Who can do more?
The many neighbors and friends extend their heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved family at his time.


March 29th, 1918

A. J. Ziebarth and wife of Alpha returned from Austin, Minnesota, Sunday, where they had been called by the illness and death of Mrs. Ziebarth’s mother, Mrs. J. S. Young which occurred Tuesday morning at 11 o’clock.


March 29th, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Sprague were made happy by the arrival of an infant daughter Tuesday.


March 29th, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Teck Woods are the proud parents of a son, arrived on Tuesday.


March 29th, 1918

Born to Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Tjornhom, Monday, a girl.


March 29th, 1918

Stella Marie Douglas

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. Douglas of Carlyle died on Tuesday, March 16, 1918. Stella Marie Douglas was born in Illinois, where the remains were taken for burial.


April 5th, 1918

The friends of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Kugel sympathize with them in the loss of their baby girl, Lillian Georgina, born 5 a.m. March 25th, died 3 a.m. the 28th, hemorrhage of the bowels. Mr. Kugel was called to Dickinson Wednesday evening on account of the baby’s serious illness. Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Wetstone motored over to bring the little body back to Killdeer for burial. Mr. Kugel remained at Dickinson to comfort his wife. - Killdeer Tribune


April 5th, 1918

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Odman was brightened by the advent of a fine boy Saturday.


April 12th, 1918

Tom Scott returned Sunday from a trip to Park River, where he had been called on account of the death of his mother.


April 12th, 1918

Accidentally Killed

C. P. Hale, aged 32 years, of Ollie, Montana, died Monday from wounds inflicted by the accidental discharge of a gun he was cleaning.
Mr. Hale was manager of the Mandan Mercantile company at Ollie and has a host of friends who are grieved to learn of his death.
He leaves a wife and child to mourn his loss. Funeral services were held under the direction of the I.O.O.F. lodge in Beach Thursday.


April 12th, 1918

Ollie News Items (Carlyle Herald) -

An eight and a half pound boy was born Thursday morning to Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Prouty, south of town. He is a handsome little fellow, “a real picture of his pa.” Mother and baby are doing nicely.


April 19th, 1918

N. P. Reed Died Wed.

The many friends of our former mayor and townsman N. P. Reed will be grieved to learn of his sudden death at Winona, Minn., Wednesday morning at 9:00 o’clock. A telegram came to Mrs. Reed and she immediately left for Winona. Mr. Reed had been confined to the hospital for some time but late reports received were favorable to his recovery and it was expected by his friends and family that he was getting better. Mr. N. P. Reed was mayor of Beach in 1912 to 1914 and practically all the improvements that were made to put Beach in the city class were made while he was at the head of our city. He won many friends in his fair and impartial administration. He was for nearly 6 years manager of the Beach Lumber & Coal Co. of this city. The many friends join in extending their heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved family.


April 26th, 1918

- Belfield Times

Geo. Chrysler tells us that he and Mrs. Chrysler celebrated their twenty-fifth wedding anniversary last Monday. On giving George the once-over we decided his youthful countenance was mighty poor evidence of his twenty-five years of married life. But George says that’s what it is to have such a fine wife.


April 26th, 1918

Alpha News (Too late for last week) -

The home of Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Otremba was saddened by the death of their little daughter, Lillian, who died Wednesday morning. The funeral services will be held by the Catholic church at Burkey on Friday. The family have the sympathy of the entire community in this the sad hour of their bereavement. The mother is just recovering from a very serious illness and the sorrow coming at this time makes it extremely hard for her.


May 10th, 1918

Sentinel Butte Republican -

H. O. Sivesind Passes Away

H. O. Sivesind died of heart failure at his home south of town on Friday, April 26th. The sudden death was a shock to the family and entire community. Deceased was born in Winneshiek county, Iowa, January 13, 1867. In 1901 he was united in marriage to Sophie Wisland. Their home was made in the vicinity of Wan……., Iowa, until the year 1908 when they moved to their homestead south of Sentinel Butte, where they have since made their residence.
He leaves to mourn his death his wife and five children, besides his mother, two brothers - I. J. Sivesind of Waukon, Iowa, and Ben Sivesind of Orland, California, and one sister, Mrs. Geo. Selsvold, who resides southwest of town. Funeral services were held at the Norwegian Lutheran church in Beach, on Sunday, Rev. Tjorn… officiating. The remains were taken to Waukon, Iowa, and were accompanied by Mrs. H. O. Sivesind and little son Adolph.
Mr. Sivesind was a man of s….ling worth and was liked and respected by all who knew him. He was a good neighbor, a faithful husband and indulgent father and was always straightforward in his dealings with his fellow men. A host of friends extend sympathy to the bereaved relatives in this time of sorrow.


May 10th, 1918

Golva News Notes -

A surprise party was given for Elmay Zeigweid Wednesday, as it was her birthday. The evening was spent in playing cards, the ladies prize was taken by Annabelle Johnson, while Knute Kloving took the gentlemen’s prize. After this a delightful luncheon was served. Every one present report a very pleasant time.


May 10th, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Davis are the proud parents of a baby girl born Sunday morning.


May 17th, 1918

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Fred Brus….. of St. Phillips, a girl, Tuesday, May 7.


May 17th, 1918

Born to Mr. and Mrs. O. H. Pick…ng a girl Wednesday the 8th of May.


May 17th, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Thompson are the proud parents of a boy born on the 7th.


May 17th, 1918

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Buel Richards a boy Monday, May 6.


May 17th, 1918

Julius Chapman Died Tues.

The subject of this sketch was born in the state of New York on August 23, 1841, and died at his home in Sentinel Butte on Tuesday morning, May 7, 1918, from a stroke of paralysis, having been in poor health for several months.
Mr. Chapman grew to manhood in the Empire state and enlisted on the Union side of the great Civil War with a New York regiment and served throughout the struggle receiving an honorable discharge. After the war he came west to Minnesota, where he was married to Miss Lillian Hodges in 1867, to which union 10 children were born. Amelia Trana of Henning, Minnesota; John Chapman north of this place; Esther Henderson of this place; Estella Morris of this place; Hattie Lumblad east of this place; Flossie who died in infancy; Nellie Stewart, now deceased; Levi Chapman of Seattle, Washington; Mabel Murphy of Cour’dalene, Idaho, and Addie Taunt east of this place. Mrs. Chapman still survives her husband.
Owing to the long distance, the only child from away who attended the funeral was Mrs. Trana of Minnesota. A few years ago the deceased moved from Minnesota to Golden Valley county, and has lived at this place and Beach during the most of that time. He was a man who was honorable in all his dealings, was always of an optimistic nature, and was cheerful and hopeful to the end. He could count his friends by the thousands and none can say that his life was spent in vain.
Funeral services were held at the Sentinel Butte Congregational church at 2 p.m., Wednesday by Rev. Ricter and interment in the cemetery east of town. All sympathize with the bereaved relatives. - Sentinel Butte Republican


May 17th, 1918

Mrs. Robert Wand Funeral Monday

The funeral services of Mrs. Robert Wand were held at the Catholic church Monday morning at 10:00 o’clock. Rev. Father Hake officiating. A large concourse of relatives and friends were present to pay their respects to the departed one’s memory. Interment was made in the Catholic cemetery. The deceased was a devout Catholic and held the ties of home and church sacred; a loving wife and a fond mother, and is greatly missed from this sphere. Her untimely demise occurred Wednesday, May 7, 1918. Mrs. Wand was seemingly well five days before, complications with pneumonia set in and made their claim in death. All earthly aid was given, but to no avail. The final summons came; she closed her eyes to the sleep that knoweth no wakening. Active in life’s round of duty and love, but gone tomorrow.
Mrs. Robert Want, nee Ralph, was a native of Oshkosh, Wis., and was thirty four years of age at the time of her death.
She was married to R. P. Wand at Oshkosh eleven years ago and immediately moved to Beach with her husband, residing here ever since. Three children were born to their union: Robert, aged 10 years; Dorothy, aged 6 years, and Lawrence, aged 4 years, all of whom are living. Besides husband and children, deceased leaves to mourn their loss, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Rolph, of Oshkosh, Wis., and three sisters and three brothers. The other relatives present at the obsequies were: Fred F. Rolph, of Carpenter Creek, Mont., and Robert Rolph, of Joplin, Missouri, brothers of the deceased, and E. A. Rolph and wife of Fessenden, N.D.


May 24th, 1918

A brand new son was born to Mr. and Mrs. C. G. Johnson last Thursday.


May 24th, 1918

Mrs. J. B. Linger and children have gone east. They were in receipt of a telegram informing them of the sad news of the death of Mrs. Linger’s father. We are unable to learn the particulars.


May 24th, 1918

A. Anderson Dead

The sad news of the death of A. Anderson, one of Golva’s merchants was received at Golva, Saturday. Mr. Anderson went to Wyoming a short time ago for his health and died there following an operation. He leaves a wife and two daughters in Golva and a son in France. His family has the sympathy of a host of friends here and at Beach, where they are well known. - Sentinel Butte Republican


May 24th, 1918

Elmer Miller Reported Killed - Member Co. M

The sad intelligence has reached Beach by letter that Elmer Miller was killed in action in France. The many friends will be grieved to learn of his death. He was a member of Co. M of Beach.
Elmer worked for Lovell Bros. and C. H. Moulton at different times and was well liked by his employers.


May 31st, 1918

Alpha News -

Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Ziebarth went to Belfield Sunday to attend the funeral of Mr. Ziebarth’s nephew, Melvin Ziebarth. They returned to their home Wednesday.


May 31st, 1918

Alpha News -

Mrs. George Peterson died at her home near Alpha Saturday morning May 25. She had been ill a short time with pneumonia. Mrs. Peterson was born in Germany forty- three years ago. Came to American when quite young. Has resided in North Dakota many years. She was a kind, loving wife and mother and a good neighbor. She leaves a husband and twelve children, an aged father, four sisters and three brothers to mourn their loss. The sisters and one brother were here for the funeral from Judson, this state. Funeral services were held at the Alpha U. B. church Sunday p.m., Rev. Bovey officiating. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the entire community.


May 31st, 1918

Alpha News -

Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Ziebarth went to Belfield Sunday to attend the funeral of Mr. Ziebarth’s nephew, Melvin Ziebarth. They returned to their home Wednesday.


May 31st, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Wells are the proud parents of a baby boy, born Saturday, May 25.


May 31st, 1918

John Beto was called to his former home at Princeton, Minn., last Thursday on account of the sudden death of his father.


June 7th, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Callahan are the proud parents of a baby boy born Sunday, June 2.


June 7th, 1918

John Beto of Golva, who has just returned from attending the funeral of his father at Princeton, Minn., received a telegram Monday which contained the information that his brother in law had passed away as a result of an operation for appendicitis. Mr. Beto left on the first train for Minn., to be present at the obsequies.


June 7th, 1918

Arvid News Notes -

Miss Florence Herrick and Sylvanus French were united in marriage Saturday, June 1, at Glendive. They were accompanied by Viola Cornellisen and William Herrick. Both the contracting parties are popular young people in this community and they have a host of friends who wish them a long and happy married life.


June 7th, 1918

Andrew Anderson Dead

Andrew Anderson of Golva, N.D. died May 18th, 1918, of kidney trouble, after an operation at Hot Springs, Wyoming. He was born at Marshall, Wis., and was 56 years of age at the time of his death. He is survived by a wife, Thea, daughter, Thressa who is completing her nurse’s training in Chicago, daughter Adella of Golva, and a son Raymond was enlisted in the army last fall and is now in France. He also leaves two brothers, Martin of Aberdeen, S.D., and Sidney of Rowley, Iowa, and four sisters, Mrs. Peter Norbeck of South Dakota, Mrs. T. Hood of St. Paul and Mrs. I. Daffer of Fairmont, Minn., and Mrs. Martha Bostad of Taylor, Wis.
Deceased was married in 1893 to Thea Thompson, daughter of Reier Thompson of Jackson county. For fifteen years he was engaged in the general mercantile business in Blair, until 1914 when he spent a year in Iowa and then went to Golva, N.D., where he conducted a store until the time of his death. He was a member of the Modern Woodman Camp of Blair.
Funeral services were held today from the J. O. Knutson home, Rev. Boe officiated. - Blair (Wis.) Press


June 14th, 1918

John Beto and Art Gerth returned Friday from Princeton, Minn., where they were attending the funeral of their brother-in-law.


June 14th, 1918

Fatal Auto Accident - Little Baby Killed

Samuel B. Whitmer and family of north of Beach, who were visiting at Glendive, making the trip by auto, when returning home Monday Mr. Whitmer was taken sick while driving. He has asked his wife several times to help arouse him on the way as he felt faint.
He finally was overcome and lost control of the car and it ran off the road into a ditch, tipping over against a fence, which perhaps was instrumental in saving more of the family from fatal injuries.
The infant child lost its life after a few short breaths. Another young boy of the family had his leg broken.
The sympathy of the community is extended to the grief stricken family.


June 21st, 1918

Arvid News -

Mr. and Mrs. Ben Wentland are the proud parents of a fine baby girl, born Sunday.


June 21st, 1918

Rutherford - Lovell

The prettiest home wedding of the season took place Monday evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Lovell. Miss Hazel D. Rutherford, sister of Mrs. M. L. Lovell became the bride of Harry B. Lovell.
William R. Thatcher, minister of the Methodist church read the ring service which was very impressive.
The two young people had been friends for years but the marriage at this time came as a happy surprise to their many friends. Only the immediate members of the family were present at the ceremony. Mrs. M. A. Rutherford, mother, and Miss Merle Rutherford, sister of the bride from Gilby, N.D., and E. H. Lovell, father of the groom from Los Angeles attended the wedding. The mother, Mrs. E. H. Lovell, being unable to attend on account of sickness.
Miss Rutherford graduated from Burroughs school of music at Detroit. Taking advanced study in Wesley Conservatory in Grand Fords, where she also taught one year. Miss Rutherford made many friends while instructor of music and kindergarten work here the past year in the Beach schools. The groom, corporal Harry B. Lovell is a brother of Guy and Mark Lovell of this place. He operated a hardware store at Golva which he sold out to answer the call of the colors and volunteered his service to the country and mankind by enlisting in the navy and was sent to the Marine Detachment U.S. Ship St. Louis. Harry was a graduate from the University of North Dakota and a member Sigma-Chi. He arrived home Monday on a seven day furlough. He is a young man of sterling worth and favorably known throughout the Golden Valley. Their many friends wish them much joy at this time.


June 21st, 1918

Schmit - Slominski

A very pretty church wedding occurred in the Catholic church at Wibaux last Monday. Two of our best young people were the principals. Leo. Slominiski (sic), a promising young farmer was wedded to Miss Anna Schmit of Wadena, Minn., who has been making her home in this city for the past few months. Rev. Father S. J. Cieslewicz performed the marriage ceremony.
The happy couple will spend their honeymoon visiting at Minto, N.D., former home of the groom, will spend a week at the lakes at Perham, Minn., also the Twin Cities and other points in Minnesota. They will be home to their many friends on their farm northeast of Beach July 15th. A long happy and prosperous life for them is the wish of their many friends.


June 21st, 1918

Douglas - Peterman

A quiet home wedding took place at the home of Mrs. Briley Douglas at Carlyle when Ruby Bell Douglas became the bride of Byron Peterman.
The ceremony was performed by M. S. Bovey, pastor of the Carlyle church. Ruth Baldwin acted as bridesmaid and Edd A. Peterman was best man.
Ruby Douglas is a young lady with many fine qualities and has endeared herself to a large circle of friends who love her for her gentle and kindly ways. The groom is a young farmer of the south country.
A large delegation of friends came to Beach to see the happy couple take No. 3 for Glendive where they will visit a short time, after which they will return to the Fred Douglas farm near Carlyle and make their home at that place. Here’s wishing them much joy and happiness in their new life.


June 21st, 1918

Johnston - Olson

A very pretty wedding occurred at the home of Edgar O. Johnston, June 19th, 1918. Miss Lillian Johnston, teacher south east of Beach and Rudolph Olson, a progressive young farmer of the same vicinity being the contracting parties. The bride was beautifully gowned in white satin and crepe de chine, the groom wore the conventional black. Clara Olson acted as bridesmaid and John Olson as best man and little three year old Norrean Johnson was the ring bearer. Rev. W. R. Thatcher performed the ceremony, using the pretty ring service. Miss Bessie Boardman and Miss Lillian Zellsdorf presided at the piano. About thirty-five relatives and friends witnessed the ceremony and after extending congratulations and best wishes partook of a sumptuous wedding dinner. The happy young couple will take up housekeeping on their farm five miles southeast of Beach.


June 21st, 1918

Mrs. Margaret A. Rutherford of Gilvy, North Dakota, announces the marriage of her daughter, Hazel Dell to corporal Harry B. Lovell of the U.S. Marine Corps, Monday, June Seventeenth Nineteen Hundred Eighteen, at Beach, North Dakota.


June 21st, 1918

Card Of Thanks

We wish to express our heartfelt thanks to the kind friends and neighbors for the kindly assistance and sympathy given us in the death of our baby and thru the sickness of our boy.
Gratefully yours,
Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Whitmer, and family


June 28th, 1918

Golva News (too late for last week) -

The people of Golva were shocked to learn of the death of Albret Cross of Burkey. For the last few months he has been staying, accompanied by his mother in Kansas City, Mo. He leaves a mother and two sisters, Miss Margaret Cross and Mrs. Tony Kreitinger to mourn his demise.


June 28th, 1918

Golva News (too late for last week) -

Knute Kloving left Monday for Fergus Falls, Minn., to attend the funeral of his brother-in-law.


June 28th, 1918

Golva News (too late for last week) -

It is reported that Alfred Kirkpatrick has enlisted in the U.S. Army and expects to leave for camp soon.


June 28th, 1918

Golva News (too late for last week) -

Some of the little friends of Miss Constance Davis enjoyed a very pleasant afternoon at her home on Saturday afternoon, it being her birthday.


June 28th, 1918

Noyes Baby Dies

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Noyes died last Sunday. Mrs. Noyes has been quite seriously sick but is improving nicely at this writing. The fond hopes of the young couple can only be realized in the words of consolation of David at the time of the death of his son. “For now I know that he will no more come to me but I will go to meet him.”
Condolence in their bereavement is offered by the community in this their hour of trial.


July 5th, 1918

Alm - Welsh Nuptial

One of the prettiest weddings of the season occurred on the 19th of June, at high noon in the Deronda Lutheran church when Miss Alvina Sophia, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Alm, became the bride of Mr. Raleigh H. Welsh of Yates, Mont. Maurice Alm of the aviation corps of the army who is stationed in St. Paul acted as best man and Miss Maybell Sistad as bridesmaid. The other attendants were Edward Larson of Minneapolis and Miss Gena Alm, sister of the bride. Alice Christianson and Alice Johnson, little cousins of the bride acted as ring bearers and flower girls respectively.
Rev. S. Romsdahl was the officiating pastor.
The bride and groom entered the church to the strains of Lorengrins’ Wedding march which was played by Miss Alice M. Gilbert of Casselton, N.D., a cousin of the bride.
The bride was beautifully gowned in white georgette crepe and carried a shower bouquet of orchids and bridal roses. The bride’s attendants were tastily gowned in pink and carried bouquets of pink roses and sweet peas. The church was beautifully decorated with pink peonies and ferns. After the ceremony the guests assembled at the Alm home where congratulations were extended to the happy couple and where they partook of a most bountiful dinner served by Miss Sena Torgerson and Miss Elsie Peterson. The out of town guests were Mrs. Sam Johnson and children of Minneapolis; Dr. Lloyd L. Gilbert of Minneapolis; Mrs. Nannie C. Gilbert of Casselton, N.D., and Mr. and Mrs. John Sievert and children of Farmington, Wis. The bride grew to woman hood in this community and is honored and respected by all that know her. The groom is a prosperous farmer of Yates, Mont, and has made many friends during his short stay here. The bride’s going away suit was of sand colored gabardine with accessories to match. Mr. and Mrs. Welch (sic) will be at home to their many friends after July 15th at Yates, Montana. - Osceola (Wis.) Sun.


July 12th, 1918

Smith - Schimmel Wedding in St. Paul

The wedding of Miss Cora Schimmel, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Schimmel, 1173 Hague Avenue, St. Paul, Minn., and Harry James Smith of Beach, N.D., took place Tuesday morning, June 18th, 1918 at St. Luke’s Catholic church; Rev. James C. Byrne, vicar general of the Catholic diocese, performing the ceremony. Leopold Bruenner played the bridal music and Jane Holland Cameron sang several numbers.
The bride wore a tailored costume of navy blue cloth and a white tulle hat. She wore a corsage bouquet of orchards and lilies of the valley. Miss Marie Schimmel was her sister’s maid of honor and only attendant. She wore a suit of tan cloth and pink georgette. She carried sweet peas and Ophelia roses. Mr. E. B. Taylor of Minneapolis, one of Mr. Smith’s classmates acted as best man. After the ceremony a wedding breakfast for relatives and members of the bridal party was served at the St. Paul Hotel. Mr. and Mrs. Smith will be at home at Beach, N. Dak.
Mrs. John Baer, a sister of the bridegroom, gave a theatre party on Monday evening the 27th for her brother and his fiancee. Wednesday evening the 13th, Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Taylor, Sr., of Minneapolis, entertained at dinner followed by dancing for them, and Thursday the 18th, Mrs. C. G. Lawrence entertained in a similar manner. Mr. and Mrs. D. J. McMahon entertained at dinner June 15th.


July 12th, 1918

Lund - Plomasen Wedding Wednesday

Pink peonies and greenery were used in the decoration of the living room at the home of Mrs. Olive Gaard, Third Street north, for the wedding of her foster daughter, Miss Ragan Lund and Thor Garfield Plomasen of Beach, N.D., which took place at high noon Wednesday. Mrs. E. H. Gilbertson of Finley, N.D., a cousin of the bride, sounded the strains of the Lohengren wedding march promptly at noon and the bridal couple, unattended, entered the room and took their places. Rev. E. E. Bernston, pastor of the Pontuppidan Lutheran church officiated using the ring service. After the marriage vows were exchanged, Mrs. Gilbertson sang two solos, “I Love You Truly,” and “O Promise Me.” The bridal gown was fashioned of ivory crepe de chine combined with georgette in the same shade and was elaborated with pearls and hand embroidery. A wedding veil was arranged in cap effect and was caught in place by a wreath of orange blossoms. Bands of pearls also adorned the veil. The only ornament worn by the bride was the groom’s gift, a pearl necklace. Following the ceremony a four course dinner was served and covers laid for the intimate friends and family members who had witnessed the wedding. Mr. Plomasen and his bride left this afternoon for a short outing at Detroit, Minn., and they will then go to Minneapolis for a week’s visit. They will be at home to their many friends at Beach after August 5, where the groom is city engineer and surveyor. Mrs. Plomasen traveled in a suit of navy blue taffeta with accessories to correspond. Mrs. R. Olson and Mrs. and Mrs. C. H. Gilbertson of Finley were the only out of town guests here for the wedding. - Fargo Forum


July 12th, 1918

Golva News -

A. J. Foos left Friday for Indiana, where he will attend the funeral of his brother.


July 12th, 1918

N. F. Batholome of the Model has returned from Goodhue, Minn., where he was called on account of the death of his father.


July 12th, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Erdman are the proud parents of a baby, which arrived June 26th.


July 12th, 1918

Edward H. Woodward Died Saturday

Edward H. Woodward was born May 5th 1843 at Worcaster, Mass. He moved to Janesville, Wis., when eleven years of age; from there to Beaver Dam, Wis., where he grew to manhood and was united in marriage to Ruth E. King at Iowa City, on January 2, 1867. To this union eight children were born of which five are living to mourn their loss with his wife. They are William H., Carrie M., Warren E., Harry A., and Allen E., all living at Beach, N.Dak. One sister proceeded him in death, Mrs. M. H. Thomas at Milwaukee, Wis., May, 1913. He moved with his family near Villisca, Iowa, in 1870 and was engaged in farming for a number of years, afterwards making his home in Villisca. He had been in poor health for a number of years and came to Beach June 5th to be near his children, where he passed away at his daughter’s home at 1:15 July 6th at the age of 75 years, 2 months and 1 day. Cause of his death being dropsy, leakage of the heart and a complication of other diseases. Funeral services were held at the home, conducted by Rev. W. R. Thatcehr, July 7. The remains were taken to Villisca for interment Tuesday on arriving with a brief service at the grave. Harry and Warren Woodward accompanied the body east. They celebrated their Golden wedding at Beach January 2, 1917.


July 19th, 1918

Bennett - Wolf

A quiet home wedding took place at Brookings, S.D., on Friday, July 12, at the M.E. parsonage. Frank Wolf of Aurora, S.D., was united in marriage to Mrs. Mae Bennett, of Beach, North Dakota. There were present Mrs. Addie Beam and Fred Malcolm brother and sister of Mrs. Bennett. Mr. Wolf is a dealer in automobiles and runs a garage and cement block works at Aurora. Mr. and Mrs. Wolf will make their home in Aurora. Mrs. Bennett is an estimable woman and made many staunch friends while living in the Golden Valley, and rendered much valuable service in teaching in the various schools in the valley. She has been a consistent worker in the church and her friends join in wishing her joy in her new home.


July 19th, 1918

Death Overtakes Mrs. F. J. Snow

Mrs. Fann L. Snow died July 13, 1918 at Thermopolis, Wyoming where she had gone for treatment. Mrs. Snow had suffered for some years with poor health. A year ago last January she suffered a stroke of paralysis from which she never fully recovered. Fawn (sic) L. Sites was born in the state of Indiana July 31, 1878 and at the age of nine years came with her parents to Renville county, Minnesota when she was 16 years of age. They moved to Morrison county where she prepared herself for a teacher and went back to Redwood Falls, Renville county to teach her first term. She continued in the work of her chosen profession until her last illness. She joined the church of Christ at the age of seventeen and thru all her life was a devout christian worker. December 27, 1900 she was married to F. J. Snow at Little Falls, Indiana where they resided for some time when they moved to Courtney, S. Dak., where they lived three years, thence to Golden Valley county in 1908 where they have lived continuously on their farm near Burkey. She leaves to mourn their loss her husband, F. J. Snow, one son, age sixteen; Mrs. Fannie Truex, an aged grandmother, four sisters of whom Mrs. Snow was the oldest, Mrs. Dell Horstman of Bowerville, Minn.; Mrs. Edna Newberry, Crystal Springs, N. Dak; Mrs. Bessie Cooper, of Carlyle, N. Dak; Mrs. Hazel Newberry of Eden, Wash; also three brothers, Marian Sites of Montana; Harry A. Sites and Verne Sites of Golva, N.D. Both parents have been dead for some years. She was a woman of strong christian character, patient, loving and self-sacrificing.


July 26th, 1918

Word was received from Alfred Kirkpatrick, who lately enlisted in the U. S. Artillery service, states that at present he is training at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. He is the third of the Kirkpatrick family to join the service.


July 26th, 1918

Mrs. Zimmerman Died Friday. Burial At Lidgerwood North D.

Mrs. Katherine Zimmerman died Friday, July 19th, 1918. She had been in the Dickinson hospital the past two months receiving treatment and returned to her home only last Tuesday. Her husband, mother and sister were at her bedside at the time of her death. She was born in Greenwood Prairie, near Mozeppa, Minn., and was 48 yrs., 11 mos. and 13 days old when death came. She was married 13 years ago to Wm. Zimmerman and moved to Beach some 7 years ago. She was a devout Catholic and was secretary of St. Anne’s Altar Society up to the time of her death, which society had a Requiem High Mass for her at 9 o’clock Tuesday morning, July 23. The side Altars being beautifully decorated with her own plants. Her body was shipped to Ligerwood, N.D., on No. 4 Sunday morning where the funeral was held Tuesday morning.


July 26th, 1918

Mrs. W. H. Middleton Died This Morning

Mrs. W. H. Middleton of Rocky Butte died this morning at 10:00 o’clock. She had been failing in health for some time, having had an operation this spring. We are unable to get the full particulars for this issue.


July 26th, 1918

A daughter was born Tuesday, July 23rd to Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Schaeffer of Golva.


August 2nd, 1918

S. A. Middleton of Milestone, Canada, who was called to Beach by the death of his brother’s wife, Mrs. W. H. Middleton, started on his return trip to Milestone on No. 2 Tuesday. On Sunday evening Mr. Middleton gave a very inspirational lecture to a large audience in the Rocky Butte church. None who heard it could help being inspired with a greater zeal for doing God’s work here upon this earth. We hope that Mr. Moddleton (sic) will visit us again when he can be spared longer from his Canadian home and that we may be so fortunate as to hear more of his stirring addresses for God’s work. Mr. Middleton hold four preaching services every Sunday when he is at home.


August 2nd, 1918

Mrs. H. E. True received word Thursday that her father had passed away at the hospital at Bismarck, N.D., and she left immediately with the children for the parental home at Underwood, N.D. The true family had expected the gentlemen to visit them here at any time and his sudden death was a shock to them. - Wibaux Pioneer.


August 2nd, 1918

Pioneer Resident Passed Away

Mrs. W. H. Middleton died at her home near Rocky Butte July 26, 1918, after being confined to her bed for the past four weeks. Mrs. Middleton has suffered from poor health for many years but always took care of her household duties, also maintained an active part in the church work and other social duties of the vicinity with the exception of time when confined to her home by severe and short illnesses to which she was subject. Last October her condition became so serious that an operation was deemed necessary by the local physicians and she accordingly went to the Bismarck hospital, the operation was successful and she returned to her home and had been quite actively engaged in home, church and Red Cross work until the last illness which was not considered critical by relatives or friends until two days before her death. Carrie P. Pulver was born in Wisconsin April 6, 1861, removed with her mother and brothers to Garden City, Minnesota, her father having died in the army at the time of the Civil War. At this place she spent her childhood days. In her early girlhood she came with the other members of the family to Byron, Minn., where she was baptized, and was received into the membership of the First Baptist church of Byron. She was united in Marriage to W. H. Middleton May 7, 1894, and they resided in their farm near Byron until the summer of 1903, when she located with her husband at Rocky Butte, North Dakota. When the congregational church of Sentinel Butte was organized she became one of the charter members, later being identified with the Congregational church at Rocky Butte. The first meeting of the Rocky Butte ladies aid society was held at the home of Mrs. Moddleton (sic), at that early date the country was sparsely settled and six women were all that were present, but they organized the society, Mrs. Middleton becoming a charter member and she was always willing and ready to help the work in every way that she could. She was an untiring worker for her family and a large circle who needed help and encouragement. The portrayal of her life can be found in the text Mark 14-8. “She hath done what she could.” The funeral services were held at Rocky Butte church Sunday, July 28, attended by a large concourse of friends and neighbors. Rev. Chas. Richter of Sentinel Butte officiating; thought of comfort and encouragement being based upon the words of the scripture Zachariah 14-7, “But it shall come to pass that at Evening time it shall be light.” Mrs. Middleton leaves to mourn their loss her husband, two stepsons, J. E. and T. R. Middleton and a niece, Lois Boyer all of this place; four brothers, Henry Pulver of Bagley, Minn., Wm. Pulver of Bellingham, Wash., Arthur Waite of Washington State, Fred Waits of Weyburn, Canada; two sisters, Mrs. Almedia Harris of Wibaux, Mont., and Mrs. Ida Richmond of Washington state. S. A. Middleton of Milestone, Canada, came to be present at the funeral. The entire community joins in extending their heartfelt sympathy to the sorrowing relatives in this their hour of bereavement.


August 9th, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Herman Minchow have returned to their home south of Beach from a five months visit in California and Minnesota. They visited at the home of Mrs. Minchow’s sister in California and while in Minnesota they visited with Mr. Minchow’s relatives. A great deal of the pleasure of the trip was marred by the death of Carl M. Minchow, the father and Emma M. a sister while the couple were visiting there. The death of the two relatives occurred within five weeks of each other.


August 9th, 1918

Ollie News Items -

The funeral services of E. E. Beach were held in the U. B. church on July 31st, conducted by Rev. Bovee. Mr. Beach was born in Knox Co., Ohio, April 1st, 1852, and departed this life July 29, 1918 in the 67th year of his age. About four years ago, he with his family moved from Courtenay, N.Dak., to a homestead near Stuart, N.D. During his illness of several years past he suffered a great deal without any prospect of recovery. About ten days prior to his death he moved to Ollie, where on the 28th he received the third and fatal stroke of paralysis. A wife and 5 children, Roland of Long Prairie, Minn., Mrs. F. S. Wilson of Courtenay, N.D., Troy and the Misses Bernice and Brian of Ollie survive him.


August 9th, 1918

The baby boy born to Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Gilman has received the name of Thomas Eugene. He seems to be getting along fine with his new name.


August 16th, 1918

Golva News -

About 30 friends of Miss Helen Lichler gathered at the Benton home where she is employed, Sunday in honor of her eighteenth birthday. The afternoon and evening was enjoyably spent in music and games. At six o’clock a delightful luncheon was served. She received many useful and beautiful presents from those present and also the best wishes for her future happiness.


August 16th, 1918

Mrs. and Mrs. Charles Purvis are the proud parents of an 8 lb boy, born to them last Monday. All concerned getting along nicely.


August 16th, 1918

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Ben Brown last Sunday an 8 lb baby girl.


August 16th, 1918

A baby girl was born Sunday August 4 to Mr. and Mrs. Beldon Roberts. Mother and child are doing nicely.


August 16th, 1918

Pleasant Birthday Party

About thirty friends of Miss Lydia Slocumb and Mrs. J. M. Stecker met at the latter’s home 10 miles north of Beach to celebrate the birthdays of the two parties. The guests were seated at the table at 1:30 p.m. and were served a sumptuous dinner. Games and outdoor sports furnished the fun for the men in the afternoon while the ladies were entertained by a number of musical selections by Mrs. Kist of the north county. About six the guests were again served to delicious light refreshments. Not until 1 p.m. (sic) did the guests depart for their several homes, all expressing themselves to the hostesses as having a delightful time and wishing them many more such happy birthdays.


August 16th, 1918

Popular Couple Married in Duluth
Former Beach Teacher Joins Prominent Auto Dealer in Wedlock in Minn. City Wednesday

The many friends of Edna Gray and Wm. Brandt will be pleased to learn of their wedding which occurred in Duluth, Minnesota, Wednesday, August 14, 1918, at the Congregational church, Rev. Thorp officiating. A number of immediate friends of the couple were present to witness the ceremony. The bride was prettily gowned in blue with a white picture hat and gray shoes. The groom is one of Beach’s leading automobile dealers besides doing considerable farming near this city. He has been engaged in business here for over two years and has built up a large trade. He has made many friends since locating in the Golden Valley. The bride is no stranger to the community, she having held a position as teacher in the city schools and had gained the respect and confidence of all who knew her. She made many friends in Beach who will be pleased to have her return and make her future home in the city. Mr. Brandt returned Friday morning and Mrs. Brandt will arrive soon. We join with the many friends in offering the happy couple congratulations.


August 16th, 1918

Phillip Paulson Makes Supreme Sacrifice
He was in the Machine Gun Battalion Died July 23rd from Wounds Received in Action

A telegram received at the Paulson home Wednesday afternoon reads as follows: “Deeply regret to inform you that it is officially reported that private Phillip M. Paulson, machine gun battalion died July 23rd, 1918 from wounds received in action." Phillip was born August 16, 1897 at Kenyon, Minn., where he lived until four years ago, when he came west with the family to make Beach his home. Here he went to high school with the young people of this vicinity and had made many warm friends thru his joyous character and his music. He was unusually good in music. In fact he was pianist for the Co. M boys and even while in Europe several letters have came back saying that the boys had found an old piano to play on and had forgotten to eat their supper, in order to enjoy a musical hour or so together. He would have been 21 years of age Friday of this week. When the family last heard Phil was stationed some 25 miles from Beauvois and was quite well. He leaves to mourn his loss five sisters and two brothers: Miss Cora of Beach; Miss Frances of Beach; Miss Vera of Beach; Mrs. C. O. Carlson of Beach; Miss Hazel of St. Barnabus Hospital, Minneapolis; P. G. Paulson, Fergus Falls, Minn., and George Paulson, Butte, Mont. It is with the deepest sympathy that the Beach Advance wishes to join the people of Beach and vicinity in extending condolence.


August 23rd, 1918

The baby girl born to Mr. and Mrs. Stecker August 19th, died the same day of its birth and was buried in the Beach cemetery Tuesday, August 20. We wish to extend our sympathy to the bereaved parents.


August 23rd, 1918

Death of Pioneer Resident

Three weeks ago Wednesday, on the 31st of July, Mrs. H. C. Reichenecker died at the home of her oldest son, William at Santa Cruz, Calif. For the past four months of her life she was an invalid and was confined to the bed. She was ninety-two years old last May, and her death was due to old age. Mrs. Reichenecker came to Beach in 1908 and lived here until the death of her son Judson in 1915, when she went west and spent the last three years of her life in Santa Cruz. She was well known among the people of Beach and made many friends while here. She leaves a son, George and a daughter, Mary in Denver, Col, and a son in Santa Cruz, Calif.


August 30th, 1918

Golva News -

Mrs. Clark Reed and daughter Annie who have been visiting for the past month at the Kirkpatrick home left Wednesday for their new home at Seattle. They were accompanied by Edgar Reed.


August 30th, 1918

Mrs. Wm. Brandt, formerly Miss Edna Gray arrived in Beach last Saturday from Princeton, Minn., to make Beach her future home. All of her old friends are glad to see her coming back.


August 30th, 1918

A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Burns on August 26th. The little child was christened Harriet Margaret but only lived six hours. The body was laid to rest in the Catholic cemetery east of town. Mr. and Mrs. Burns have the sympathy of the community in their sorrow.


August 30th, 1918

Grim Reaper Takes Toll

The death of Mrs. Elizabeth Sunders occurred last Saturday afternoon at the home of her son Henry Sunders of Beach. She was seventy-eight years old and apparently in as good health as usual. Her death was very sudden, as she was only sick two hours before she died. Mrs. Sunders was born in Hanover, Germany in the year of 1830. Received her education and grew to womanhood at that place. She was married to Henry Sunders, Sr., in 1865 and shortly after came to America, where she made her home in Cincinatti, Ohio for a number of years. From there they went to Covington, Ky., and later to Freeport, Minn., and in 1907 moved to Beach. Mr. Sunders died one year later. She has always made Beach her home since. She leave to mourn her loss, Frank and Henry of Beach and Ben Sunders of Freeport, Minn. Beach and surrounding communities extend their sympathy to the bereaved relatives.


August 30th, 1918

Mrs. McKibbin Died Today

The sudden death of Mrs. Kari McKibbin occurred Friday morning August 30th at 4:30 at her home near Intake, Mont. Mrs. McKibbin has been ailing in health for some time past but it was believed last week that she was slowly recovering from a stroke that come on her three weeks ago. Mrs. McKibbin was born in Norway in 1871 in the month of June. When about 9 years old she came to America and has made her home at various parts of the United States since. While in Jamestown she met and married M. L. McKibbin. During the twenty-five years of their wedded life two children, Jesse and ….ara came to bless the family. The family came to Beach in 1904 and lived here until 1914 when they moved to a ranch near Intake and since that has been their home. Mrs. McKibbin leaves to mourn her loss a husband, W. L., Mrs. Roy …lstead and Mrs. Walter S. Brooks of Intake. The advance wishes to join the many friends of the family in extending their sympathy to the bereaved family. Funeral services will be held in the Congregational church in Beach on Tuesday at 2 p.m., and she will be laid to rest in the Beach cemetery. Easter Star will probably officiate at the services as Mrs. McKbbin and her two daughters belong to the Beach chapter.


August 30th, 1918

Fritze - Threse Wedding

The marriage of Miss Hattie Threse and Ed. Fritze took place in Wibaux last Tuesday, August 27. The young people are well known around Beach and vicinity, as the groom has been here for a number of years past, and the bride came here from St. Cloud, Minn., two years ago. For the past year Miss Threse lived at the Reeve ranch north of Beach. Mrs. Fritze left soon after the wedding for her home in St. Cloud to see her brother who leaves for the army soon. After her return the young couple will make their home in Beach.


September 6th, 1918

Frank Zeigweid Killed in Action

The official telegram announcing the death of Frank Zeigweid was received by Mrs. Zeigweid while at the switch board at Golva Thursday afternoon, saying that her son had been killed in action the 18th of July. Frank enlisted with the Bismarck company from Mandan last fall, and was very much interested in the war and anxious to get into action. He was young, being only 21 years old the 24th of August, and full of the ambition and energy that all of our American boys have. He came to Beach with his mother, two sisters and a small brother from Hebron, N.D. several years ago. The children attended school at this place and were well known and liked by the younger set. Two years ago the family went to Golva where Miss Emma Zeigweid has been teaching in one of the grades. Frank worked at that place for about a year. He leaves to mourn his loss a father in Canada, mother of Golva, sister Gertrude, a trained nurse in Chicago, Elmay and younger brother Eddie also of Golva. We wish to express our sympathy to the bereaved family.


September 6th, 1918

Cooper - Carpenter Nuptials

Last Tuesday, Sept. 3rd in the private parlor of the Callendar hotel Miss Martha Elizabeth Carpenter of Minneapolis and Mr. R. M. Cooper of Beach were quietly married by Rev. Thatcher. They had as witnesses, Miss Edna Sttiner (sic) and Mr. R. W. Sprague. The bride was becomingly gowned in a white Marquisette trimmed with pearls over a white crepe de chine. Mr. Cooper wore the conventional black. They stood against a back ground of ferns and flowers and were quietly married, no relatives or friends of either party being present. After the ceremony the bride donned a blue traveling suit and the happy couple autoed to Sentinel Butte, where they caught No. 2 for Dickinson. They had intended to go to Bismarck and the cities but were compelled to return to Beach on account of unlooked for business (sic). Mrs. Cooper’s home was in Minneapolis, having taught there for the past sixteen years in the primary department of the Lyndle school. She was highly respected in that place, and made warm friends who regretted having her leave them. Mr. Cooper’s original home was in New York City and when first working traveled out of that city for a number of years. For the past fifteen years he has been ranching in Wyoming, but two years ago bought out the Callender Hotel in Beach. Since that time he has resided here and made friends. The couple have made friends among the young people here already and we are sure that many social evenings will be spent there with the younger set. Beautiful gifts were received by the couple, not only in showers for the bride, but since the ceremony. We join with the many friends in wishing them joy, prosperity and long life.


September 6th, 1918

The funeral services of Mrs. W. J. McKiddin were held in the Masonic Temple last Tuesday afternoon. The services were opened by a quartet by the Mesdames Brastrup and Swan and Mrs. Conrad and Mr. Brastrup. This was followed with a prayer by Rev. Bosworth and a short sermon by him. The Mesdames Swan and Brastrup then sang a duet and the Order of the Eastern Star took charge of the service. They closed by singing “Nearer My God To Thee.”


September 6th, 1918

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Kolinsky a seven pound baby girl.


September 6th, 1918

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mann of Trotters, a boy September 4, both mother and child are doing nicely.


September 6th, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Howard are the proud parents of a pair of twins, 7 pounds each, born to them on September 3rd.


September 13th, 1918

The many friends in Beach of Miss Angelyn Waters will be pleased to learn of her wedding in Chicago to a prominent young doctor of that place.


September 13th, 1918

Mrs. Clark Reed and daughters, who have been visiting at the formers mother’s, Mrs. T. N. Kirkpatrick, south of Beach, left Monday afternoon for Seattle, Wash. where Mrs. Reed will meet him and make their home.


September 13th, 1918

Frank Kunda Killed In Runaway Accident

The death of Frank Kunda occurred Thursday, September 12, at St. Phillips, Mont. His eighteen year old son Frank had hitched a frisky team of horses to the buggy and the team became frightened and ran away from the boy, running into the father and instantly killing him. John Kunda was born and raised in Winona, Miss., and lived there until 13 years ago, when he brought his family to St. Phillips to live on a farm. He was well known in this country by the early settlers and greatly respected. He leaves to mourn his loss a wife and three sons Eddie, Harry and Joe, all of St. Phillips.


September 13th, 1918

Pioneer Resident Passed Beyond

The death of Chris Larsen occurred at St. Joseph’s hospital at Dickinson last Wednesday evening at 12:00 o’clock. Mr. Larsen had been ailing for some time past and it was decided to take him to Dickinson last week. At first it was thought he was getting better. The doctor pronounced the case peritonitis and no hopes for recovery. He was born in Norway in 1862 and grew to the age of 16 before he came to this country. He went to Winona, Minn., and worked a number of years and then went to Minneapolis, where he met and married Miss Christena Johnson. Later they moved to Lanesboro, Minn. and thirteen years ago came to Beach, where he filed on land north of town and lived for some time. He leaves to mourn his loss a wife, Christine Larsen and six children, Mrs. Walter Stecker of Westerheim, Carl Larsen of Wibaux, Harold who is in the fighting lines in France, and Hazel Lillian and Charles of Beach. The funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon from the house, and the remains will be buried in the Lutheran cemetery. The community extends sympathy to the bereaved family.


September 13th, 1918

Hershey - Wait Nuptials

The marriage of Miss Bernice Hershey of Morristown, Minn., and Mr. Wayland Wait of Westerheim N.D., was solemnized at the St. Joseph’s Catholic church at Mandan, N.D., on September 2nd, 1918. The happy couple will reside on the groom’s farm near Westerheim, on which he is building a new bungalow. They have the best wishes of the whole community who join in wishing them a long and happy life. At present Mr. and Mrs. Wait are visiting with the groom’s sister, Mrs. J. M. Stecker.


September 20th, 1918

The many friends of John Kirkpatrick were shocked as well as grieved to learn that an official telegram had been received by T. N. Kirkpatrick that John had been killed in action July 18th. John was a well known resident in the Golden Valley, his father, M. H. Kirkpatrick resides near Sentinel Butte. He leaves a father, two brothers and as sister as well as a large number of friends to mourn his untimely demise.


September 20th, 1918

Golva News -

Last Monday morning at eight o’clock, Requiem Mass was held in the Catholic Church in honor of Frank J. Zeigewied, who was killed in action July 18th.


September 20th, 1918

A baby girl was born at the home of Bert Whitker last Wednesday. Both mother and child are doing nicely.


September 20th, 1918

George Wright, who was called to Charles City, on account of the illness of his mother, returned to Beach last Friday night. His mother passed away last Monday.


September 20th, 1918

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Charles An….y of Golva, a baby girl on last Thursday. (transcriber’s note: see article from September 27th, 1918)


September 20th, 1918

Sentinel Butte Man Died Last Sunday

Henry Franzen, aged 53, died at 5 o’clock last Sunday afternoon at his home in Sentinel Butte, his demise being due to cholera morbid with edema of the lungs as a contributory cause.


September 27th, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Anthony are the proud parents of a baby girl born Tuesday.


September 27th, 1918

Golva News -

Myrtle Kirkpatrick was a Beach caller Monday, where she was having dental work done.


September 27th, 1918

Peeks Celebrate Golden Wedding

At the home of their daughter Mrs. E. E. Lloyd, an elaborate dinner was served to Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Peek and their sons and daughters, in honor of their 50th anniversary, which took place last Tuesday, Sept. 24th. Altho it was given to simply get the family together and not for gifts, the happy couple were given $60.00 in gold pieces. The Peeks have made their home in Beach at one time and made many warm friends, who heartily wish that they at least pass another twenty five years together. The guests were: - Mrs. Fred Near and children, Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Peek of Glendive, and Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Lloyd. They plan on making their home in California for the winter, and will probably leave about the fifth.


October 4th, 1918

Erick Conrad Swing Died in Service

It is with a great deal of regret that The Advance is called upon this week to chronicle the death of Erick Conrad Swing, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Erick Swing of the Carlyle district, which took place at a hospital in Chicago, Sunday, September 29, the ailment being Spanish and lung fever. Mr. Swing was born in Thassela, Sweden, and came to this country with his parents when only two years of age, residing until eight years ago at Princeton, Minn., at which time the family moved to this country and have resided here since. He was 28 years of age at time of death. He was a young man of exemplary habits and prior to the time of his entering the service was deputy sheriff of Fallon country, which position he filled with honor to himself and the satisfaction of the people whom he served. Although of foreign birth he was the first one of the young men in the Carlyle district to offer his services to his country in the hour of need and entered the naval service at Baker, Mont., over a year ago. In the final farewell with his father the latter remarked that he never expected to see him again and, to which the young man replied: “I have but one life to give, and it can be given in no better cause than the service of my country.” He was sent to the naval training station on the great lakes and recently the disease was contracted which resulted in his death and which is taking so many of our young men in the different cantonments of the United States at this time. The body was shipped to Carlyle where the funeral services were held on Friday afternoon of this week, from the U. B. church, under direction of the I.O.O.F., of which society he was a member. The deceased leaves his parents, three sisters and a host of friends to mourn his untimely death. Among the floral decorations upon the casket was a large gold star, which signified that death had come to the deceased while in the services of his country.


October 4th, 1918

Guy Bryson Killed In Lumber Mill

Word was received by Blaine Bryson of Carlyle that his brother Guy, who was employed in a lumber camp in Ashford, Wash., was killed accidentally while working in the mill. Guy was a well known resident of Golva, and his many friends join in extending their sincere sympathy to the bereaved ones.


October 4th, 1918

Terrible Accident Results in Death

The death of Ben Schylowski, 14 years of age, occurred Monday night at Dickinson, N.D. The boy had started to town with a load of grain and in some way, which is not known to anyone, was thrown out of the wagon and under the wheels. They ran over his abdomen and he lay unconscious on the road quite a while before anyone discovered him. He was brought to Beach at once, and from here they hired Mr. Greiner to take him to the Dickinson hospital. He died almost immediately upon arrival at that place. His remains were brought back to Beach Tuesday, and the funeral will be held in the Catholic church at St. Phillips at 12:00 o’clock, Thursday. Ben leaves to mourn his loss, his parents, three brothers, William and Peter at home and John in France, and two sisters, May and Mrs. John Lulahenchy, of this place. The community extends their sympathy to the bereaved family.


October 4th, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Muna Hawkaas are the proud parents of a baby girl, born September 28th.


October 4th, 1918

Born, October 1st, to Mr. and Mrs. Stewart Severson, a big baby boy. Both mother and child are doing nicely.


October 4th, 1918

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Phillip Wicka, a big baby boy, last Tuesday night.


October 4th, 1918

Mrs. T. J. (sic) Kirkpatrick of Golva, was in Beach Monday having dental work done.


October 4th, 1918

Two Children Taken By Cholera Infantum

The death of the little Harvey baby took place last Sunday afternoon at their home in Beach. The child had been sick for the past two weeks with Colera Infantum, gradually growing worse, notwithstanding that they did everything in their power to save the child. The funeral was held in the M. E. Church and the services were conducted by Rev. Thatcher at 10:00 a.m. The remains were buried in the M. E. grounds. The Allen people out of Sentinel Butte lost their baby in the same way. It too was sick for two weeks with Colera Infantum, gradually getting worse until death occurred. Rev. Thatcher held services for this child Tuesday afternoon at 2:00 p.m. and it was buried in the M. E. cemetery. The people of the community in which the families lived, extend their sympathy to them.


October 11th, 1918

Birthday Party

A party was given for little six-year-old Maynard Linger last Friday afternoon, at his home. Fourteen boy friends were asked and two or three older people, besides his teacher. The occasion, of course, was the celebration of his birthday, and the house was very artistically decorated in Halloween pumpkins, ghosts and goblins. Even the favors which were given as prizes to those who won in certain games, were Halloween designs. The children were seated at little tables in the two front rooms, and were served a real course dinner like big folks. After they were through they stood by the side of their chairs and sang songs they had learned in school. Everyone of the children had a delightful time and hope that Maynard will have a party every year with a reproduction of all the good things to eat.


October 11th, 1918

The Supreme Sacrifice Upon Country’s Altar
Four Deaths this Week Among the Soldier Boys who Entered the Service from Golden Valley County

It is seldom that a newspaper is called upon to perform the task of writing the Obituary notice of four boys in one week who have made the supreme sacrifice upon the altar of their country, yet this is the duty assigned to us this week. Words cannot convey the deep debt of gratitude the people of this community owe to the young men who have made this sacrifice, or the respect in which their memories will be held in the coming years. At each Decoration Day it will be our privilege to decorate their graves with flowers, and in the presence of the dead to reconsecrate our lives to those principles which made bloodshed and battle since our forefathers at Valley Forge waged battle against the father land. The funerals of Russell O. Hubble and John Larsen, the later of Golva, were held in Beach today, and in both cases a military burial was given. In the case of George H. Kuhn we have only the telegraph announcement of death in action, and a fitting memorial service to his memory will be held at such time as public gatherings are again permitted. In the mean time his body will rest under the sunny sun of France, perchance amid the carnage of battle in which he had played an important part in times past.

George H. Kuhn
The announcement of the death of George H. Kuhn, son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Kuhn, who live north of town, was received this week, and announced the death in action on August 21st, 1918. George Kuhn was among the first to enlist in Company M, Second North Dakota, at the time a call was made for the organization of a company at Beach last year, and at the time of death he was employed in the medical department of the government service in France. It will be remembered that Company M was transferred from the infantry to the ambulance branch of the service upon arrival at Camp Green, N.C., and it was in this service that he met his death. No particulars are given, but to have met death in action signifies that it was in his ministration to the wounded upon the field of battle amid the awful rain of shot and shell of deadly conflict that the message came. George H. Kuhn was born at Agnes, Grand Forks county, N.D., March 2nd, 1893, and was, therefore, 25 years of age at time of death. He leaves a father, mother, two sisters and one brother to mourn his loss. He came to Golden Valley county eleven hears ago with his parents, and during his parents, and during this residence here has endeared himself to his many acquaintances by those sterling qualities of manhood of which he was so abundantly possessed.

Russell O. Hubble
The death of Russell O. Hubble is particularly pathetic. He answered the call of his country just two weeks ago last Thursday, and almost immediately upon entering Camp Custer, Mich., he was stricken with the Spanish influenza, death coming to his relief at 7:15, Tuesday morning, October 8th. Russell O. Hubble is the second son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Hubble and was born in Greenwood, Wis., March 24th, 1890, which makes him 28 years of age last March. He came to North Dakota and this section of the state in 1905, and during his residence here has made for himself many warm friends. He was married January 7th, 1918, to Miss Freda Fingle, who, together with his parents, five brothers and one sister, are left to mourn his untimely death. Two of these brothers are now serving in the United States army in France. The body was returned to Beach, Friday, for burial and during the afternoon it was laid in its final resting place with military honors. To the bereaved wife and parents the sympathy of the community is extended.

John Larsen
The third death of those in the military service this week is that of John Larsen, which took place at Camp Grant, Ill., October 6th, of lobar pneumonia. This soldier is the son of Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Larsen of Golva. He was born in Jackson county, Minnesota, and came to this country four years ago, where he has won for himself a proud reputation as a young man of integrity and sobriety. Besides his parents he leaves four brothers, Christian, of Clay county, Minnesota, Rasmus, of Valley City, N.D., Lewis and Knute of this vicinity, besides his many friends, to mourn his loss. The body was returned to Beach for interment and on Friday afternoon it was conveyed to the silent city of the dead under military escort, and a short open air service conducted at the grave by Rev. Tjornhom. Relatives from Moorhead, Minn., Nebraska and other places were present. At both of these funerals the Home Guards of Beach furnished an escort of honor and at the conclusion of services at the grave fired the salute of honor of three volleys and the sounding of “taps” on the bugle. In each of these cases the young men have made the supreme sacrifice to their country’s call and while words cannot express the respect and reverence in which their memory is held by the community, yet we can see to it that the sacrifice they have made shall not have been in vain, but that “a government of the people, by the people and for the people” shall be handed down to future generations unfettered by the mailed fist of autocracy.

Joe Froeling
Word was received recently that Joe Froeling died Monday Oct. 7th at Camp Grant of influenza. Mr. Froeling left for Camp Grant the first of Sept. and word of his death was a surprise to his many friends and relatives. Previous to the time he left for camp he was manager of the Beach Co-Operative store at Golva, and before that he worked in the store at Beach for five months, so that he was well known around Beach and Golva and had many friends. They will be sorry to learn of his sudden death. He was only 26 years of age. His people live at Watkins, Minn. which was his home before coming to Beach.


October 11th, 1918

Catherine McCarthy Died Thursday

The sudden death of Miss Catherine McCarthy occurred at her home Thursday morning at 6 a.m. She had been sick for the past week with a cold, and they thought perhaps she might have Spanish influenza. A nurse was called and everything that loving kindness could do was done for her. She was born in St. Paul and lived there with her parents for a number of years, afterward moving to Belle Plane, Minn., where she finished her high school course at the age of 18 years. From there she went directly to the Valley City Normal, where she graduated with honors and came to Beach and accepted a position in the Beach school where she taught for four years. Her folks had moved out here while Catherine was at Normal. Last summer she decided upon taking a business course, and went to the Glove Business College, in St. Paul, and finished her course only a few weeks ago. Upon her return to Beach she accepted a position as stenographer for the Keohane Abstract Co., and it was while at this work that she was taken sick. She leaves to mourn her loss, a father and mother, and three brothers and two sisters. John is at Homestead and is now only recovering from the pneumonia, which proved so fatal to Catherine, and could not attend the funeral, Mary Margaret, Martin and Michael are still at home. We wish to extend our sympathy to the bereaved family in their hour of sorrow.


October 11th, 1918

Arnie Flor

The death of Arnie Flor took place in the Glendive hospital at 11:30, Wednesday evening. The cause of his death was stated in last weeks paper which was the accidental shooting of a gun in the Warner yard, the bullet of which hit him. Although Mr. Flor was section boss at Beach and made his home at this place for the past two years, with the Crossman family, he has no relatives here, they being in Norway, where he came from here. He has a cousin in Forsyth, Mont. and it was there that the body was shipped to, and buried Thursday afternoon. Mr. Flor was well like here and his many friends will feel bad over the news of his death.


October 11th, 1918

Kees Baby
The death of W. C. Kees little baby occurred at Ollie, Mont. Friday morning as a result of Spanish Influenza. Both Mr. and Mrs. Keeys (sic) were sick yesterday with the flu, and it proved too much for the baby. Mr. Kees is cashier of the bank at Ollie, and altho I could not learn just how long they have been at that place, they seemed to have made warm friends, who are helping them in their hour of sorrow. Mr. Brastrup went to Ollie Friday morning to attend to the case, and the funeral will probably be then or not later than Saturday. It is to be hoped that the parents recover from the awful plague soon. We do indeed extend our sympathy to the parents who are sick and have lost the shining light of their home.


October 11th, 1918

Card Of Thanks
We wish to thank the people who helped us during the sickness and death of our little girl. We wish especially to thank those who gave floral tributes.
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Allen and Family


October 11th, 1918

Born to Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Haigh a 8 1-2 lb. baby boy, last Monday Oct. 7th. Both mother and child are doing nicely.


October 11th, 1918

Mrs. George Irving and son Maxim …lroy left Thursday for Boston, Mass. They were called there by the sudden death of Elroy’s wife.


October 11th, 1918

Popular Couple Marry

Last Friday morning at 10 o’clock in the Catholic parsonage, Father Hoke pronounced the words that united Miss Buelah Dilley and Ernie Slocumb in the holy bonds of matrimony. Miss Saddie Slocumb, a sister of the groom, was bridesmaid, and Ronald Dilley, a brother of the bride, was best man. The bride was dressed in a silver toned suit, with gray kid shoes and hat to match. The groom wore the conventional black. Directly after the wedding the newly weds were taken to Sentinel Butte in a car by the best man and bridesmaid, where they caught No. 2 for Grand Forks, where they will visit Mr. and Mrs. Joe Dilley for a few days. On their way home they stopped off for a day and visited the Hoffmans at Mandan. Upon their arrival in Beach, Monday evening, they were taken to the Dilley home, a little way out of Beach, where an agreeable surprise awaited them in the nature of a reception gotten up by thirty-five of their immediate friends. An enjoyable evening was spent in games, dancing, etc., and immediately after the 12 o’clock. luncheon the happy couple were given some lovely silverware by the crowd, wished the best of luck and happiness during the coming years and the friends departed to their homes. The young people will be at home to friends at the Dilley home for the time being or until further arrangements can be made.


October 11th, 1918

Married at Wibaux

The wedding of Miss Helen Curl and Frank Schouboe took place a week ago last Tuesday, October 1st, at Wibaux. The knot was tied by the Methodist minister and they had as witnesses Guy Curl and his wife. Immediately after the ceremony the young people autoed to Glendive, where they will make their future home and where Mr. Schouboe is employed in a garage.


October 11th, 1918

Terrible Accident Results In Death

The death of Ben Schyloski, aged 14 years, occurred Monday night, September 30, 1918, at Dickinson, N.D. Bennie started to town with a load of grain, and the hired man and another son went to town also with a load. His father had gone in ahead with the car. In some manner Bennie fell off his load and was run over. The other team came up to him and his brother and the man tried to have him ride to town on the load of grain, but the pain was too great. There was no Samaritian near by so the two other boys placed Bennie in a straw pile about seven miles southwest of Beach and came to town for assistance and laid thereabout two hours before help came. He was conscious all the while. He lived eleven hours after the fatal accident. He was brought to Beach and from here they hired Mr. Greiner to take him to the Dickinson hospital. He died almost immediately upon arrival at that place. He remains were brought back to Beach, Tuesday, and the funeral held in the Catholic church at St. Phillips, at 12:00 o’clock Thursday. Ben leaves to mourn his loss, his parents, three brothers, Peter and John at home and William in France, and two sisters, May and Mrs. John Lukiannchuk, of this place. The community extends its sympathy to the bereaved family.


October 18th, 1918

Death of William Hoffman

The death of William Hoffman occurred at his home, five miles north of Sentinel Butte, last Sunday. He was a man ninety years of age, and alone. He had farmed that piece of land north of town for several years and had made a success of his work. Although that old he still lived alone on his place and died in that way. Friends however looked after him and his remains were buried Tuesday in the Sentinel Butte cemetery. Rev. Bosworth of the Beach Congregational church officiated but only a short service was carried out on account of the order preventing gatherings. No relatives are left so far as is known.


October 18th, 1918

Mrs. A. Juhnke left for New Ulm, Minn., Wednesday noon, called there by the death of her father.


October 18th, 1918

Born, to Mr. and Mrs. S. D. Whitmer, a baby boy, last Friday. Both mother and child are doing nicely.


October 18th, 1918

Mrs. Gretchen Skinner Dead

Word was received Sunday morning of the death of Mrs. Gretchen Skinner, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Crossman, living twelve miles south of Sentinel Butte. Mrs. Skinner died Saturday night at Campbell hospital, Norfolk, Nebraska. The remains will be brought to Beach for burial in the family plot. A son, Guy Crossman, preceded her two years ago. Besides her father, mother and husband she leaves a brother to mourn her loss.


October 25th, 1918

Greer - Ebert

The marriage of Miss Helen Greer and Mr. Lewis Ebert occurred at the Methodist parsonage Tuesday, at one o’clock, the ceremony being performed by Rev. Thatcher. The bride was dressed in a dark blue taffeta, with georgette crepe sleeves, while the groom was dressed in black. The wedding was a very quiet affair and undoubtedly will be a surprise to the majority of their friends. The couple are from Fallon, Mont., and only came to Beach for the day, returning home of No. 3 the same day. Both people are numbered among the prosperous ranchers of Montana and will continue to make their home out of Fallon on one of their ranches. The groom worked in Beach a number of years ago and it will be an agreeable surprise to his many friends here to learn of the new step he has taken in life. We wish them luck.


October 25th, 1918

The Price of Peace And World Democracy
This Section of the Country Paying Its Share, Both in Lives and Treasures

Walter and R. E. Johnson

During the past few weeks the awful cost of war and what France and England must have suffered, has been brought home to the people of this section of the country with telling force by the frequent arrivals of the remains of some young man who died in camp in the United States, or the announcement from the war department that some of the boys “over there” had been killed or wounded. A particularly sad case is the double death which has entered the home of Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Johnson of the Ollie district, and took from them their only children. Walter and R. E. Johnson had been very anxious to enter the service and at the first opportunity signed up, entraining for Camp Custer last July. They had repeatedly expressed the hope to their parents that it would be their good fortune to see service in France, and in this they were heartily supported and encouraged by the old folks, who wanted the boys to feel they had had a definite part in the establishment of a lasting peace. In seemed, however, this was not to be, for about a week ago the parents were called to Camp Custer on account of the illness of their sons with Spanish influenza. Upon arrival they found the oldest boy had passed away and the other dangerously ill. Every courtesy was extended to them while at the camp hospital and everything possible in human effort and skill was done to save the remaining life, but it proved of no avail and he died a day or two later. On the return of the parents to Beach they were accompanied by the flag draped caskets of their two sons and only children. The boys were born at Waseca, Wis., where they grew to manhood and received their education. They came west with their parents about six years ago and settled with them on a farm in North Dakota near Ollie, where they made many warm friends by their sterling qualities and upright dealings. They were 23 and 24 years of age at time of death. The funeral took place at Ollie on Wednesday afternoon, interment being made in the cemetery at that palace. May they rest in peace. The sympathy of the entire community is extended to the doubly bereaved parents.

Ira Hubble Death
Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Hubble will have ample cause to remember the German war, for today they place the remains of their second son in its final resting place in the silent city of the dead. Ira Hubble was 18 years of age last January and entered the service of the United States some time last June. He was assigned to the medical corps with a training station at Camp Ontario, New York, and was at that place at time of death, which took place during the early part of this week, from pneumonia. His body was sent to Beach under the military escort of Corporal Stewart, arriving Friday morning, and the funeral was held during the forenoon. A very impressive military funeral was accorded the deceased and Rev. Thatcher conducted a short open air service at the grave. Only about two weeks ago Mr. and Mrs. Hubble were called upon to bury their son Russell, who was also in the military service, and this second death following so soon make their bereavement especially heavy. To them is extended the sympathy of the entire community.

Everett Gilbert Death
A telegram was received Monday by Grandma Gilbert, announcing the death of her nephew, Everett Gilbert, only son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Gilbert of Sentinel Butte, which took place at the military camp at Grand Forks, of Spanish influenza, last Monday morning. Young Gilbert entered the service early in September and on entering the camp at Grand Forks was assigned as one of the instructors in the radio branch. His parents were notified of his illness and were with him at time of death. Everett had been a resident of Sentinel Butte for a number of years and had many warm personal friends among his host of acquaintances. The remains were taken to Mandan, where the funeral was held on Thursday forenoon, October 24th, with military honors, conducted by Rev. Father Clemens, pastor of the Mandan Catholic church, and remains laid at rest in the cemetery there. Those from Sentinel Butte who attended besides his parents, were his sister Pearl, and his aunt, Mrs. Albert Gilbert; also Ralph McKeown accompanied the parents from Grand Forks to Mandan.

Miss Pearl Wheeler
No greater sacrifice can be made than that she gave her life for other. This community was deeply grieved Sunday afternoon at the announcement of the death of Miss Pearl Wheeler, which took place at about 4:30 o’clock, of Spanish influenza. In the fullness of her desire to minister to the needs of her companions she availed herself of every opportunity to nurse her friends who were suffering with the “flu,” and her overtaxed condition made her a ready prey for the disease. One had only to listen to the general remarks, heard on every side, of approbation, love and esteem of Miss Wheeler, to gain a fair estimate of how much she was respected and admired in this city. He many friends here extend to the bereaved parents their heartfelt sympathy. Miss Pearl Wheeler was born in Hillsburg, Ont., Feb. 13th, 1889. In August, 1895, she moved with the family to Hawley, Minn., where she graduated from the high school. She entered the employ of the Northwestern Telephone Company at Hawley in April, 1907, and was there five years. In 1912 she moved to Detroit, Minn., and spent three years in the employ of the same company. She then came to Beach, North Dakota, and on October 15, 1915, she entered the employ of the Golden Valley Telephone Company. She was eleven years in the telephone service, working in three cities. She was a faithful employee and was loved by all in the telephone service and the local telephone service was closed from 7:15 to 8 p.m. Tuesday. She passed away at 4:50 p.m. Sunday, October 20, 1918. The father, mother, five brothers and two sisters live to mourn the loss of a daughter and sister. The pall bearers were from the local Masonic lodge and the honorary escort from the morgue to the depot were the employees of the local telephone company and near friends. The pastor of the Methodist church was at her bedside just before she passed away and she expressed her confidence in God and had no fear of death. A short service was conducted at the depot by Rev. Thatcher, assisted by Rev. Bosworth. Miss Wheeler was a girl of sterling character and we morn her loss from our midst.

Death of Mrs. French
Mrs. J. E. Herrick returned to Beach Tuesday morning, accompanied by the remains of her daughter, Mrs. Florence French. Mrs. Herrick was called to Pompey Pillar last Friday by the serious illness of her daughter, who had been taken a couple of days previously with pneumonia. She died Saturday evening at the home of her father-in-law. She was on her way back to Beach from the west and was making a few stops on her way home when she was taken suddenly ill at Pompey Pillar. In August she had been called to her sisters, Mrs. N. D. Read, on account of illness in that family and up until a week ago had been helping her sister at that place. Florence Herrick was born at Abercrombie, N.D., where she grew to womanhood and finished her education in that vicinity. Later they moved to St. Cloud and in the year of 1909 moved to a farm near Beach and since then have lived here. Mrs. French is the owner of land, having taken a half section two years ago last August. The first of last June she married S. M. French and they lived in the Trotters vicinity, where their land is located, until he was called to the colors the 22nd of July. He was sent to Camp Custer and has only recently recovered from an attack of influenza. He was notified by wire of the death of his wife and arrived on No. 1 Thursday morning. Mrs. French leaves to mourn her death, her husband, S. M. French, her parents, three sisters, Mrs. Pearl Edwards of Trotters, Mrs. N. D. Reed of Deer Lodge, Mont., and Miss Ruth Herrick of Trotters, and three brothers, Howard and Ben of Trotters, and William in active service in France. The remains were buried in the Beach cemetery Thursday morning and a short service conducted by Rev. Bosworth. The Advance extends its sympathy to the bereaved husband and relatives.

Former Beach Man Loses Child

Bert Whitaker, who lives north of Beach, and Guy Whitaker, received word Sunday of the death of their brother’s, Jesse, little girl baby at Dunn Center, N.D. They immediately took the car and autoed through and were in time to attend the funeral Monday afternoon. The child, Alice Marie, who was between the ages of one and two years, was taken ill the later part of last week with pneumonia, but the last reports received were very encouraging, until the announcement of death came. Little Alice leaves to mourn her loss, her parents, two brothers, Kenneth and Omar, and one sister, Erma. The Advance extends its sympathy to the parents.


October 25th, 1918

The baby girl which was born to Lieutenant and Mrs. Ted Hoverson last Sunday, at Valley City, died Monday. The grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Hoverson, went to Valley City, Tuesday, to attend the funeral. Mrs. Hoverson as well as her husband, is well acquainted in Beach and their many friends here will indeed be sorry to learn of the sadness which has entered their married life.


October 25th, 1918

Misses Dorothy and Frances Newell came over from Wibaux, Tuesday in order to be present at the short service which was given Miss Wheeler before her remains were taken to Ohio for burial.


October 25th, 1918

Miss June Wimer, who went home on account of the serious illness of her brother, Leon, has written intimate friends here that he died of pneumonia last Thursday, at his home in Minnesota, Minn.


October 25th, 1918

A new baby girl was born to Mrs. Russell O. Hubble, Monday afternoon. Both another and child are doing as well as could be expected.


October 25th, 1918

Born, to Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Fishback, Wednesday morning, a nine pound boy. Both mother and child are doing nicely.


November 1st, 1918

Beach Pays Heavy Toll To Spanish Influenza
Verily Death is Stalking Up and Down Seeking Whom it May Devour

The death rate in Beach this week is larger than heretofore and the majority of them have been caused by the Spanish influenza. However, Beach has been very fortunate in comparison with other towns, for the reason that stringent measures were taken here to prevent the spread of the disease in time. Doctors and everyone that can possibly be of any assistance, are doing their best to help the needs of the people. Following are the deaths:

Baby Hust and Mother
On the 23rd of October the little month old baby Hust died, north of Sentinel Butte, of pneumonia. Everything was done for the little one that could be, but the parents lived some distance north of town and it was very hard to get either a doctor or nurse. They buried the baby at the Sentinel Butte cemetery on the 25th and the next day the mother, Mrs. Carl Hust, died of the same disease and placed at rest beside her child. The only one left is the father. Both were first attacked with influenza, which developed into pneumonia.

Henry Plumley
Hernry Plumley, aged 86 years passed away at his home, eight miles south of Medora, Thursday night, having been afflicted for some time with cancer of the stomach. Deceased came here from Wisconsin about six years ago and settled on a homestead, where with his family he has made his home since that time. A wife and six children are left to mourn his demise, Earl Plumley and Mrs. J. M. Hellickson of Medora, John Plumley of Beach, Mrs. John Casey of Miles City, and two sons who reside in Wisconsin. The remains will be shipped to the old home in Wisconsin, where funeral services will be held. - Billings County Herald

Paul R. Graham
The death of Paul R. Graham, formerly of Fargo, occurred Sunday evening at Bismarck, after an illness of a week. He lived in Fargo until about three years ago, when he went to Bismarck to work in the First National Bank. Two weeks ago he left Bismarck for Beach, to assume the management of the J. R. Waters farm loan investment business, but was here only a few days when he contracted influenza. Mr. Graham was a violinist of great skill and was well known in musical circles in Bismarck and Fargo. He made his home with his mother, Mrs. Samuel Graham. The young man’s father Samuel Graham of Fargo, left Sunday for Bismarck. Paul Graham attended the Fargo high school and Fargo College, and was also a student at the Fargo conservatory of music, and during the last year of his residence there he was a teacher of the violin at the conservatory.

Peter Malliner
Peter Malliner, a young man 27 years of age, who was employed on the Fred Buck farm this fall, contracted pneumonia which caused his death on the 25th of October. He was buried the day following at the Catholic cemetery and the short service held was officiated at by Fr. Hake. The young man was born and raised in Malvin, Minn., and received his education at that place. About two years ago he offered his services to his country and served in the capacity of gunner on one of the ships used to transport U.S. troops to France, and is said to have made the first trip to England on the “Vaterland” after it was taken over by the United States and fitted for transport work. Some six months ago he received an honorable discharge from the service on account of his eyes. He worked at various things in the east and then came west and was employed at Bucks. He leaves to mourn his loss, his parents at Malvin, three sisters, Mrs. A.R. Farnum of Sentinel Butte, who attended the funeral, Mrs. Lizzie Heiger of Malvin, and Mrs. Mable Cobbler of Canada, and four brothers, Frank, Tony, Joy and Martholomew.

Mrs. Malin Stecker
The sad and sudden death of Mrs. Malin Stecker occurred at her home north of Beach, last Wednesday morning. Mrs. Stecker contracted the “flu” and pneumonia set in almost immediately, making her a quick victim to the disease. Her husband and little four-year-old son also contracted the disease, but escaped from pneumonia. The best of care was given Mrs. Stecker by kind relatives and friends, but without avail. She was born and raised in Henning, Minn., where she grew to womanhood. Henning was her home until nine years ago when she came west and married Malin Stecker. Only one child blessed this union. She was 31 years of age at time of death. The funeral services were held in the Beach cemetery Thursday morning, Rev. Thatcher officiating, and only the immediate friends and relatives were present. She leaves to mourn her loss, a husband and little son on the farm north of here, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Wait of Hemming, Minn., Mrs. Rose Wagner of Spokane, Wash., Mrs. John Rasburn, also of Spokane, Mrs. Monty Curtis, Edith Millan and Mrs. George Stecker. She had many very warm friends who will miss her presence among them.

Miss Dora Eslick
Word came to Beach, Thursday morning of the sudden death of Miss Dora Eslick, of Belfield, who is well known among the Beach people and who made many warm friends while working in the telephone office in this city. She had been under the doctor’s care for several days, but nothing seemed the trouble, simply a weak heart. She retired Wednesday night in apparently her usual health and Thursday morning when her people went to call her, found her dead in bed, having expired some time during the night, and very probably was sleeping when death overtook her. She was born and raised in Belfield, and first worked in the telephone business at that place. Later she worked in Bismarck, Dickinson and last in Beach. She was compelled to resign her position and go home last summer on account of poor health. The funeral services were held at the cemetery in Belfield, Friday morning at 12 o’clock. Rev. S. J. Swanson having charge of the services. She leaves to mourn her loss a father, James Eslick, two sisters Helda Eslick and Mrs. Ted Barrows, all of Belfield.

Rosella Trollope
The death of Mrs. Rosella Trollope, 23 years of age, occurred at her home on the farm in the Trotters vicinity, last Wednesday. She had a slight case of the “flu” and other complications which caused her death. At this writing we have been unable to learn where she was buried, but it was probably in the Trotters district, Thursday. She leaves to mourn her loss her husband, who is also very sick, and two small children, Ruth and Howard, both under five years of age.

Father Wolphers
J. J. Bartley received a telephone call from Dickinson, Thursday, saying that Father Wolphers of that place, had died early Thursday morning of influenza. Father Wolphers came to Beach in the year 1910 from Mandan, where he had previously officiated as priest of the Catholic church. He had change of the Beach church until last June, when he was called to Dickinson, Father Hake supplying the vacancy here. Father Wolphers was a native of Germany and received much of his education in that country before coming to America, but completed his education here. He was a very learned man and up to the time of his death was an ambitious student. He died at the age of 48 years. No particulars as to the arrangements for the funeral are available at time of going to press. He leaves one brother in Red Wing, Minn., to mourn his demise, besides his host of friends in Beach and vicinity.


November 1st, 1918

A message came to the parents of Harvey A. Abrams Thursday morning that he died in France of wounds received the 26th of September. Harvey was in the artillery.


November 1st, 1918

Mrs. Nick Smith received a message Tuesday evening from Omaha, Neb., announcing the death of her sister from an attack of the “flu”.


November 8th, 1918

Influenza Situation Greatly Improved
Frequency of Attack Is Less and Cases Seem to Be Less Violent

Again this week we are compelled to report a number of influenza cases, of which death has claimed its share. We can take courage, however, as the number is not so great this week, and then an old time winter has set in and that is said to be an enemy of the “flu”.

George Sperry
The death of George Sperry occurred at his home in the Trotters country, November 3rd. He was a farmer at that place, where he owned and operated a homestead. He was born in Wisconsin in 1878 and grew to manhood at that place. His schooling and associates were made there and it was his home up till a few years ago, when he came west to try and make a start in life for himself. The funeral was held at Trotters and the remains were laid at rest in that vicinity. He leaves to mourn his loss his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Sperry, a wife and several sisters and brothers.

Eddie Killian
Mrs. Edward Corn was called to Beach from Lambert, Mont., on account of the serious illness of her brother Eddie, who lives in the south country and who was a victim of the influenza. The death is doubly hard for Mrs. Corn as it was only three weeks ago that Eddie Killian went to Lambert to help his sister in her hour of sorrow, the death of her husband, at which time Eddie was perfectly well. Only a short time after his return home he was taken ill and died November 1st, and was buried in the Burkey cemetery the following day. Eddie Killian was born at White Hall, Wis., in 1888, where he lived until six years ago, when he came west to try farming. His parents and a married sister lived here and Eddie made his home with the later. He was a bright young man and would have been twenty years of age the 13th of this month. He leaves to mourn his early demise, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Killian, four sisters, Lizzie and Stella Sonsallago, Golva, Mrs. Patrinella Corn and Mrs. Frances Klimek, both of Lambert, Mont., and three brothers, Joe, Steve and George, all of Golva. The sympathy of the community is extended to the bereaved family.

Mrs. Andrew Detta
The death of Mrs. Andrew Detta occurred at their farm south of Beach, Wednesday. She had been wiling for some time past and the cause of her death was consumption. She leaves to mourn her loss, her husband and several children. We are sorry that we have been unable to obtain further information in regard to this death.

Mrs. J. W. Gowers
A wave of sadness went over our community Tuesday afternoon, when it was learned that Mrs. J. W. Gowers had passed away. Mrs. Gowers had been suffering from an attack of the influenza and seemed to be on the road to recovery until Friday last, when pneumonia developed. From that time on she grew rapidly worse, and in spite of skilled nursing and careful medical attention, the end came. Mrs. Gowers, nee Emily Johnson, was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Johnson. She came to the Golden Valley with her parents several years ago from Sioux Falls, S.D. where she spent her childhood and received her education. In 1910 she graduated from the nurse’s training school of the Hinsdale Sanitarium, Hinsdale, Ill., and since that time resided with her parents at their home west of Golva, until January last, when she was united in marriage with James W. Gowers. When the present epidemic of influenza first struck Beach, the deceased bravely offered her services as nurse, and it was in the discharge of her personal duties that she contracted the disease which cost her life. She is worthy of all praise and honor, for like our soldiers who are daily offering “the great measure of devotion,” she gave her life that others might live. Besides her husband and parents, she leaves four brothers, Will, George, Samuel and Joseph, and one sister, Evelyn, to mourn the loss of a gentle and affectionate sister, wife and daughter, and host of friends who grieve that a life so full of promise should be so brief. Short consolation services were held at the home at 10:00 o’clock Friday. The funeral services will be held Saturday at 12 o’clock at the Beach cemetery. A brother and wife will arrive from Battle Creek, Mich., to attend the last sad rites. The sympathy of the entire community goes out to the bereaved husband and relatives in this hour of sorrow and loss.

Death of Charles Weid
Charles Weid was born at Bank Lick, Kenton county, Kentucky, on July 4 , 1882, and passed away at his home in Beach, November 2, 1918, at 7 o’clock a.m., making him a little over 36 years of age at time of death. He had suffered for the past two years with diabetes, which, taken with the influenza, caused his death. Mr. Weid spent the greater part of his life in Indiana, and was for three years a member of the Indiana state militia. He was in Cuba during the Spanish-American war, was troop trumpeter of the Fifth Cavalry during the Pekin relief expedition and after that saw three years of service in the Philippine Islands. Throughout his military experience Mr. Weid served with distinction. When his country became involved in the present great conflict, Mr. Weid was again ambitious to take his place among the fighting forces, but ill health would not permit. With his family he moved to Beach in 1909 and shortly after his arrival located on a homestead near Sentinel Butte. A few years later he returned to Beach and remained here until his death. During the past four years Mr. Weid has been engaged in the railway postal service. He was married to Miss Florence Pratt of Philadelphia, February 25, 1905. To this union were born seven children, two of whom died in infancy. Beulah, Thomas, Elsie, Donald and his wife are the only near relatives to mourn his death. Funeral services were held at the Protestant cemetery November 3rd, conducted by Rev. Thatcher, pastor of the M. E. church, of which Mr. Weid for a long time had been an active member.

Mrs. James Hayes
Word was received Tuesday, November 4th, of the death of Mrs. James Hayes, a niece of Mrs. Ed Petty. She contracted the influenza and it was only a matter of a few days before she passed away. She was born at Breckenridge, Minn., September 14, 1896, and lived at that place with her parents until she had nearly grown up. In 1911 she came to Beach with her father, sister and brother, and made her home here with Mrs. Perry for four years. During this time she met Mr. Hayes and on February 4, 1917, they were married. In May of this year they went to National, Wash., and had just got settled in a nice little home when death claimed her. She was buried Wednesday at National. She leaves to mourn her loss, a father at National, a brother Frank at Crandell, S.D., and a sister, Mrs. M. J. Goodwin, of Beach, besides those near relatives who were so kind to her. Her many friends in Beach will be sorry to hear of her untimely death.

Another Golva Boy Killed in France

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Sonnek have received official notice of the death of their son, Frank, somewhere in France. Frank Sonnek was killed in action August 24th. The family have the heartfelt sympathy of the entire community.


November 8th, 1918

Word was received by Mr. and Mrs. T. N. Kirkpatrick, that their son Alfred, who is at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, is seriously ill with Spanish influenza. His many friends in Golva and vicinity hope for a speedy recovery.


November 8th, 1918

Golva Notes -

Earl Kirkpatrick, who recently enlisted in the U. S. Marine, received his call for duty last Thursday.


November 8th, 1918

Mrs. Ed Corn left Thursday for her home in Lambert, Mont. She has been in Beach on account of the illness of her brother who died of the influenza the last part of last week.


November 8th, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Kukowski are rejoicing over a baby boy, born to them Tuesday, November 5th.


November 8th, 1918

Mrs. A. Juhnke returned to Beach, Thursday from New Ulm, Minn., where she was called a couple of weeks ago on account of the serious illness of her father, who passed away at that place after her arrival.


November 15th, 1918

Death Rate Not Abated
Spanish Influenza no Respecter of Persons

Rudolph Thompson passed away Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Schulke both died the same day. George C. Abrams died at Camp Lewis.

Rudolph Benjamin Thompson
The death of Rudolph Thompson occurred at his home in Beach, Saturday afternoon. He had been sick for about three weeks, having contracted the influenza, which developed into pneumonia. It was thought at one time that the disease was conquered, and the nurse and doctor worked hard to keep the lungs clear and help him gain strength, but it was impossible to save him. Rudolph was the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. River Thompson, and was born May 31, 1888, on the old homestead near Blair, Wis., making him 30 years, 5 months and 9 days old at time of death. At the age of four years he moved with the family to Blair, where he attended the public schools, finishing the grades and three and one- half years of high school work. He completed a course at the Dixon, Illinois, business college. In the spring of 1907, together with the family, he came to Beach, and settled on a farm one mile south of town. Here he remained three years when he became a partner in the lumber business with his father and brother Albert. He was united in marriage to Miss Minniella B. Holven in May 1911, and with the exception of a few months each year in California, have made Beach their home. To this union one child was born, Earl Ralph Thompson, who is about four years of age. Besides his wife and child, he leaves to mourn his loss a father, who lives at Long Beach, Cal., and the following brothers and sisters: Charles L. of Grafton, N. D., Mrs. Thea R. Anderson, recently of Golva, Mrs. R. Thompson, of Blair, Wis., Harvey R., of Beach, Mrs. J. O. Knutson, of Blair, and Albert R., of Beach. His remains were laid at rest in the Lutheran cemetery Wednesday afternoon, the business houses of the city closing during the services as a mark of the respect and esteem in which deceased was held. Beach has indeed incurred a deep loss in the death of Mr. Thompson, and the absence in our midst of so congenial and honorable a man he proved himself to be will be long felt. The most sincere sympathy of the entire community is extended to the loved ones of the deceased.

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Schulte
The deaths of Ed Schulte and his wife took place last Wednesday evening at four o’clock. Both had contracted the flu and were very sick when pneumonia set in and both died. They were young people and had only been married since last July. The farm on which they lived was near that of their parents, and they were getting along nicely when this disease, which is so prevalent, overtook them. At the time of their illness her brother Lawrence had passed away with the flu and was buried in the Burkey cemetery in the morning and their deaths occurred in the afternoon of the same day. They were laid to rest at the same time by Father Lack in the Burkey cemetery. Besides their parents they leave a number of brothers and sisters to mourn their loss.

George C. Abrams
George C. Abrams was born August 7, 1896, at Hudson, Ill., and in 1909, in company with his parents, removed to Carlyle, Mont., where he resided until he was called to the service of his country. He left Wibaux for Camp Lewis, September 6, 1918. On September 23rd, he was stricken with paralysis and departed this life November 5th, at the age of 22 years, two months and 29 days. On July 24, 1918, he was united in marriage to Miss Olive Stark of Ollie, Mont. His wife and parents were called to Camp Lewis in the early part of his illness and his wife remained at his beside until the end came. His remains arrived at Ollie, November 10th and November 11th the funeral services for him as well as memorial services for his brother, Harry Abrams, who died in a hospital in France, September 20th, from a wound received while fighting for his country, were held, under the auspices of the Odd Fellows, of which both were members, George having joined the lodge at Ollie, December 17, 1917. Rev. Bovee spoke words of comfort and consolation and the remains were laid to rest in the Ollie cemetery. George was a genial, noble and useful young man, who numbered his friends by this acquaintances. The large concourse of sympathizing friends and the many beautiful floral offerings bespoke the high esteem in which the family is held. Besides his wife, parents, brothers, sisters and other relative, he leaves a host of friends to mourn his loss. The family have the sympathy of the whole community in their double loss.

E. R. Farnum
The death of E. R. Fanum occurred at the home of his parents, south of Beach, last Sunday evening. He contracted the influenza, pneumonia set in and he died in a short while. The remains were brought to Beach cemetery Wednesday at 2 p.m., Rev. Bosworth officiating. The young man was born in Goodhue county, Minn., on November 14, 1876, and lived there two years, when his parents brought him west to Cass county, North Dakota, to make his home. He received all his education in that county and made his home there a long time. Two years ago this fall he started farming near Golva, and had just gotten a good start when death overtook him. Ten years prior to his farming operations he made his home near Golva and worked at the machinist trade. In that way be became well acquainted with the public and made many warm friends who will mourn his loss. Besides his wife and 3 children, he leaves his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Fanum, two brothers, Howard and Dewey, all of Cass county, and four sisters, Maud and Cora of Cass county, Mrs. Ruth Monson of New Rockford, N.D., and Mrs. Richard Patterson of Lisbon, this state.

Mrs. S. Spurlin
The death of Mrs. Inez Spurlin took place at her home on the north side of town, Monday afternoon. She had been suffering with a light attack of the influenza for about a week, which with other complications caused her death. She was born in South Dakota and lived there until twelve years ago, when she came west with her parents and made her home in Wibaux. Two years ago she met and married Mr. Spurlin, and they went to Intake to make their home, coming to Beach only a few months ago. She was 22 years of age at the time of death and leaves to mourn her loss a husband and little girl, Rebecca, 17 months of age, besides her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Lewis of Wibaux, and six brothers and sisters. Her remains were buried in the Wibaux cemetery, Thursday afternoon.

Boyd Luetke
Miss Verona Luetke of Norfold, Wis., the first of the week received notice of the death of her nephew, Boyd Luetke, at her home town. The notice stated that he had died as a result of an attack of influenza, on Wednesday afternoon. Miss Luetke came to Beach last fall to teach the T. D. School and will not go back to the funeral.

Baby Hillman
Orin Hillman of the Trotters county, lost his baby girl, Ella Rose, last Monday. She was only one month and three days old. Cause of death has not been learned. She was buried in the Trotters cemetery last Wednesday. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Orin Hillman, are left to mourn.

Frank Bagger
The death of Frank Bagger, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Bagger occurred last Sunday at their home near St. Phillips. Death was caused from the flu and heart trouble. He was a young man between the ages of 24 and 26years. His remains were buried in the St. Phillips cemetery. We can this week only make an announcement of his death as we have been unable to learn any particulars.

Aloysius Wehrman

The many friends of Aloysius Wehrman were shocked as well as grieved to learn of his death, which occurred last Tuesday, the cause being a severe case of pneumonia. Aloysius, believing he had fully recovered from an attack of Spanish influenza, resumed his outside work and was immediately taken with pneumonia. His death occurred last Tuesday. The funeral was held Wednesday at Burkey and his remains interred in the Burkey cemetery. His many friends join in extending their sincere sympathy to the bereaved ones.

James Bruiski
Out at the Joe Peplinski farm south west of Beach, the death of James Bruikski occurred this morning. He had the flu which was followed by pneumonia, causing death. He had been working for the past few months at the Peplinski farm and proved himself a congenial, hard working fellow. Some time ago he enlisted and went to Fort Dodge, Ia., to train, but on account of lesion of the heart was sent home as unfit for military duty. He was only a young man 21 years of age. The remains will be buried in the Catholic cemetery at St. Phillips next Sunday, the Father at that place having charge of the services. He leaves his parents, five brothers and three sisters to mourn his loss.


November 15th, 1918

An eight pound baby boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Bast last Monday, November 11th. Mother and child are doing nicely.


November 15th, 1918

A baby girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. Will Crone, November 1st. All are doing nicely.


November 15th, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Larsen are the proud parents of a baby girl, born to them November 23rd.


November 15th, 1918

John Hanavold is the father of a baby boy, born at their home November 5th. Mother and child are doing nicely.


November 15th, 1918

Woodard - Gordon

A quiet wedding took place at the Methodist parsonage on Thursday evening of this week, which united in the holy bonds of matrimony, Miss Carrie Woodward (sic) and George Gordon, Rev. Thatcher performing the ceremony. The bride was dressed in a very pretty soft blue silk. Both of the contracting parties are very well known to the people of Beach and the surrounding community. Mr. Gordon has been a prosperous farmer in the north country and came here when the country had only a few settlers. Mrs. Gordon has lived in Beach for the past few years, built a home here and is quite well known. The Advance joins in extending congratulations to the happy couple.


November 15th, 1918

A. N. Eliason was called to Kerkhoving, Minn., Tuesday, on account of the death of his sister, Mrs. Jacobson, November 11th of the flu.


November 15th, 1918

Word came to Mrs. G. I. Elliott, Monday, of the death of her brother, Hugo Nelson, which took place Sunday, at his home in Plummer, N.D. She was also notified of the illness of her mother.


November 15th, 1918

Rich Conlin, a nephew of Mrs. J. P. Smith, died at his home in the Trotters country the fore part of this week with the flu. The remains were shipped to Chicago for burial.


November 22nd, 1918

Number of Deaths Are Decreasing
Prominent Sentinel Butte Merchant died Last week. Harry Anderson Died in France

Although the “flu” is still having a run in Beach and the surrounding vicinity, the number of deaths have abated and we are indeed glad to be able to make this report. The majority of deaths this week are among out of town people. According to reports from other towns and from the southern portion of the United States, Golden Valley is considered among the lucky counties. The deaths this week are as follows:

Harry R. W. Anderson
A telegram was received by Mrs. Gust Anderson, at the Bonnie View post office, last Saturday, stating that her second son Harry, died in France, of lobar pneumonia, October 21st. Harry was born August 21st, 1892, in Cumberland, Wis., and lived there with his parents until nineteen years of age, when they moved to Barnesville, Minn., remaining there five years and then moving west to their present address. When they arrived here they moved at once to the Hall ranch, where they lived until last fall. This summer he enlisted and went to Fargo, where he received preparatory training and was sent almost direct to Camp Mills then to Europe. His death must have been very sudden, as his parents have been receiving letters from him right along and he seemed to be in good health and splendid spirits. He was a very popular among the younger set and they will indeed be sorry to learn of his misfortune. Besides his many friends he leaves to mourn his loss, his parents and Mrs. Gust I. Anderson, five brothers, Roy, Art, Guy, Elmer and Arnold, and four sisters, Emma and Mabel at home, Mrs. G. E. Peeper of St. Paul, and Mrs. N. J. Spores of New Ausburn, Wis. The sympathy of the entire community is extended to the bereaved family.

Thomas J. Cassidy
Thomas J. Cassidy died at his home in Sentinel Butte, Friday, November 15th, at 11:30 p.m., from pneumonia, following influenza. The funeral was held Sunday from the home with services by Father Hake. He was laid to rest beside his mother in the Beach cemetery. Deceased was born in St. Paul, Minnesota, on March 5, 1886. Fourteen years ago he came to the Golden Valley with his mother and step father, T. A. Burns, and settled on a homestead eight miles southeast of Sentinel Butte, which he still owned at the time of his death. He also owned 160 acres adjoining, which was bought subsequently. In February, 1912, he opened the Gem Grocery store in Sentinel Butte and has enjoyed a steadily increasing business each year. On November 18, 1914, he was married to Car…e E. Glaum, of Detroit, Minn. He is survived by his wife and three brothers, three half brothers and his step father. His step father and half brother Frank are on the farm near Sentinel Butte, his brother James and half brother Lawrence in Washington state, his brothers Andres and George in Minneapolis, and half brother William in Sentinel Butte. All were at his bedside when he died except James and Lawrence, but the former arrived on Monday.

Jesse J. M. Castle
Jesse John Murdock Castle was born September 26, 1896, at Walnut,…… He moved with the family to …North Dakota in 1910 and came to Beach with the family in the fall of 1912. He passed away Friday night, November 15, at 11 o’clock. He is survived by his father, mother, three brothers in France, Clayton, Alonzo and Harmey, and three sisters, Mrs. ..Montgomery, of Tampic, .. and Bessie and Mildred, of this……

Iva Kelso
Iva Freer was born in 1899 and died at her home northeast of Sentinel Butte, on Monday morning, November 18th, at 9:35, from influenza. Had been sick about a week. She moved with her parents to this place about twelve years ago. In 1916 she was married to J. J. Kelso and to this union was born two children, Joseph, two years old, and a little girl whose death was premature, just a few hours before its mother. Her father and mother are both living, four sisters, Irma, Helen, Melissa. Also four brothers, Byron, George, Wilbur and Van Buren, the two youngest ones being in France.

Thomas Graven
Thomas Graven was born October 6, 1900, in Grove Spring, Missouri, and died in Sentinel Butte on November 15, 1918

. He moved to the Butte in 1910 with his parents, where he attended school until about a year ago, when he accepted a position on the section crew of the Northern Pacific, where he was still employed at-time of death, which was caused by pneumonia. He was buried November 16th, in the Sentinel Butte cemetery.

Hans Hoeck
Word was received Wednesday by Miss Anna Hoeck, of the death of her brother, Hans Hoeck, at Dell Rapids, S.D. He was taken a week ago with the flu, which developed into a fatal case of pneumonia and he passed away Tuesday evening about 10 o’clock. The remains were buried Thursday at that place. He leaves a wife and two children, the youngest only four months old, to mourn his loss, besides his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Hoeck of Beach, and three sisters, Mrs. Guy Dailey of Mandan, Anna and Hilda at home, and three brothers, Will, who lives north of Beach, and George and Theodore at home.


November 22nd, 1918

Word was received Tuesday that Hans Hoeck, a son of George Hoeck, north of Beach, was very sick with a case of influenza in a St. Paul hospital.


November 22nd, 1918

A telegram was received Saturday afternoon by Mr. and Mrs. G. F. Anderson, stating the death of their son Harry, caused by influenza. A few months ago Harry entered the army and at the time of his death was in active service in France. He was a bright, capable young man and his loss is keenly felt among his many friends. To the sorrowing family their many friends in the neighborhood express heartfelt sympathy.


November 22nd, 1918

On last Thursday occurred the marriage of Miss Carrie Woodard and Mr. George Gordon. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Thatcher at the M. E. parsonage. Both are well known in the neighborhood and to them is extended congratulations and best wishes for many happy and prosperous years.


November 22nd, 1918

A gloom was cast over the community last week by the death of Mrs. Malon Stecker, who passed away last Thursday. She leaves to mourn her loss, a husband and little son Clifford to whom their many friends wish to express the greatest sympathy.


November 29th, 1918

Three Victims of Influenza In Golden Valley County this week. The Disease has Subsided in Beach. Still prevalent In County

Mrs. J. C. Loop
The death of Mrs. J. C. Loop took place at her home south of Sentinel Butte last Sunday afternoon. She had contracted the “Flue” and death resulted almost immediately. Minie (sic) Grace Montgomery was born in Green Lake Co, Wis., December 9th, 1865, and died November 22, 1918, being fifty-three years, eleven months, and fourteen days at the time of demise. She lived in Green Lake Co. until the age of fifteen years, when she moved to Hull Sioux Co, Ia., and lived there for a short while before going to Marion Junction, where they took charge of a general Merchandise Store for an Uncle of hers, until his death. From here she returned to her parents home at Doon Lyon Co, Ia. where she taught school until she married J. C. Loop in 1892. Seven boys and three girls blessed this union, all of whom are living to mourn her loss. Daniel, Clayton, Cecil, Charles, Willard, Harvey, Edgar, Ruth and Jacob Loop. All are at home with the exception of Cecil Loop, who was serving in the service on Mare Island, Cal. The deceased was always a kind and loving mother, very industrious and a great church worker and she had many friends who will mourn her loss. (Transcriber’s Note - not all of the children are listed there is one extra boy and the article is missing two of the girls)

Mrs. Hubert Miller
Thanksgiving morning the death of Mrs. Hubert Miller of the Trotter country occurred, at the home of Mike Moran, who so kindly offered to take her in his home and care for her during her illness. While taking care of her husband who had the influenza, Mrs. Miller contracted the disease herself. There being no one at her home to help her, she started out on horse back with her six weeks old baby in her arms to procure help somewhere. This is how she met Mr. Moran, who at once recognized her condition and brot her to town to get medical aid. Wednesday afternoon they brot her husband into town, and he was at her bed side Thursday morning when she passed away. Her mother Mrs. Thompson of Quincy, Ohio was notified, and will arrive in Beach Saturday, to take charge of her little granddaughter, (whom is receiving the best of care at the Steiner home), and also to take her daughters remains to her old home in Quincy for burial. Mrs. Miller was born and raised in Quincy, Ohio, met and married Hubert Miller, of that place also. They were married Oct. 28, 1914 and at once came west to make a start for themselves in the hills of Dakota. They had been married just four years to the day, when her death occurred. The bereaved husband has the heart felt sympathy of the whole community.

Earnest Meyers
The death of Ernest Meyers occurred at his home last Friday. He was taken the week before with the flu and pneumonia developed causing his death. His remains were shipped to his old home at Norwalk, Wis., and will be buried there. Ernest Meyers was born in Norwalk, Wis., in 1874, and resided at that place until 12 years ago, when he came west and started farming. Four years ago he was married to Miss Elizabeth Ramstead. He was a very successful farmer and will be greatly missed by friends. He leaves besides his wife, his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Christ Myers, and six brothers, Ed., Chas., Frank, Jake and Oscar of Norwalk, and a brother Albert near Beach. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the community.


November 29th, 1918

Marriages
Blue - Garrish

Last Wednesday afternoon at the Congregational parsonage, Rev. Bosworth pronounced the words which made Ruth Blue and Howard Gerrish (sic) man and wife. It was a very quite wedding, no one being present outside of the relatives, besides Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Carlyle, who were the brides maid and the best man. The bride was very prettily gowned in blue taffeta, with blue velvet panels, a blue hat to match, and she carried large bouquet of American Beauties. The brides maid wore a very pretty blue crepe de chen gown. The groom and best man wore the conventional black. Immediately after the wedding a party of young people, made up of the Senior Class and their advisors (Supt. Lewis and Miss Johnson) autoed out to the brides home, and a very sumptuous wedding supper was served to all. A very enjoyable evening was spent, the young people were showered with the best of good wishes as to their future, besides the lovely presents given, and all guests were cordially invited to their own home, near Golva in the near (Transcriber’s Note: this article ended at this point)

Popular Couple Wedded

Benjamin H. Butterfield and Miss Fauney Rae Posey, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edgar A. Posey of Richey Mont. were married November 25 at Glendive, Mont. The bride is one of Dawson Counties most popular daughters. She came with her parents seven years ago from Decator, Ill. to their present home on a ranch three miles from Richey. The groom is a prosperous farmer and rancher near Richey, and is too well known for further introduction here. His genial and sunny disposition won and kept him many friends where ever he went. Mr. and Mrs. Butterfield will be at home to their friends after Jan. 1, 1919 on the grooms ranch at Richey, Mont.


November 29th, 1918

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Leo McLaughlin a big baby boy, last Wednesday evening. Both mother and child are doing nicely.


December 6th, 1918

Second Epidemic Claims Larger Death Rate
Prominent Beach Woman died Wednesday. Sentinel Butte also lost an esteemed Woman

Mrs. G. D. Lovell
A gloom was cast over the entire community Wednesday forenoon when it was learned that Mrs. Guy D. Lovell had succumbed to pneumonia, following the Spanish influenza, the struggle for life ending at about 10 o’clock. Something like a week before both Mr. and Mrs. Lovell and two children were stricken with the dread epidemic, but in the case of Mrs. Lovell was followed by pneumonia and she became a victim to the disease. Mrs. Lovell is one of the pioneers of this city and is known throughout the entire community. Prominent in church and lodge work, every ready to lend a helping hand in case of need, and her genial and loveable disposition made her friends number with her acquaintances. Her husband will mourn the loss of a faithful and accomplished wife, the children a fond and loving mother and the community one of its most estimable and popular citizens. The funeral was conducted from the residence Friday afternoon and was under the auspices of the Eastern Star, of which order she was an honored member, the local Masonic body officiating as escort. The most sincere sympathy of the community is extended to the bereaved husband and motherless children.

Ralph Kenneth Purvis
Death from the dreaded epidemic, Spanish influenza, has taken another Golden Valley county boy, also in the service. The brave young soldier, only twenty years of age, volunteered his services in behalf of his country and outraged humanity, went to Miles City for examination, but was rejected on account of not being of sufficient weight for his height, and consequently not strong enough to withstand the hardships of war. but undaunted by this the young man with the courage born of youth, went to St. Paul, where he passed a satisfactory examination October 23rd, and joined the marines to leave for training camp November 19th. On that date he was called home on account of the serious illness of his mother and contracted the disease while on the journey home, and was not feeling at all well when he returned to St. Paul, but always conscientious in regard to his duties, he was determined to go back to headquarters to report. After returning to the city his condition rapidly grew worse. His father started for St. Paul as soon as he received the telegram, but was unable to see Ralph alive, as the message was not sent in time. The mother, brother and grandfather were all sick at the time of his death and were unable to attend the funeral. Ralph Kenneth Purvis was born June 26th, 1896, at St. Cloud, Minn., and came with his parents to the Golden Valley in the spring of 1904, where he resided until called to the service. Died at St. Paul, Minn., December 1, 1918. He was educated in the rural schools and did one year of school work at the Beach High school, then deciding upon a business career he attended business college at LaCrosse, Wis. He worked for some time on The Advance and by his genial and obliging manner made many friends, as he also did in school and with whoever he became acquainted with. He leaves to mourn his loss his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Purvis, one brother, grand parents, aunt and uncle and Mr. and Mrs. Rube Clark, of Hodges, Mont., aunt and uncle Mr. and Mrs. Mason Vanderhoof, of Belle Prairie, Mont., sister-in-law, Mrs. Charles Purvis, Jr., and cousins from Belle Prairie, Mont., Mr. and Mrs. John Harpster. The remains were brought home Tuesday on No. 3, the funeral services being held Thursday at 2 p.m. Interment was made at the Beach cemetery, the ceremony at the grave concluding with military honors. The sympathy of the entire community goes out to the bereaved parents in the loss of their soldier son who had been away so short a time before being stricken with the epidemic.

Mrs. Jameson
The sad news of the death of Mrs. A. J. Jameson was given out Monday afternoon, caused by influenza, followed by double pneumonia. On Friday the family took down with the flu, including Mrs. Jameson, daughter Mrs. Mande Brewer, and little son Gerald, and they were supposed to be getting along well. But a turn came for Mrs. Jameson on Saturday night and pneumonia immediately set in. Everything in the world was done to save her life, but her constitution was too weak to stand the complications. Elizabeth Agnes Mitchell was born at Orangeville, Ontario, December 31, 1865. She lived there for a number of years when she moved to West Virginia, where she was united in marriage to Dr. A. J. Jameson. To this union one daughter was born, Mrs. Mande Brewer. From West Virginia the family moved to Wheatland, this state,. where they resided until three years ago when they moved to Sentinel Butte. Besides the family she leaves to mourn their loss, three sisters, Mrs. J. H. Nesbitt of Hunter, this state, Mrs. Robert Richardson and Mrs. George Rozell of Ontario, Canada. Mrs. Jameson was a woman of sterling character and worth, and was beloved by a host of friends who will greatly miss her. She was a good wife and kind and loving mother, which altogether, made her one of our best citizens. The sympathy of everyone goes out to Dr. Jameson at this time. At the time of going to press his daughter, Mrs. Brewer, is very ill, his wife dying and that coupled with the fact that he has been very busy day and night with flu patients for the past two months to such an extent that he was completely worn out when his family took down, but he has stood the calamity with a fortitude better than could have been expected. It has been absolutely necessary for him to neglect some of his professional calls for a few days, but no one can expect different. The funeral was held Wednesday afternoon at the cemetery, conducted by Rev. Richter, with members of the Odd Fellows lodge as pall bearers, and a number of friends gathered to listen to the last sad funeral rites. - Sentinel Butte Republican

Otto Blomstrum
Otto Blomstrom, aged 43 years, who has been ailing with influenza during the past three weeks, died Saturday morning at 3 o’clock, his death being caused by pneumonia, which followed the flu. Mr. Blomstrom was a native of Sweden and immigrate to America seventeen years ago, settling in eastern North Dakota. A year or two later he moved to the Golden Valley and has made his home on his farm southeast of Beach ever since. He was single and the only relatives hereabouts are a niece, Miss Abbie Carlson, and a nephew, Leonard Carlson. His mother is still living in the old country, and a brother John in Seattle. The funeral was held Monday at 10 o’clock a.m., and interment was made in the Beach cemetery.

Frank Lenertz
The flu is having its run in Yates the same as every other place, and this week claimed as one of its victims a young man who is undoubtedly well known in Beach and the surrounding country. Frank Lenertz contracted the disease which is so prevalent and died at the hospital in Yates, November 30th. Frank Lenertz was born in Eureka, S.D., in 1900, and lived there with his parents until seven years ago, when they moved to Yates to make their home. He attended the Wibaux schools during the school year, helping at his father’s store during the vacation periods. He leaves to mourn his death five brothers, Lewis and Vincent who enlisted in Company M. and who are now in France, John, Henry and Joseph of Yates, and two sisters, Miss Mary, who lives at home, and a married sister at Spokane, Wash., besides his parents. His remains were buried in the Wibaux cemetery, December 3rd. The sympathy of the community is extended to the family.

Clyde Woolworth
Word was received in Beach last Saturday morning of the death of one of the young men of Beach who is well known in the north country. He died on Tuesday night, November 26, of flu and complications, at Osage, Iowa. He left Beach a few weeks ago with his sister and brothers and intended to spend a little while there with his parents and relatives before answering his call to the military service. The military call was cancelled on account of the cessation of hostilities, but he received a call much greater than that and was ready for it. He was a very likeable young man. Clyde was born in Mitchell County, Ia., in 1895, and resided at that place until eight years ago, when he came to Beach with his parents and has made this his home since that time. He attended the Beach High School and is well known among the younger set. He leaves to mourn his loss his parents, two brothers and one sister.

Mrs. Ida M. McClure
Friday morning at Ollie the death of Mrs. C. A. McClure took place. She, like a great many others, was a victim of the flu after a short illness. Mrs. McClure was born in New York state in the year 1882, and arrived at her 36th birthday last June. Mr. McClure has been in this state for a number of years and for the past six years has lived in Ollie. The funeral will be held at Ollie, Saturday afternoon at 2 p.m. She leaves two children and a husband to mourn her loss.

Frank Zielinski
Frank Zielinski, the mail carrier on Route No. 1, died at the Wibaux hospital last Wednesday night, of Spanish influenza. He had been sick only a few days when death came. He was born in Winona, Minn., in 1882, grew to manhood there and married. Six children came to bless this union. Ten years ago he, with his family, moved onto a farm six miles south of Beach and have lived there since. Besides his wife he leaves Victoria, Dorothy, Frank, Lauren, Eleanore and Thomas, to mourn his loss. The remains will be buried in the St. Phillips cemetery, Saturday. The community extends sympathy to the bereaved family.


December 6th, 1918

The Senior class members and advisors reported a very enjoyable ….e at the wedding supper held at …. Blue farm home in honor of the marriage of their daughter Ruth to ….ward Garrish.


December 6th, 1918

Burkey News -

Another very attractive wedding was solemnized at the Burkey church November 28, 1918. Miss Frances Noll and Oliver White were the contractors. No more particulars are necessary as both bride and groom are sick in bed.


December 6th, 1918

Burkey News -

A very pretty wedding was solemnized at the St. Mary’s church at Burkey, Wednesday, November 27. The contractors were Gerhard Fisher and Miss Mary Lechler. The bride was dressed in a khaki suit, the groom in blue serge. They were attended by Earl Noll and Miss Clara Lechler, sister of the bride. The young couple left for different points in Minnesota on their honeymoon. The community wish them a long and prosperous life.


December 6th, 1918

Bonnie View Items -

On last Friday occurred the death of Ernest Myers, caused by pneumonia following influenza. The body was taken to Norwalk, Wis., for interment. To the Myers family is extended the greatest sympathy.


December 6th, 1918

Bonnie View Items -

Word was received last week of the death of Clyde Woolworth. Full particulars are not known but at the time of his death he was visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. B. J. Woolworth, at Mason City, Iowa. Clyde was a young man of the best character and possessed a large number of friends in this neighborhood, who wish to express sincere sympathy to the Woolworth family.


December 6th, 1918

Arvid -

Ben Herrick and Edna Harkins were united in marriage at Wibaux, Saturday, November 30. Both are well and favorably known in this vicinity, where they have many friends who unite in extending congratulations and wish them a long and happy married life.


December 13th, 1918

Harold Cook returned from Seattle, Wash., Thursday, to attend the funeral of his brother-in-law, John Carlock, of Carlyle. He expects to remain here in the future.


December 13th, 1918

Warren Kirkpatrick of Golva returned to his home Thursday from Camp Lewis, where he had been in the service for twenty months. A great many of the boys at this camp have already been mustered out.


December 13th, 1918

Death Angel Comes To Claim Many From Golden Valley Homes

The influenza epidemic seems to have held full sway over the Beach vicinity and surrounding country during the fore part of the week, but it is believed that the latter part of the week brings its good luck and that it is the beginning of the end of the third influenza wave which has gone across the country. We hope that the disease has claimed its last victim and that from now on we will have no more deaths to report.

Charles W. Purvis
We are called upon to chronicle the death, which took place during the past week, of one of this country’s most prominent citizens, Charles W. Purvis, who passed away on December 8th, 1918, at the age of 43 years and nineteen days. Mr. Purvis was born in the county of Hendrick, state of Indiana, on November 19, 1875. During the year of 1879 his parents moved to St. Cloud, Minnesota, where he grew to manhood. In 1896 he was united in marriage to Miss Effie M. Whitney, this union being blessed with two sons, Charley A. Purvis and Ralph K. Purvis. With his family he came to Golden Valley county in 1904, and has since that time made this his home. Some few days ago he was called to St. Paul by a message stating that his son, Ralph K. Purvis, who had recently enlisted in the United States army, was dangerously ill. Mr. Purvis arrived in St. Paul a few hours before the death of his son, and the belief that he contracted the Spanish influenza, which caused his death, while returning with the remains of his son, only adds to the sorrow caused by the passing of this good man. Charley Purvis was widely known throughout this territory. He established an enviable reputation of high character, was ever honorable, thoroughly upright and held in highest esteem by his every acquaintance. Always of a jovial and generous disposition, he never lacked in friendships and no friend ever found him wanting. During his life he was successful in providing a pleasant and comfortable home, not only for his immediate family, but for his aged parents, who occupied their home on the same farm. Truly this community suffers a distinct loss in the untimely death of Charley Purvis, and this paper wishes to convey the death sympathy of many friends to this sad family during this hour of grief.

Charles Cox
The unlooked for death of Charles Cox took place at his parents’ home last Tuesday at twelve, midnight. The young man had been taken ill two weeks previous to death, with the Spanish influenza, and although he had been very sick, he seemed on the way to recovery when a turn was taken for the worse. Charles was born in Bolo, Ill, in 1886, and lived at that place until he was 21 years of age, when he came west to Carlyle with his parents and where they lived for two years before moving to the farm three miles southeast of Beach. He was an active member of the Methodist church and will be greatly missed from among them. The remains will be shipped Saturday to his old home at Bolo, Ill, for burial. He leaves besides his parents, two brothers here, Dart and Guy, and two sisters, Mrs. Claude Jones of Phoenix, Arizona, and Mrs. W. M. Crossman of Bolo. The sympathy of the community is extended to the bereaved.

Mabel Abrams
The very sad death of Miss Mabel Abrams occurred at the home of her parents near Carlyle, last Tuesday morning at 8 o’clock. She had been attacked the week previous with the flu and pneumonia setting in caused her untimely death. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Abrams, and was born in Hudson, Ill., in the 1904. When they came west in 1909 and located south of Beach, Miss Mabel came with the family. Her education was practically all gotten in the west. She was an unusually bright girl and made the most of every opportunity presented to her. She had a very likeable disposition and made friends with whom ever she became acquainted. Since the loss of her two brothers, Harry, who was killed on the 23rd of July in action in France, and George, 20 years old, who died about a month ago a Camp Lewis, Washington, she has tried to do her part in filling the gap made and making the home cheerful. Besides her parents she leaves to mourn her departure, two brothers, Charles and Will, both single, and two sisters, Florence and Evelyn, all at home. The remains were buried in the Carlyle cemetery Wednesday afternoon. Deepest sympathy is extended to the parents and immediate family, who have lost three from the home circle within the past five months.

Mrs. G. D. Lovell
Last week we announced the death of Mrs. G. D. Lovell, but were unable to obtain the Obituary until this issue. Mrs. G. D. Lovell was born in Fulda, Minn., in the year 1882, where she lived until 1903, when she moved to Gilby, North Dakota. At that place she met G. D. Lovell and in 1905 they were married and lived on a farm for two years. After leaving the farm they went to Forest River, N.D., and engaged in the hardware business. They came to Beach in the spring of 1907 and established a hardware store here, in which his brother and father are now equal partners with him. Mrs. Lovell left besides her husband, four children, Gertrude, aged 13 years, Floyd, 12 years,, Florence, 10 years, and Wallace, 8 years of age, besides a sister, Mrs. J. H. Clemens, of Sherwood, a brother, B. J. Morey, of Strathmore, Cal, and a mother, Mrs. C. M. Craemer (sic), of the same place.

Hokan Wilifred Pearson
The death of Hokan Pearson of Sentinel Butte occurred last Friday, December 6th. The young man was attacked by the flu, which caused his death. He was buried the following Monday in the Sentinel Butte cemetery.

Dan Wilson
Dan Wilson succumbed to pneumonia, following an attack of influenza, at Ollie, after a few days illness. Mr. Wilson was born at Smith Lake, Minn., August 4, 1979, and departed this life December 10, 1918, at 3:30 o’clock. When he was six weeks old his parents moved to Valley City, North Dakota, where he resided until he moved to Ollie, May 24, 1916. On May 17, 1905, he was united in marriage to Miss Ada Branch. Mr. Wilson was one of the substantial business men of Ollie, being manager of the Independent elevator. He leaves his wife and son Roland to mourn his loss besides his parents, three brothers, two of whom are in the army, and six sisters. One sister, Mrs. A. H. Conradson, of Taylor, North Dakota, was with him at time of death. Mr. Wilson was in the prime of life and the whole community feels that it has lost a real friend, as Mr. Wilson was a genial kindly man who was always ready to help anyone in sorrow or need. The funeral services were conducted from the home on Thursday afternoon, by Rev. Anthony, and the remains were laid to rest in the Ollie cemetery. There were many beautiful floral offerings to express the sympathy of the Odd Fellows, of which he was a member, the Ollie Red Cross and many friends and neighbors.

Stanley Voigt
On December 5th the death of Stanley Voigt, north of Sentinel Butte, occurred. His death was the result of the flu and exposure it was necessary for him to undergo in order that he might get help for himself and friends who were ill at the same time in a little shack off by themselves in the hills. His sister, Mrs. M. V. Horning, was called from Sheridan, Wyo, and although she arrived before his death, he was in an unconscious condition and did not know her. A brother also came from Detroit, Minn., and together they took the remains to his boyhood home for interment. His parents are dead so that he leaves only two brothers and one sister.

John Carlock
Last Tuesday evening at 10 o’clock the death of John Carlock occurred at his home near Carlyle. The deceased was taken ill a week ago last Monday and pneumonia developed which caused his death. He was born in McClaim county, Ill, September 4th, 1885, and lived there until he was 21 years of age, when he moved to Carlyle with his parents, but two years later started farming on his own account. He met Miss Hazel Cook on a trip to Sheridan, Wyo., and married her on April 18, 1911. Three children came to bless this union, Richard, Dorothy and Margaret, who, with their mother, are left to mourn his loss. There is also one brother who lives in the vicinity of Carlyle. Services were held at Carlyle on Friday afternoon and his remains will be laid at rest in the cemetery at that place.

Dan Helmer
Dan Helmer, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Helmer, of Neligh Nebraska, died at Ollie, Mont., December 9th. He had been working at that place for several months past and it was there that he contracted the Spanish influenza, followed by pneumonia, which caused his death. The deceased was born at Neligh in 1888, making him 30 years of age. His remains were shipped to the old home Thursday for burial. So far as could be learned he had no relatives in this part of the country, having drifted here himself in search of some place in which to establish a home. His sterling qualities and happy disposition won for him many close friends in Ollie, who will mourn his early death.

Ray Offley
Again we are called upon to write up another death in the Golva vicinity, that of Ray Offley, aged 25 years, who lived in the Golva country for some time and who passed away December 7th. His death was caused by pneumonia. Ray Offley was born October 4, 1893, in Sweden and came to American some years later with his parents. Having grown to manhood and desiring to make a start for himself he located near Golva and took up farming as his occupation. He was very successful, not only in a business way, but made many warm friends in that vicinity. He was a single man but providing a home of his aged mother, whose declining years he was endeavoring to make comfortable. She and a brother, also near Golva, are the only relative we have been able to learn about. It is thought his remains will be shipped east for burial, but this cannot be decided until it is ascertained how his brother, who is now sick, is progressing. The sympathy of Beach and Golva communities is extended to the bereaved relatives.

Theodore Wise
A young man 28 years of age, who lived in the Burkey vicinity, died Thursday morning of pneumonia, which followed an attack of the flu. He was a prosperous farmer and was well known in that vicinity, having lived there for a number of years. His remains were buried in the Burkey cemetery Friday morning. He leaves to mourn his loss a sister Clara, and a brother Henry, both at home, and three married sisters at Sentinel Butte, whose names we have been unable to learn. Sincere sympathy is extended to the bereaved.


December 13th, 1918

Mrs. V. Horning of Sheridan, Wy., stopped at the Cook home for a day on her way home from Sentinel Butte, where she had been called by the death of her brother. She accompanied the remains to Detroit, Minn., for interment.


December 13th, 1918

Golva News Notes -

Miss Florence Kirkpatrick is now operator in the Golva telephone office. Miss Florence Kirkpatrick was out to her uncle’s, Tom Kirkpatrick’s Sunday afternoon.


December 20th, 1918

Death Rate Less Four Are Stricken

Mrs. Margaret Mabel Wilson
Mrs. Margaret Mabel Wilson, nee Scheid, was born at Easton, Minnesota, March 30, 1896, and died December 15, 1918 at the age of 22 years, 8 months and 15 days. At 12 years of age her parents moved to Bowman, North Dakota, where on September 12, 1914, she was married to David F. Wilson. Two children were born to them, Louise Ollie, January 16, 1916, and Earl Wesley, May 31, 1917. She leaves to mourn her early demise, besides her husband and children, her father and mother, three sisters and two brothers, residing in Minneapolis, Minn. Her mother and sister were in attendance at the funeral services held in Ollie on Tuesday afternoon. The father of Mr. Wilson and a brother, of Bowman, North Dakota were also present, besides quite a number of Ollie citizens, who held Mrs. Wilson in high esteem for her modest and kindly disposition and her untiring devotion to loved ones. Mr. Wilson has been in the hardware business in Ollie for a few years past, enjoying the confidence of the people. He has the warmest sympathy of his fellow citizens in his sad bereavement.

Eva Paxton
The death of Miss Eva Paxton of Sentinel Butte occurred last Monday evening, at the home of her parents. The young lady had the Spanish influenza which developed into pneumonia, and death came quickly. The particulars of Miss Paxton’s life are not known other than this: that her accomplishments and disposition were such that, while only sixteen years of age, she had made many warm friends in her home vicinity. Her remains were buried in the Sentinel Butte cemetery, Wednesday afternoon. Her parents, Judge Paxton and wife, and one sister are left to mourn her loss.

Benjamin R. Bohn
Benjamin R. Bohn, age 24 years, 10 months and 1 day, died at his home two miles east of Sentinel Butte, Tuesday, December 17th. Cause of death was tumor of the brain. His parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Bohn, will ship his remains to Montana for interment.

Smith S. Wright
We are called upon to chronicle the death of another of the citizens of Sentinel Butte this week. Smith S. Wright died at home of his brother December 14th, of Spanish influenza after a very short illness. He was a young man 26 years of age and was a prosperous farmer of the Sentinel Butte vicinity. Interment was made in the cemetery at that place Tuesday. Other than his brother we were unable to learn whether or not he had any relatives in this vicinity or not.


December 20th, 1918

Dunlap - Treiber

Miss Minnie Dunlap and Calvin P. Treiber were united in marriage at Tacoma, Wash., December 7th. Although the news is late in reaching Beach, the many friends of the popular young bride here will be glad to wish her the best of good luck in her wedded life. At present the young couple are at Tacoma, owning to the fact that Mr. Treiber is in the service at Camp Lewis and has not yet been released. They hope however, to be at home to their many friends in the near future on the groom’s big ranch out of Billings, Mont.


December 20th, 1918

Golva News -

The Kirkpatrick brothers of Sentinel Butte, visited their sister, Miss Florence Kirkpatrick, at Golva, Sunday.


December 20th, 1918

Warren Kirkpatrick, who was stationed at Camp Lewis, Wash., was mustered out of the army December 9th and returned to his home December 12th.


December 20th, 1918

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wassman, December 12th, a baby boy.


December 20th, 1918

Rev. Father Hierhmeier, former pastor of the Burkey church before Father Lack, passed away at a hospital in Rochester, Minn. His death was due to an operation.


December 20th, 1918

Mrs. George Wassman passed away at her home near the river. No further particulars have been obtained at his writing.


December 20th, 1918

Russell Kirkpatrick of Sentinel Butte, returned to his home from Carleton College, Northfield, Minn., December 13th. He is a brother of Miss Florence Kirkpatrick, operator at the Golva exchange.


December 27th, 1918

Died

J. E. Hills
December 19th, at Sentinel Butte, occurred the death of M. E. Hills. We have been unable to learn the particulars other than he was a young man employed in the coal mine at the Butte when he became ill and died. He was alone, as we understand it, and his remains will be buried by friends in the Sentinel Butte cemetery.

George John Schuhrke
Last Saturday, December 21st, occurred the death of John Schuhrke, at Sentinel Butte. The young man, born to Mr. and Mrs. George Schuhrke in the city of Chicago, in 1885. After having grown to manhood at that place he came west and was employed at Sentinel Butte at the time of death. He contracted the influenza, which was followed by pneumonia. His remains will be shipped to the old home in Chicago and will be accompanied by his brother.

Baby Slocomb
Wednesday morning, December 25th, the sad death of the little six months old baby of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Slocomb, occurred at its parents’ home, twelve miles northeast of Beach. The little tot had been ill only two days, and its death was indeed a shock to its parents. The remains will be buried in the Beach cemetery Saturday afternoon, at 1 o’clock, Rev. Thatcher conducting the service. The sympathy of the community is extended to the sorrowing parents who have lost their only child.


December 27th, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Sorenson are the proud parents of a big baby boy, born to them December 21st.


December 27th, 1918

Mr. and Mrs. Christian Larsen, who live eight miles south of town, are rejoicing over the little daughter born to them December 19th.


December 27th, 1918

Mrs. H. L. Rice received word that a baby girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. O. V. Layman, December 11th, at Portland, Oregon.


December 27th, 1918

A baby girl was born to Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Lindsey, December 24th. This came pretty near being a real Christmas present. Mother and child are doing nicely.


December 27th, 1918

Golva News Notes (Too late for last week) -

The many friends of Mrs. Martin Hess were shocked and grieved to learn of her death, which occurred at the Golva hospital, Wednesday morning. Mrs. Hess had influenza with complications and pneumonia. Margaret Pick was born in St. Cloud, Minn., in 1884. Her mother and two sister still reside there, and her brother, Martin Pick, resides east of town. Her father died at St. Cloud about three months ago. She leaves to mourn her departure four children, two boys and two girls, besides her husband, a mother, two sisters and a brother. Mrs. Hess was a member of St. Mary’s church of Burkey and also an active member of the Altar society. Many friends will mourn her demise.


December 27th, 1918

Charlie Kirkpatrick, brother of W. Kirkpatrick, has returned to his home from Camp Raymond, Wash.



Copyright 2006 Larry Fitzgerald